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Re-entry
30th Sep 2006, 16:11
Inuit or Eskimo or Indian?

Some revisionist librarians have decided that all natives of siberia/ alaska/canada/greenland are inuits. Nonsense. Garbage.
The inuit are one of the small canadian eskimo communities. They are probably the last eskimos to come into contact with white man. (Circa 1960) There are no inuits in alaska. Alaska has eskimos and indians.Eskimos include Aleuts, Yupiks, Chupiks, Inupiaks, Kodiaks and more. The indians are the Athabascans (central territory) and tlingits (mainly southeast AK). And if you called any of them 'inuit' , you'd get a confused look back.
The eskimo languages are self-related.
The indian languages are self-related.
eskimo/indian languages are non-related.

evansb
30th Sep 2006, 16:57
Actually sounds like a step BACK in terms of political correctness, where society has morphed to acknowledge every nuance of one's origin.

Surprising as it may be to many Europeans and Australians, many government agencies in North America refer to the descendants of the original inhabitants as "aboriginal". Many "native" North Americans are now referring to themselves and their tribes as "first nations", of which there are several dozen scattered over the continent. There exists an organization in northern Canada called "COPE", which stands for "Committee for the Original Peoples Entitlement"

Not half as funny as "Afro-American" and "Hispanic". A man's grandfather is born in Detroit, and his great-grandfather is born in Jamaica, and he is still referred to as "Afro-American".? "Hispanic"? Don't get me started...

High_lander
30th Sep 2006, 17:11
Not half as funny as "Afro-American" and "Hispanic". A man's grandfather is born in Detroit, and his great-grandfather is born in Jamaica, and he is still referred to as "Afro-American".? "Hispanic"? Don't get me started...

I thought that "Hispanics" included Mexico, Peurto Rico and Cuba. And those who of Spanish origin lived in California before after it was bought by the USA.

G-CPTN
30th Sep 2006, 17:27
A few years ago, it became politically incorrect to refer to the inhabitants of Greenland as 'Eskimos'. (I don't know whether this corresponded to, and was only relevant to my time spent living in Denmark). They were 'Inuits' just a 'Native Americans' could no longer be addressed as 'Indians' and Indigenous Australians as Aborigines.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inuit
Many Inuit consider the word Eskimo offensive,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inuit_Circumpolar_Conference
All of these peoples are sometimes collectively referred to by the exonym Eskimo, the use of which is frowned upon by many of the Inuit peoples,
ICC uses the term Inuit to refer to them all, which has its own problems. One of those problems is administrative. Is an Inuit in the United States considered "Native American," or "Alaskan Native?" Or, are they to be considered "Aboriginal American," "Other," or simply not considered at all? The Yupik of both Alaska and Russia generally dislike being called Inuit, which is not a word in the Yupik language nor a word which they use to describe themselves, and prefer Yupik but will tolerate Eskimo.
So what's going on? AFAIK 'coloured' people are now 'black' (a term that was a no-no 50 years ago), and will we see those descended from Nigerian stock become referred-to as N*****s? Oh! - and can we call people from China 'Chinamen'?
I'm not seeking to be controvertial (or offend ANYBODY), - I'm just confused.
Is there an International Committee that decides these things?

And I'm not even GOING into 'Muslims'. We had enough trouble with 'Pakistanis' as a generic-term for those from the Indian sub-continent!

What defines an Arab? Is that term now to be split down (as is 'Russian')? :ugh:

Are there any WASPs left?
What is it to be Irish? Now that Eire no longer exists (so I'm told). I'm still coming to terms with the loss of Persia and Ceylon . . .

MyData
30th Sep 2006, 18:48
A friend works for a huge global company which is based out of the US.

He was 'targeted' by an internal e-mail campaign, probably based on the colour of his skin, to celebrate diversity and join up with his local (i.e. UK based) 'African-American' community in the workforce.

His reposte was that he wasn't African, he wasn't American, he was from Huddersfield. And he heard nothing more on the subject.

Good for him.

AcroChik
30th Sep 2006, 19:50
One hears this question incessantly here in the States, "What nationality are you?" My uniform reply is, American, and it always causes a bit of annoyance in the recipient who was hoping to hear some hyphonated nomenclature with which to further divide the populace.

Oh, I long for a bit less diversity and a little more unity!

G-CPTN
30th Sep 2006, 19:57
What we need is a great big melting-pot . . .
big enough to take the world and all it's got and keep it stirring for a hundred years or more and turn out coffee coloured people by the score

Dorfer
30th Sep 2006, 21:02
I myself am an Appalachian-American. Here abouts we speek red-neckese.

ShyTorque
30th Sep 2006, 21:23
Round our way the locals are called "innits"

Innit?

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!
30th Sep 2006, 21:39
One hears this question incessantly here in the States, "What nationality are you?" My uniform reply is, American, and it always causes a bit of annoyance in the recipient who was hoping to hear some hyphonated nomenclature with which to further divide the populace. I tell them my race is "English".

storl tern
1st Oct 2006, 03:47
Surprising as it may be to many Europeans and Australians, many government agencies in North America refer to the descendants of the original inhabitants as "aboriginal".

"ABORIGINAL" - a compound of two words; "abor" from the latin 'arbor = trees' and "original" from the latin 'originalis = existing from the beginning'
therefore aboriginal = just out of the trees :eek:

Blacksheep
1st Oct 2006, 04:09
On those landing cards, they ask some strange questions, so I give strange answers. My race is Tenkay and my religion Squirmish. No-one's ever asked me about it so far.

If I was an Inuit, I might be upset if anyone thought I was an Esquimo, but who are all these 'Indians' living in America? Just because Columbus couldn't speak Hindi doesn't mean they can't be Americans, but I do wonder what the inhabitants called the place before some Spanish speaking Italian stumbled up the beach, enquiring about the location of the pepper market.

Loose rivets
1st Oct 2006, 07:41
When I first got an American driver's licence, one of the little boxes asked, ‘Race?'. I protested to the lady in charge, saying that in my country it would be illegal to ask me that. She said, ‘Oh, just leave it.'

When I wanted a green card, I had to be categorized. I now know that I'm a ‘White, non-Hispanic.' It's good to know what you are... a bit like finding your real parent.

tony draper
1st Oct 2006, 09:09
Same here, the media refer to all folks from the top right hand side of England as Geordies,of course this is not so,to be a true Geordie one has to be able to throw a lump of coal from the roof of the outside toilet into the River Tyne.
:rolleyes:

G-CPTN
1st Oct 2006, 09:29
to be a true Geordie one has to be able to throw a lump of coal from the roof of the outside toilet into the River Tyne.
:rolleyes:
:D

When I say 'Tyne Valley' folks say "Geordie?"
"Not quite." I say. "Mackem then?" :ugh:

I'm actually a NORTHUMBRIAN (and I started a Northumbrian Society at Uni). We have as much close affinity for the region as do Geordies (and would support them if required to do so). We're 'cousins' I suppose.

Solid Rust Twotter
1st Oct 2006, 09:40
I'm sixth generation African. It irritates me when people, my government included, refer to me as European.

It appears I'm too African to live in Europe and too European to live back home....:* :rolleyes: :hmm:

tony draper
1st Oct 2006, 09:42
The Northumbrian accent is almost unique,does one speak with the Northumbrian Burr Mr G-C?,one's grandad on one's mothers side did,he was a Munro born in Jockistan but his parents managed to escape across the border when he was a sprog and fetched up in Berwick.
:cool:

allan907
1st Oct 2006, 09:52
Doesn't the Northumbrian accent have something in common with Spanish?

I think that the rolled Northumbrian "r" had something to do with copying one your local lordships in feudal times so as not to offend him by making his speech impediment obvious by being the only one. Same as in Spain who, to this day cannot pronounce certain sounds (try jerez - hair eth) 'cos they all copied the King of the day who was afflicted with a lispth:}

tony draper
1st Oct 2006, 10:30
More likely derived from the Scandyhooligan lingo, twer they that held sway in the north,don't think we ever had a dago king,although one thinks we did have one for about six days that the historians don't like talking about, come to think again, it may have been a French King,which explains the tight lips of the historians.
:rolleyes:

G-CPTN
1st Oct 2006, 10:42
'Tis true about the Percy inablity to roll his arrs.
There have been many stories associated with the Northumbrian Burr and its origin, the most famous being the association with the ruling family of the Percys and that of their most famous son, Harry Hotspur, who allegedly had a speech impediment, which was copied out of respect and fear of insult by all those in his surrounding lands. Shakespeare includes this as the reason, in the second part of Henry IV:

He was indeed the glass
wherein the noble youth did dress themselves,
He had no legs that practised not his gait;
And speaking thick, which nature made his blemish,
Became the accents of the valiant;
For those that could speak low; and tardily
Would turn their own perfection to abuse
To seem like him: So that in speech, in gait,
In diet, in affections of delight,
In Military rules, humours of blood,

He was the mark and glass; copy and book that fashioned others.

tony draper
1st Oct 2006, 11:34
Harry Hotspur was a unlucky buggah, the wise old crone who lived in a cave told him he would die in Whickham, so when he was fighting down south the thought he was quite safe because he was a long way from the village of Whickham on Tyneside, but alas villages called Whickham thick on the ground then,silly buggah.

"you there churl! what call ye this village"
"Why Sir tiz called Whickham yer honourship"
"Oh **** this for a game of soldiers !!I'm off"
:ooh:

Blacksheep
2nd Oct 2006, 05:05
Speaking of true 'Geordies' being able to hoy a lump of coal into the Tyne from the back yard roof, while browsing the quayside market in Newcastle upon Tyne we came across one brown faced chap decrying his wares in broad Geordie. No doubt he was an accomplished hoyer of coal.

At the other end of the country, 'Cockneys' are defined as those born within sound of the bells of Bow. The modern cockney is now of a much less pale complexion than the chirpy cock sparrers that braved the Blitz.

Then there's my youngest daughter's boyfriend, who hails from Selkirk and speaks with a broad scottish accent. He's Chinese, or at least his parents were when they arrived in 1959. Perhaps its time to change our perceptions?

tony draper
2nd Oct 2006, 09:05
Port Said Bumboat men were famed for their ability to speak in any Northern English accent,Scouse Manc, Geordie,depending upon where the ships crew hailed from.

"Wey hinny div ya wanna buy a brass Nefertit ashtry,just dug from a toom oot in yon desat yisterday"?
:rolleyes:

Hirsutesme
2nd Oct 2006, 14:24
I've been singing folk songs for many years, including some that my mother knew (she was a Wallsend lass) One I know well, I've never felt able to sing, as I dont know what some of it means! (And neither did Mum)
I'm referring to Rap er te bank, which is a mining song. It is the title itself I'm not sure of the meaning of. I've always assumed it was about winding the cage up to the pithead, but would love to have that confirmed, or, be put right.

Smiliesam
2nd Oct 2006, 14:36
[quote=Hirsutesme;2884243I'm referring to Rap er te bank, which is a mining song. It is the title itself I'm not sure of the meaning of.

Hey! I remember that! Came just before 'Keep ya feet still Geordie hinny' and after Alex whatsisname did 'The Bells' on his squeeze box!

I loved going to folk clubs; songs of death, incest, rape, transfiguration. Just rebought all the Pentangle digital enhancements as well....
:hmm:
H.

Hirsutesme
2nd Oct 2006, 14:47
The political incorrectness of folk is part of what I love about it," Sally on the quay" is another geordie song whuich is a great example. It is about a man's love for a prostitute, the chorus is
"Ah but never mind, the lass is kind
Wor lass is good hearted
Got a cast in eye, makes her look shy,
I wish we never had parted
Shes got a hump, and walks with a stick,
but she's always good to me
I'm fond of the lass that men cant pass
the lass down on the Quay"

I love watching social workers wince as I sing it.

And of course the real history in folk songs that often differs markedly from the official version is endlessly fascinating.
And no I dont morris dance but I have been known to play the accordion!

tony draper
2nd Oct 2006, 15:02
I recal one of my teacher a certain Mr Masterman,a Cumbrian by birth who was a folk song fanatic and had all us lads singing them with great gusto,all the old Geordie and Yorkshire folk songs and some colonial ones.
Re political correctness, wonder what a modern day School Inspector would make of a classfull of lads singing,
"Neber seen the like since I been born as a big buck n*gger wi the sea boots on"
at the top of their voices.
:rolleyes:

Gouabafla
2nd Oct 2006, 15:04
Rap 'er te bank was one of my dad's favourite songs and still reminds me of him. Especially, as the character in the song, he died at a comparitively young age. I can probably provide a translation into English if you want it. The important thing to know, is that 'bank' is the surface/pit-head. Working 'at bank' was working on the surface, as opposed to the coal face.

By the way, even though the Geordies (theiving bunch that they are) would like to claim the song, it's origins are on the County Durham coal field - and distances of fifteen miles are important when NE regional prejudices are being called into question).

Hirsutesme
2nd Oct 2006, 15:10
A translation would be most welcome.

Blacksheep
2nd Oct 2006, 15:34
it's origins are on the County Durham coal field - and distances of fifteen miles are important when NE regional prejudices are being called into questionAye, yer'd be on soggy ground calling anyone from South Durham "Geordie." We'll all close ranks when dealing with southerners, mind. I gave a room half full of Yorkshiremen a hard time last month in one of my "Father of the Bride" speeches...

Whey, they shouldna carled me "Geordie", shudther? ;)

Gouabafla
2nd Oct 2006, 16:38
For some reason my wife gets most upset when I call her a southerner. Can't imagine why, she comes from Yorkshire after all.

Hirsuteme - check your pms marra!

tony draper
2nd Oct 2006, 17:12
Indeed, they speak a strange language called Pitmatic,linguists have traced its origins and mooted the possibility that the South Durham natives are decendants of the lost Tribe of Israel.
"Whey aye marra already"
:rolleyes:

G-CPTN
2nd Oct 2006, 17:55
"Neber seen the like since I been born as a big buck n*gger wi the sea boots on"
at the top of their voices.
:rolleyes:
Been there and DONE that many, many times, Drapes. :ok:

Don't they do it nowadays? :confused: :{

G-CPTN
2nd Oct 2006, 17:58
Pitmatic is, indeed, a fascinating language, as is Ashington 'English'.
baff weekend - then fortnightly pays were the custom, the baff week was when there was no pay.
bait - a packed meal.
baitpoke - a bag to carry the meal in.
bait time - a stop for a meal.
bank - the surface.
barney's bull - anything broken beyond repair was said to be like barney's bull b------d.
bat - to strike a blow with the fi3t or a hammer.
blogged up - a pipe stopped up with dirt.
bonny gan on - serious trouble.
bord - a working place in the pit.
brat - a black inferior sort of coal.
bray - to beat or punish. "you cannot bray him back with a mell" (large hammer) described a pushing inquisitive person.
bump the set - anyone taking unnecessary risks was described as "he'll bump the set some of these times". a set is a number of tubs or trucks pulled along by a rope from a fixed engine.

canch - the stone below the thill or floor of a narrow coal seam that has to be removed as coal-getting proceeds.
cankery water - impure, poisonous water, red in colour.
cant - anything leaning over is said to be "on the cant".
carvinarce - a smooth backed fossil easily dislodged.
catheid - a nodule of iron ore found in coal seams.
cavil - a working place in the mine selected by a draw.
cavilling-day - the day the draw takes place.
chinglees - pieces of coal the size of a marble.
clacks - pump valves.
clag - to stick.
clarts - mud.
cogley - unsteady.
coin - to turn from the straight.
corve - a wicker basket used in coal mines prior to the tub era.
cow - a device attached to the back of a set of tubs to prevent them running back if the rope breaks. crab - a winch used in sinking operations.

dab-hand - a capable or efficient worker.
dad - to hit as, "i'll dad the lug".
daddin - to beat the dirt out of pit clothes.
deputy - an underground official.
deputy's-end - the easy or lightest part of the work.
deputy's kist - the box in which he keeps his tools.
devil - a device for detatching the rope from a set of tubs whilst in motion.
dogs - nails for fastening down tram rails.
dollyshutting - blasting down coal without undercutting.
dreg - a wood or iron stave put between the spokes of a tub wheel to prevent it from turning thereby retarding its progress.
duds - clothes.
dunched - to run into with force as "tubs dunching".

ettle - to arrange beforehand. nb#

fairly - steady.
fash - trouble.
fast jenkin : a bordway driven in the middle of a pillar.
femmer - weak or delicate.
fernenst - opposite to.
fettle - to repair or mend.
fizzle - a faint crackling noise caused by gas escaping from the strata.
fizzled out - the end.
flacker - to flinch or turn back.
flackered - finished, unable to do any more.
flayed - frightened.
flusher - a squip that fails to do its work.
forbye - besides.
for-fairs - no trickery or underhand work.
fullick - a blow with great force.
fullen - full tub.

gar - to make or force anyone to do something.
get-thi-blaw - to rest, to regain the breath.
gis-a-low - give me a light.
glinters - curved sails to guide a rope on to a sheeve.
graithe - to make ready or repair.
grove - a space in a seam from which coal has been taken.

hacky - dirty or filthy.
hedgehog - if a strand of a wire rope works loose and gets fast, it coils in a mass of wire on the rope. this is a hedgehog on the rope.
hinny - a term of endearment.
hitch - a fault in the strata.
hoggers - shorts miners wear in the pit.
howk - to dig or scoup out, or punish.
hoy - to throw.
hunkers - the buttocks. a favourite posture of pitmen is sitting on their hunkers.

inbye - to go from the shaft bottom into the workings
insence - to make someone understand - "insence it into him".

jealoused - anticipated, something would happen.
joley - shakey, unsteady.
jowl - to test the roof in a coal seam by tapping it with the end of a stick, also a threat as "al jowl tha".

keeker : surface foreman who deals with the coal.
kenner - the end of the shift.
kep - to catch.
kep-clack - the foot valve in a pump suction pipe.
keps - props on which the cage rests at bank while the tubs are being changed.
ket - filth or rubbish.
kibble - a large iron bucket used in sinking operations, also a small low tub with open end.
kink - a twist in a coil of rope that would damage it if pulled tight.
kip - the highest point on the rollyway where the tubs are detatched.

laid outs - if a tub of coal contains more than a certain amount of stone it is confiscated, the stones and the hewer's token numbers are laid out for inspection.
limmers - wood shafts with an iron bow and a catdh to clip on to a coal tub carried on the harness of a pit pony.

marra - when two men work together each calls the other his marra, meaning equal.
mell - a large wood or iron hammer.
met - a measurement marked on a stick.
midgey - open fronted naked flame lantern.
mizzled-off - gone away.

nigh-hand-gannen - a shorter way.

onsetter - the man in charge of the cage at the shaft bottom.
outbye - travelling from the face to the shaft.

plote - pluck or bring down.
plunger - the piston in the water end of a pump.
powder-reek - smoke caused by firing a short in the pit.
progley - prickly.

rammel - stone that gets mixed with the coal in the pit.
rid - to clear out or tidy up a place.
rising main - the pump delivery pipes in a shaft.
rive - to tear.
rolleyway - engine plane.
roven - torn.

scapipen - getting coal without blasting.
scrush - crush.
scumfish - to suffocate.
shine a low - shine a light.
skeets - guides for the cages in a pit shaft.
slush hewer - a hard working coal hewer.
smart-money - compensation.
snore holes - holes in the strainer that make a snoring noise when the sump is drained.
spangued out - a prop forced out by pressure.
spelk : a splinter of wood that has stuck into the skin, also a small person.
spigot and faucet - a type of pipe joint.
spiting - storing up loose stone after a place has closed to make a way through.
sprag - a wood or iron stave put between the spokes of a pit tub wheel to retard its progress.
stowbord - an old working place into which refuse is put.
strum - the strainer on the end of a pump suction pipe.
stub and feathers - the stub is a wedge driven in between two tapered wedges in a bore hole to break down stone.
stythe - bad air.
sump - at the bottom of the shaft, a standage for water.
swapes - tub rails bent to go round a turn.
swalley - a dip or hollow on a roadway.

tageing - a hard fatiguing time or job.
tarry towt - a tarry rope.
tewed - fatigued as "it's been a tewing job".
tokens : pitmen's tallies.
tommy hack - a combined hammer and chisel ended pick used by rolleywaymen.
tuemmen : empty tub. usually pronounced chummum.

varney - very near.
viewer - obsolete term for an underground official.

wedger : anything large or outsize.
weeken - lamp wick.
whimsey - a turntable from which a rope is uncoiled.

yard-wand - deputy' s stick measuring one yard.
yebbel - able.

tony draper
2nd Oct 2006, 18:14
Many of those words were still in common usage when I was a sprog Mr G-C,among me Uncles Grandad ect, although none of them were pitmen.
I recal being on holiday on the Durham coast near Blackhall,and the pitmen still used the rather bibical thoo and thou,meaning you .
I recal one asking me dad, "Watt pit be thoo's frame"
:uhoh:
Even accents are becoming more homogenious now,30 years ago just a few miles separation and there was a distinct variation in accent,I recall listening to the hoax ripper tape for the first time,every body on Tyneside said thats a Sunderland accent, not geordie,but a chap I worked with who hailed from the town went even further and isolated the accent to one particular area of Sunderland.
:cool:

Gouabafla
2nd Oct 2006, 18:35
This is as fine an example of thread drift as you could come across.

My dad's generation still used 'thees' and 'thoos', but that form never made it down to my generation sadly.

I'm not too sure about some of the entries in yon dictionary, GC. A couple look very strange to me:

tuemmen : empty tub. usually pronounced chummum
- The definition is fine as it stands, but it should mention that it is derived from 'teum/tyum' meaning 'empty'. A tub is an underground railway waggon (often pushed/pulled by human labour or pit ponies) for transporting coal.

hunkers - the buttocks. a favourite posture of pitmen is sitting on their hunkers
- Sitting on your hunkers is to squat sitting back on your heels. I've never heard 'hunkers' be used to refer to the buttocks though it could have happened up in Ashington.

yebbel - able
- that's just standard English with North Eastern vowels and palatalisation of the initial syllable (sticking a 'y' sound in). Palatalisation is one of the features of North Eastern English which can clearly be seen to come from Scandiwegian (hyem for home being one of the better examples).

Smiliesam
2nd Oct 2006, 18:49
Pitmatic is, indeed, a fascinating language, as is Ashington 'English'.
.............................
You missed out my favorite, but although I am a Leeds lass and grandad worked at Blackall Colliery and I had uncles in Ashington, I am not sure where it originated.
'Netty'

Regards
Hazel

G-CPTN
2nd Oct 2006, 18:54
I recall listening to the hoax ripper tape for the first time,every body on Tyneside said thats a Sunderland accent, not geordie,but a chap I worked with who hailed from the town went even further and isolated the accent to one particular area of Sunderland.
:cool:
Had EXACTLY the same experience, Tony.
It seemed SO obvious that they should've done a door-to-door . . .

G-CPTN
2nd Oct 2006, 18:57
http://www.indigogroup.co.uk/durhamdialect/frame.html

Gouabafla
2nd Oct 2006, 19:00
'Netty'

I remember being very surprised, when I moved south, that people didn't know what a netty was. I thought it was perfectly standard English. (Oh, btw, it means 'bog').

G-CPTN
2nd Oct 2006, 19:04
And I couldn't believe that 'ploat' wasn't a part of the (Queen's) English Language. I SEARCHED through dictionary after dictionary in utter disbelief. I refered to it (at a Fenland University) when it began to snow with large, fluffy flakes and I observed "Mother Christmas is ploating the turkey". :{

Ploat
to pluck the feathers from a bird, but also used in slang to describe a similar action unconnected to birds or feathers
English, esp. Geordie slang

(Hope this won't get me banned again . . . )

tony draper
2nd Oct 2006, 19:49
Ah yes one remembers that one,
"Ploat" to punch bash thump or otherwise do bodily harm to
"Buggah off ya pillock or I'll ploat yer lug" = "Begone you oaf or one shall punch you in the ear"
:rolleyes:

G-CPTN
2nd Oct 2006, 20:49
In the upper reaches of the Tyne Valley we used 'dad'.
I shall dad yer lugs.

daedalus
2nd Oct 2006, 21:42
Just what the hell is a "caucasian" anyway. I am white, or rather pinkish and in the sun, reddish, and I have never been anywhere near Georgia, Abkhazia, Dagestan, Chechnya or Ingushetia. Nor, by the way, would i wish to.
:\

allan907
3rd Oct 2006, 02:29
As Cap'ns list shows - just scratch the surface a little and you'll find the language of the Vikings lurking just underneath.

In south Yorkshire we used to refer to a 'pullover' as a ganzy - scratch a little and it's genser in Norwegian which translates across to guernsey which mutated into jersey.

Fascinating stuff etymology.

Solid Rust Twotter
3rd Oct 2006, 07:39
Deep down, we're all African.....:E ;)

XXTSGR
3rd Oct 2006, 10:27
A couple of references back to the first page of this thread...

G-CPTNWhat defines an Arab?Being a native speaker of arabic - that's all. Hence most Iraqis are Arabs, most Iranians are not, as they speak Farsi.

storl ternABORIGINAL" - a compound of two words; "abor" from the latin 'arbor = trees' and "original" from the latin 'originalis = existing from the beginning'
therefore aboriginal = just out of the treesComplete and utter rubbish. "Ab" = from, "Origine" = the beginning. Nothing whatsoever to do with being just come down from the trees or similar white supremacist [email protected] The word aboriginal can also refer to forests themselves, rocks, other natural formations as well as people and animals. I'm amazed your post got past the moderators. Try looking the word up in any respectable dictionary.

storl tern
3rd Oct 2006, 13:05
What's the origin of the term "hook, line and sinker"? Perhaps XX knows the answer? But yes, you are right - how did it get past the mods? I thought that I would show some solidarity with G-CPTN and see where the line was. It would appear that he might have some grounds in the future to appeal against a future ban:E I was, after all, expecting to be banned for that one!

Blacksheep
4th Oct 2006, 02:48
It was your lousy spelling that caused the bother. Its the Arboriginals who are just out of the trees.

Doesn't hook, line and sinker come from when you're out fishing and the piscene species take the pisc?