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View Full Version : Protecting our Freedoms, Australian style


Shitsu_Tonka
29th Nov 2006, 09:07
Eleven people were arrested at the recent G20 protests in Melbourne -- one of them by mistake. His name is Drasko Boljevic.

Victorian Chief Police Commissioner Christine Nixon confirmed the mistake in The Age at the time: "We have taken individuals into custody today and in one case the person was released because he wasn't the person we thought he was."

Boljevic reported the matter to Victoria Police, which is now investigating the conduct of the officers who arrested him. Last week, Crikey called the police media unit who told us it was "inappropriate to comment" due to "ongoing investigations" and indicated there could be reasons to question Boljevic's version of events. We have now learned that these reasons were unrelated to the arrest.

So what happened to Drasko Boljevic? This is the account of his arrest by his partner, Eleonor Palacio:
In between 12 midday and 12.15pm, Sunday 19 November 2006, Drasko Boljevic, my partner, was paying for a drink at Foodworks minimart, 408 Swanston Street, in front of RMIT, while his friend Oakies was inside the store.

Drasko was abducted by three bouncer-looking men dressed in casual clothes and violently taken into an unidentifiable white van, where another five of them helped holding Drasko down and handcuffed him with special plastic cuffs. Oakies heard some screams and went outside to see Drasko’s feet being carried into the unidentifiable van. He asked the abductors if they were policemen and they reply "get the f-ck out of here, get the f-ck out of this city".

The men did not identify themselves or inform Drasko why he was being abducted. He was told to "shut the f-ck up" and that he was a "f-cking bastard" and they would "bash [him] up and smash [his] face", while violently holding his legs crossed at his back and pushing his head against the floor of the van and sitting on it. They drove around the city for about ten minutes continuously terrorising him with this type of comments and physical force. They pulled his pants down, searched him and cut his backpack off his back. "I thought I was going to die, I could hardly breathe and I didn’t know who these people were", Drasko said later.

They stopped at an alleyway behind Flinders Street Station and made him lie on the floor, with his pants still down, and look down, still shouting at him to "shut the f-ck up".

Some police detectives in casual clothes arrived and identified themselves. It was not until then, about 25 minutes after his abduction, that he was informed he was arrested, no reasons for the arrest were given. They took some photos of his face, front and profile with a mobile. Then, they took him into an unidentified car and he was taken to the 412 St Kilda Road Police Station.

He started being interrogated and for the first time since the abduction he was told he was arrested for assaulting a policewoman at the G20 protest on Saturday.

Drasko was not in Melbourne on Saturday, he was on his way to Malmsbury, one hour away from Melbourne, were he played the part of an "Emu" in a cabaret show at the Town Hall. Police said later that he was arrested "on the basis of his physical similarity with a suspect".

At this point, about 2.00 pm it was apparent that they got the wrong person, and the Constable interrogating him told him he was about to be released, and that "if this was Croatia [he] wouldn’t be so lucky". He was finally released at 2.35pm.

After getting home in a state of shock and fear, Drasko realised he had a bruising in the right eyebrow (which is likely to become a black eye) and discomfort of the neck as immediate physical consequences of the violent way he was dealt with in the van.

Drasko contacted the Ethical Performance and Standards Office, under the supervision of Senior Constable Neil Curtis (who dealt with the case in the last instance) to inform of his physical state. They told him that "[he] should understand that in these circumstances they [the abductors] can’t take any risks" and that "they need to apply considerable force when dealing with violent suspects".

Buster Hyman
29th Nov 2006, 10:14
...and of course, when urine is thrown at you, barriers are thrown at you, you are spat on and abused for being easily identifiable as a Police officer, you of course would be a perfect Gentleman?

Out of curiosity, would you mask your face as well?:rolleyes:

Miraz
29th Nov 2006, 10:27
It is probably a good thing that those officers only work in Melbourne....http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/woman-in-indecent-act-with-horse-say-police/2006/11/29/1164777647904.html

419
29th Nov 2006, 10:30
and of course, when urine is thrown at you, barriers are thrown at you, you are spat on and abused for being easily identifiable as a Police officer, you of course would be a perfect Gentleman

So that makes it okay for the police to act like criminals does it?.

One of the Victoria police force "core values"
Victoria Police seeks to actively promote and maintain harmonious relationships with Victoria's diverse community. Those relationships are based on mutual respect, tolerance and trust.

Somehow, I think that on this occasion, they failed to maintain "harmonious relationships"

tony draper
29th Nov 2006, 10:35
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf."
Occasionaly the rough men get it wrong,so what.
:rolleyes:

M.Mouse
29th Nov 2006, 10:41
Getting it wrong and acting unnecessarily as bullying thugs are two entirely different things.

maxter
29th Nov 2006, 11:20
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf."
Occasionaly the rough men get it wrong,so what.
:rolleyes:

So What. I am sure you would feel that way if it was you.:yuk: That is a disgraceful way for police to behave, if it is true and that is yet to be proved, and in my opinion anyone condoning such behaviour is a disgrace as well.
The thugs and terrorists win if we are going to start behaving like them. This type of behaviour by a small minority of law enforcement people, military personel (abu graib) and 'Nazi' security screeners to name a few that just have to push things to the edge, is encouraged by the histeria generated by our politicions for their own political gain, in MY opinion.

I believe the old saying of 'what you sow, so shall ye reap' is very relevant today.

tony draper
29th Nov 2006, 11:24
Yer I mean our streets are so peacefull and law abiding these days we could have salvation army lassies and social workers parolling them and save money.
:rolleyes:
What the hell am I talking about, thats exactly what we have turned our policemen into in the UK, uniformed bloody social worker.
What we badly need on our streets are big nasy policeman with degrees in placing a large boot up scumbag arses rather than degrees in sociology.

wondering
29th Nov 2006, 11:32
Reminds me of the movie 'A Few Good Men' when Jack Nicholson explains in court how he protects our freedom. Yeah right: 'You canīt handle the truth'

tony draper
29th Nov 2006, 11:37
Well thats part of the problem,a lot of people think the world is like Hollywood,all we have to do is have a big fluffy group hug and she be right mate.

eal401
29th Nov 2006, 11:46
...and of course, when urine is thrown at you, barriers are thrown at you, you are spat on and abused for being easily identifiable as a Police officer, you of course would be a perfect Gentleman?

So that makes the scenario described in the original post acceptable then?

Just a simple yes or no will do. (Though the answer will reflect what sort of a "human" you really are.)

Grainger
29th Nov 2006, 12:40
...and of course, when urine is thrown at you, barriers are thrown at you, you are spat on and abused for being easily identifiable as a Police officer, you of course would be a perfect Gentleman?Well, I'm sure having urine thrown on you and being spat on isn't very nice, but . . . how on earth does abusing and beating up someone who had nothing to do with it help ?

Wiley
29th Nov 2006, 14:03
who had nothing to do with itUmmm, I think it would be pretty safe to say they didn't think this was the case, 'Grainger', or why would they be arresting the bloke in the first place?

Terrible experience for the mistakenly identified man, and my sympathies go out to him. However, imagine if the plainclothesmen had gone in all touchy feelie and gentle and the correct bloke being arrested (and maybe a half a dozen of his mates nearly) behaved the way he and his mates had at the G20 demonstration?

As has been said above, this is yet another example of Jack Nicholson's marine colonel and his speech to Tom Cruise and the court in 'A Few Good Men'.

I once heard it said that the law is a bit like sausage - both are best not seen being made.

Buster Hyman
29th Nov 2006, 21:27
I'll get back to you on that eal...have yet to get an answer myself.:hmm:

As you, and others, have assumed that I am fully condoning the police action by my post (taken the long bow I see), then can I assume that you are fully condoning the masked violence as it unfolded? The Police should treat the purpetrators with the utmost respect & should honour them as Political freedom fighters? A simple yes or no will do.

Perhaps we've made it too easy for people that hide behind masks & do violence "in the name of free speech"? There were plenty of people there who enjoyed their right to protest peacefully. VICPOL had gone to great lengths to reduce any tensions prior to this event. They advertised their intentions, where barriers would be, what steps were being taken and, most importantly, they insisted that the officers would not be wearing any riot gear in an attempt to defuse any violence. But of course, being in the UK, you'd have first hand knowledge of what happened in MEL right?:rolleyes:

BlooMoo
29th Nov 2006, 21:38
After getting home in a state of shock and fear, Drasko realised he had a bruising in the right eyebrow (which is likely to become a black eye) and discomfort of the neck

That's how children come back from Nursery. What exactly is the issue here?

BM:confused:

Capt. Queeg
29th Nov 2006, 21:43
Those mexicans have a long history of shooting first and asking questions later. That's why the pigs down there all pay such high union dues, it covers the retainer for all those lawyers.

Eel you may want to ponder that while you're casting aspersions on "what sort of human" being each of us is.

Now if the filth in NSW had shown a similar enthusiasm when the lebs were turning Cronulla upside down and declaring their hatred of all things Australian (apart from their dole payments) then life would be oh so sweet.....

Have to agree with Drapes' voice of reason, when I were a lad we had respect for the pigs because they'd soon bash us if we'd stepped out of line. And I turned out all right...:8

Grainger
29th Nov 2006, 21:50
Have any of you guys actually read the story ?The Police should treat the purpetrators with the utmost respect & should honour them as Political freedom fighters?This isn't about how the Police should or shouldn't treat "perpetrators". It's about how they treated someone who WASN'T EVEN THERE !!!
. . . condoning the masked violence as it unfolded? . . . Perhaps we've made it too easy for people that hide behind masks & do violence "in the name of free speech"? What the hell has this got to do with the story ? The only mask that Drasko Boljevic wore was an EMU one in a children's show in another town !

Bloo Moo - if you don't think there's an issue, how would you like to be abducted in the back of a van, beaten and abused for something you hadn't done ? Thought not.

Buster Hyman
29th Nov 2006, 22:31
Yeah, I read it.

He was treated like that, I assume, because they thought he WAS there! For all intents & purposes, much penned up frustration was taken out on this guy but, it was the wrong guy. The OPI will follow this one up & I can assure you, the OPI are hated more by the average Police officer in Victoria than as many piss throwing student arm biters as you could throw at them!

What the hell has this got to do with the story
Everything. Because they were masked, the Police had no clear ID. The mistake was easily made, especially when time was against their arrest. (One genuine article had tickets out of the country on the Wednesday after the event!) Or, are you assuming that they grabbed him randomly to make the books look good?

Don't forget, this doesn't get brushed under the carpet. As I mentioned, the OPI is more like the Gestapo than VICPOL & their sole intention is to weed out bad cops. Meanwhile, whilst the Police are answering these questions....:rolleyes:

BlooMoo
29th Nov 2006, 22:43
Grainger, I get the impression that you actually believe every word and nuance of the 'witness' statemants 'reported' actually represent the truth.

Have you ever actually been on the rough (or for that matter smooth) end of policing? Enforcement of any kind which requires physical intervention? If so you'll realize that ther are two sides to such an 'issue' and overreaction is not necessarily the exclusive sin of 'the law'.

From what I see a potentially 'big deal' was dealt with quickly. Downside is that someone who turns out probably wasn't involved ended up with a bruise.

As I said, my kids come back from school with a bruise, what's the issue? Hang on, he was supposedly traumitised with 'shock and fear'. Yeah right.

Abducted? Beaten? - I'd expect a bit more than a bruise to my right eyebrow (I'm trying not to laugh as I type this) - oh hang on it may become a black eye!!!

Come on eh? If that was a wind up you got me, hl&s.

BM:)

Al Fakhem
30th Nov 2006, 02:21
Looks like they had the girlie cops at the wrong end of town on that day....

http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,21985,20798653-25717,00.html

Richo77
30th Nov 2006, 02:31
Given that the Victoria Police have in the past been known to have a
"BANG!! Stop! or ill shoot" (also known as "i fired a warning shot, it hit you") attitude, i think i know which way id prefer to be treated! :p

Buster Hyman
30th Nov 2006, 04:38
Indeed they did Richo. My cousin was caught in one of those very incidents some years back. The intensity of the investigation almost made him quit the force. He was exonerated, but is possibly a little bit jaded by the whole experience. He moved away from the high profile roles & is now just a country cop.

It's a thankless job.

ORAC
30th Nov 2006, 07:27
BBC: Detainees 'shouted and sworn at' (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/london/6157625.stm). Gosh, imagine. Shouting at them and disrespecting them.

No wonder they rioted and wrecked the place. The horror, a British Guantanamo...... :ooh:

Capt.Grumpy
30th Nov 2006, 08:17
Al Fakhem,
That particular story was written by Andrew Bolt. If you take much creedence with what he writes, well..........what can I say :rolleyes: . A typical Rupert Murdoch product is our Andy. I always thought I was a bit right wing until I started to read Bolt and the other Murdoch "soldier poet" Piers (The Penguin) Akerman. Compared to this dynamic duo I feel like a bloody communist :mad: