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AcroChik
7th Dec 2006, 17:35
Withheld because of the sensitivity of the information and wartime censorship, articles written for the NY Times about the salvage of the US Pacific fleet at Pearl Harbor after the famous attack have finally been published.

Also included is an audio slide show, the reporter's original telegrams to the Times, the obituary for the reporter, Robert Trumbull ~ who reported on many of the 20th century's larger events ~ and other interesting stuff.

You can see it here:

http://www.nytimes.com/opinion/opinionspecial/index.html

The NY Times sometimes requires readers to register, but the viewing is free and the Times never sends junk mail or sells its users list.

Um... lifting...
7th Dec 2006, 21:46
AC-
Thanks for that post.
Spent a bit of time reading all these bits at the link. Fascinating. Prior to the flying thing went to Navy Diving & Salvage School, and we learned a bit about these operations, which remain the biggest of their kind in history. I fired off the link to a few friends I went through the school with as I think they'll appreciate it. Haven't yet finished all the opinion comments (there seem to be hundreds).
Should you ever get to Hawai'i, I recommend the Pearl Harbor tour. If you know any serving military members there, encourage them to go in uniform (and take you along). There is a VIP tour that cruises the harbor in a motor launch in addition to the stop at the Arizona Memorial and visitor's center. I don't remember the scheduling, but it's easy enough to find out.
If you're really industrious and know anyone stationed at Pearl, you might get a climb up into the conference room atop the retired and converted free ascent tower at the submarine base (photo in attached link). From there you have a good view of most of the harbor. We had a luncheon up there with the Chief Historian from the Park Service at Pearl as the guest speaker... absolutely fascinating as we'd move en masse from window to window as he told us what happened... where... and when.

http://musingsofanoldman.********.com/2006/04/escape-tower-training.html

AcroChik
7th Dec 2006, 23:05
Thanks for the great idea about the tour, UL :ok: We're about to head out to the Pacific, staying with a family friend who's an AF Bird on our way back to the mainland. I've already sent him an email asking if he can arrange this :)

We're also divers, by the way. Water's cold and viz is poor here, so it's all drysuits and wreck penetrations (German u-boats!). Looking forward to some tropical colors and warmth.

Civis
7th Dec 2006, 23:36
Thanks for posting this AC, very poignant. One of our staff did a presentation for WW II aviators yesterday and said she wished I had been there to hear some of their stories. Apparently a WASP who purportedly had done 62 consecutive spins in my first love ~ the J-3 ~ anyone add something to this claim?

AcroChik
8th Dec 2006, 00:08
About spins...

The late and very very great aerobatic artist, Ian Groom, held the record for consecutive spins: 57 ~ in under 30 seconds. I believe this record still stands. I saw him do 37 in his gorgeous zero-deck-clearance sequence a bunch of times.

Sadly, Ian died on April 30, 2004 ~ his 58th birthday ~ practicing for the McDonald's Air & Sea Show at Fort Lauderdale. He went into the water doing flat spins. Fortunately, his wife, Mimi, and son, Brian, weren't there to see it.

Um... lifting...
8th Dec 2006, 06:08
Thanks for the great idea about the tour, UL :ok: We're about to head out to the Pacific, staying with a family friend who's an AF Bird on our way back to the mainland. I've already sent him an email asking if he can arrange this :)

We're also divers, by the way. Water's cold and viz is poor here, so it's all drysuits and wreck penetrations (German u-boats!). Looking forward to some tropical colors and warmth.

I should imagine the good colonel, your AF friend, will be able to hook you up, the whole military community is pretty tight knit out there, and a couple phone calls on his part should be able to set that stuff up.

Water's cold in Hawai'i too (because it's deep)! Off Hawai'i Kai, there's a WWII Corsair sitting upright on the bottom (at least I seem to remember it's a Corsair) and you can lower yourself into the cockpit for photo ops... just watch out for the morays!) Now, if you get out to Chuuk (Truk), or Pohnpei, or WAAAAY out West like that... that's pretty warm... and that's some diving.

Another Hawai'ian secret (though not anymore). If you meet any Coasties, offer to buy them lunch on a weekend and have them sign out the lighthouse keys from the Command Master Chief.

B... b... but... I don't know any Coasties, you say.:sad: Well, everyone's life falls short in some way. Solution to everything. Take a run out to the Coast Guard Air Station at Barbers Point and pull into the Hideaway Club where you can troll for Coasties using beer... it's rather an aviation beach bar, an excuse in itself... be sure to check out the DJ booth... which is the front end of an HH-52A helicopter, suspended above the floor... there's a story behind it, which like every good tale will no doubt vary depending upon who you ask. The bar manager is usually someone (pilot or crew) assigned to the Air Station and the bartenders are usually pretty savvy (or used to be, anyway). The natives are normally fairly friendly, though you'll probably have to make the first move, a lot of people just come in to look around. You & the new Mr. AC puh-leeze don't go out in matching aloha-wear... that's the kiss of death. You can hike up to (and into) Makapu'u light or visit the lighthouse at Diamond Head (though you probably shouldn't go bang on the Admiral's front door for a coffee... he lives there, $10 million dollar views). These things put you a leg up on the average malihini haole wahine... make you more of a kama'aina! I lived out there for 5 years, so if you need any ideas to include breakfast spots or hikes or whatever, feel free to PM.