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BombayDuck
19th Nov 2006, 07:11
According to today's Times of India (can't find the story online) this guy (http://news.webindia123.com/news/Articles/India/20060424/315241.html) has begged the Mumbai High Court to punish him for all his crimes as per the law, and waive the trial process so that he gets what he deserves.

And no, he's not suing the police!

Al Fakhem
19th Nov 2006, 10:40
There is no "Mumbai High Court" - it is still called "Bombay High Court". It's official web site is at http://hcbom.mah.nic.in

Loose rivets
19th Nov 2006, 11:51
Now why would anyone know that:confused:

tony draper
19th Nov 2006, 12:01
Because its the first item on a google search of Bombay Mumbai.:E
One is more puzzled by why they changed a perfect good name like Bombay.
:confused:

Al Fakhem
19th Nov 2006, 12:12
One knows that because one was in charge of Indian operations for a MNC and we were going nuts over the constant changing of city names for no apparent reason other than local politics. Cost us a sh!teload of money to change all the letterheads etc.

In the case of Bombay, the High Court refused to change its name, and we are still waiting for Bollywood to change to Mulliwood :ugh:

El Grifo
19th Nov 2006, 12:52
Still cannot get round to asking for a chennai curry :ouch:

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!
19th Nov 2006, 13:31
An aviation related story :=

BombayDuck
19th Nov 2006, 13:43
FSL Draper, Mumbai was a perfectly good name before it was changed to Bombay (Bom Bahai = Good Harbour) by them Portuguese! We just returned it back.

Not that I find it easy to call it Mumbai, 'Bombay' still comes first to my mind. In this case the article in the paper referred to it as the Mumbai High Court so I must've copied it off there...

Aaa...aargh: One begs your pardon, and shall attempt to ensure it doesn't happen.... too often. :oh:

CUNIM
19th Nov 2006, 15:21
Bangalore has been changed to a name that eludes me for the moment. The cost of name changing can be prohibitive, is it worth the trouble? I suppose that we could go back to original names in the UK. Anyone know where Corstopitum is? Now Corbridge I believe. Anyway it is nice to see a real interest in the names of the places prior to the arrival of uninvited guests.

G-CPTN
19th Nov 2006, 15:35
Even Newcastle-upon-Tyne wasn't that before they built the Castle (not the current one, but a wooden one built in 1080), but Pons Aelius.
"Wee are yee callin' a Pons?"


In between times it was known as Monkchester, but 'Newcastle' envelopes several suburbs which were earlier towns in their own right, though still remain as identifiable regions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Newcastle_upon_Tyne

Robert Curthose, son of William the Conqueror, erected a wooden castle there in 1080 and the town was henceforth known as Novum Castellum or Newcastle.

Loose rivets
19th Nov 2006, 16:23
Anyone from Bangalore now? I just wondered if my wife's house was still standing. We do know that next door was turned into an office building but we don't know the fate of her abode.

Mind you, I'm not sure that she would remember the address. I'll ask on her next call.

Aviation connection? Her dad worked for the Hindustani Aircraft company.:E

G-CPTN
19th Nov 2006, 16:37
How do regions such as India ADDRESS their properties?
I believe that certain areas of Australia require the registration of a post-box for the receipt of mail, but if you wanted to VISIT (for example, the house of someone in deepest urban India - merely chosen as an example, the situation must also exist in Africa and Asia) HOW would you give directions to a taxi?

(Am I being naive and displaying ignorance and prejudice? If so, I apologise unconditionally.)

tony draper
19th Nov 2006, 17:05
Indeed the natives of Newcastle are still known as Novocastrians,whereas we folks across the river are Gatesiders,them feckers down the road have alus been called Makums though.
:rolleyes:

BombayDuck
20th Nov 2006, 06:01
How do regions such as India ADDRESS their properties?
I believe that certain areas of Australia require the registration of a post-box for the receipt of mail, but if you wanted to VISIT (for example, the house of someone in deepest urban India - merely chosen as an example, the situation must also exist in Africa and Asia) HOW would you give directions to a taxi?
(Am I being naive and displaying ignorance and prejudice? If so, I apologise unconditionally.)

I'm not sure I understand you - on envelopes it is always House-Street-Area-City/Town/Village-ZIP Code. ZIP Code is 6 digits, first three for city/town, last three for resolution. All places in Bombay are 400xxx.

eg

10, XYZ House (or building)
LT Road
Colaba
Mumbai 400 001

So you'd tell a cab driver "Colaba" - unless you were nearby where the road name should be enough.

However this renaming thing can hurt - most people still retain the old names of areas while telling other people, even though the official names are something else....

Marine Drive = Netaji Subhashchandra Bose Road
Opera House Junction = Pdt. Paluskar Chowk (Chowk = Square)
Regal Cinema Junction = Dr. Shyamprasad Mukherji Chowk

etc.

So you'd rather tell the taxi driver Marine Drive / Opera House / Regal.... very few would know where Pandita Ahilyabai Holkar Chowk is! We call it Churchgate Railway Station :)

Al Fakhem
20th Nov 2006, 06:50
[quote=G-CPTN;2974866]How do regions such as India ADDRESS their properties?
I believe that certain areas of Australia require the registration of a post-box for the receipt of mail, but if you wanted to VISIT (for example, the house of someone in deepest urban India - merely chosen as an example, the situation must also exist in Africa and Asia) HOW would you give directions to a taxi?
[quote]

Well, most places do have street/lane addresses, but often the system used to number buildings defies logic (i.e. the numbers are not is sequence). When we lived in India, we used to give people the grid reference on the city street map (as one would do), but it turned out nobody used maps or even knew they existed. I had a driver who - instead of planning a trip using a map - simply drove around and kept asking for directions every 5 minutes. He lasted one week and I started to drive myself - much quicker.

When using a taxi, you usually have to have a nearby landmark in mind (hotel, hospital, station) - the taxi drivers also do not know street names.

In more advanced cities, such as Hong Kong or Bangkok, you can talk to the dispatcher if there are any difficulties in finding a place.

ORAC
20th Nov 2006, 07:32
This changing names thing is stupid, I think the īmericans started it. New Amsterdam had to become New York or some such....

Donīt mind what people call places in their own language Mr Duck, but it is beyond me why they insist, and we agree, to change it in English as well. Us Europeans seem to manage well enough with London/Londres, Rome/Roma, Cologne/Koln etc.

Itīs even worse with airports, now you have to know the biography of every two-bit politician for the last 50 years to work out what country an airport is in, let alone which city.... :suspect:

Foss
20th Nov 2006, 11:12
Directions I've heard given to taxi drivers here include,
Sure it's up the road there by the stone house. Number of stone houses, millions.
If you head to the farm, the one with the cows. Farms, thousands.
Aye, take us to the house with the lights on. Houses with lights on, a lot.
Fos

Polikarpov
20th Nov 2006, 11:45
Even Newcastle-upon-Tyne wasn't that before they built the Castle

Hasn't Newcastle-upon-Tyne now morphed into NewcastleGateshead (http://www.visitnewcastlegateshead.com/)? :uhoh:


Welcome to NewcastleGateshead

Located in North East England, Newcastle (on the north bank of the River Tyne) and Gateshead (on the south bank) have been transformed into a single visitor destination called NewcastleGateshead.

NewcastleGateshead is a mix of the modern and historic, renowned for its excellent shopping and amazing nightlife. But NewcastleGateshead has much more to offer - explore the beautiful architecture including the ancient city walls and castle; enjoy the stunning quayside with its waterfront bars and galleries; and don’t miss the fantastic public art such as the Angel of the North.

tony draper
20th Nov 2006, 12:00
No they are still separate entities,historically Newcastle has tried to take over Gateshead a few times but they was told to **** off,that add was obviously written by some simpering huggy fluff lefty who thinks if we all just have a big group hug the worlds problems will dissapear, Gateshead folks in a rare example of cooperation with those North of the Border actually helped them Jockistanies by offering to carry gunpowder and cannon balls and offered gave em boxes of matches ect when the Jocks shelled Newcastle from the Gateshead side of the river
:rolleyes:

Anyway name changes can often solve problems,

"What shall we do Minister? Windscale is spewing radiation over those Cumbrians"
"Let me think,hmmm,aha! got it,change its name to Sellafield,problem solved"
"Yes Minister"
:rolleyes:

XXTSGR
20th Nov 2006, 14:02
Not quite, Herr Draper!

First we got:-

"What shall we do Minister? Calder Hall is spewing radiation over those Cumbrians"
"Let me think,hmmm,aha! got it,change its name to Windscale, problem solved"
"Yes Minister"

and THEN:-
"What shall we do Minister? Windscale is spewing radiation over those Cumbrians"
"Let me think,hmmm,aha! got it,change its name to Sellafield,problem solved"
"Yes Minister"One can see it now...

"Errr, minister? What would you like to change the name to this time?"

G-CPTN
20th Nov 2006, 14:07
Could always try Seascale.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seascale