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european champion
28th Sep 2006, 09:03
I am considering doing a type rating in the states but i have warrant of arrest in a few states for tickets that i havent paid for driving offences,i got speeding tickets and various other tickets,all total approximately 2500 usd.
Does anyone know if these tickets get erased after some time?(the last one was about 4 years ago)
The reason why i ask is because i dont want to go to the states for doing a cheaper rating and be arrested for these debts and end up paying them,this way it would turn out to be an expensive trip,id rather stay in europe then and do a rating on the jaa license.

Devlin Carnet
28th Sep 2006, 13:31
No they dont get forgotten, they are there until the bailiffs turn up an repossess
all your stuff to pay them off.

airborne_artist
28th Sep 2006, 13:32
WTF were you up to? Cannon Ball Run?

I've lived in the US and I'd expect that skipping paying speeding fines would not get erased. Once found you'd be banged up and offered bail on a bond of at least 10x your fines....

So, apply for the visa, and if you get it, have $25,000 handy for the bond ....

Mr Lexx
28th Sep 2006, 13:34
There was a thing on the news about this a few months back. The chap got to immigration, got stopped when his passport was swiped, interrogated for 5 hours and then sent straight back home on the plane he arrived on. Never allowed back, persona non grata. He had no warrants for his arrest either, just the unpaid tickets. With warrants, you will probably get jailed!

You might end up with worse consequences than just having to pay the fines

slim_slag
28th Sep 2006, 14:16
Had this problem over 20 years ago when I picked up a speeding ticket when I was on holiday in California. The DMV sent all the speeding ticket documents to London California instead of London England.

Anyway, a year later I got a job out there and had to get a driving licence, when the clerk put my name in they said there were five failures to appear, and a warrant out on me and I should lay low. Managed to get to a proper judge before a copper found me and he said California DMV were idiots sometimes and halved the fixed fine for the inconvenience caused.

Went to pay the fine to the people outside the court who wondered out loud about the failures to appear. I said I didn't have a clue and the judge never brought them up, so the secretary just deleted them and the warrant from my record in front of me.

They may as well have never existed, marvellous stuff.

Taildragger67
28th Sep 2006, 14:35
Mate with the NatWest Three and others as warning, I'd be giving the Great Republic a wide berth until I'd cleared them if I woz yoo...

Maybe go to Oz, NZ or RSA instead (but don't fly on anything which goes via the US!), then pay these off if you ever want to head across the Pond!

Wouldn't be so great if you got an airline gig, pitched up to JFK on your first transatlantic and proceeded to spend your (somewhat extended) slip on Rikers Island as someone's bee-artch... :eek:

Parapunter
28th Sep 2006, 14:36
...On the other hand, I once flatshared with a guy who skipped off from Nevada without paying a speeding ticket & four months later, a warrant arrived in the post for a cour appearance in Reno IIRC.


And this was in a grotty flat in Newcastle upon Tyne. God only knows how they found him:}

Taildragger67
28th Sep 2006, 14:47
Maybe that appearance on How Clean is Your House? wasn't such a good idea...

Krystal n chips
28th Sep 2006, 15:10
C5 are currently doing a series called "Banged up Abroad"----not sure how much they pay the er, "stars" of this show---but it may come in useful ;) :E

Obviously this means that you have to go back to the US of course--and get arrested etc---a minor detail I know--but think of the fame as a TV celeb :p

Failing C5 making you an offer---you could always do a blog for us here ---make a change from speed cameras etc ! :) :E

Ontariotech
28th Sep 2006, 15:26
I would keep low even in Europe. The UK and the US do have extradition treaties. Look at the three from Scotland done in for that banking scam. Natwest I think. They were all arested and sent to Texas to face charges.:(

Just kidding.:p I would Imagine you could offer to pay the fines. Call the state offices in which you were fined and start asking questions. I would think 30 or 40 dollars in phone calls, plus the cost of the fines would sort things out. And be sure to get a receipt for the payments and letters indicating that the warrents are served and or voided. This should all be done prior to getting on an aircraft and attempting to get through Immigration at destination.

Tickets are not forgotten.

As for jail, you either pay, or go to jail. It's only traffic tickets were talking about. They only want you to pay the fines.

Davaar
28th Sep 2006, 15:30
Best of all, find a CD of Tom T Hall, "A Week in a Country Jail", and play it just the once. The bit about the "Hot polony, eggs and gravy" should do it for you.

There is a hidden solution to all this. Can you spot it?

rab-k
28th Sep 2006, 15:54
http://www.clicksmilies.com/s0105/huepfen/jumping-smiley-022.gif I KNOW, I KNOW, PICK ME, ME!!!



DON'T SET FOOT IN THE U.S. EVER AGAIN! :}




I was caught speeding by a State Trooper just outside Missoula (MT) and made the mistake of not having the $70 to pay the citation 'on the spot'. On producing my Washington State Driver's Licence and discovering that I was from "out of state", he decided to throw me in the slammer until I could produce the $70 "bail"! :eek: Like they have ATMs in jail - NOT!:\

Fortunately, I persuaded him to call his dispatch and have them call the friend I was going to visit in Missoula, who took a trip down to the Sheriff's Office and paid up, during which time I was sat in the back of his cruiser for 45 minutes. A close shave you might say, particularly given that I was also uninsured at the time - a fact which he'd failed to spot on the car rental form.:E

I'd have no doubt that the US INS would discover your outstanding misdemeanours and/or felonies at your first port of call in the US and give a nod to the nearest plod to come and chat to you.

Stay well clear would be my advice!

Loose rivets
28th Sep 2006, 15:56
Some states keep them ‘forever', best just try to get some sort of payment agreement, although each state will be a separate issue.

Don't forget that their idea of compound interest is...erm, probably higher than ‘Honest Fred's Quick Loan' somewhere in the back streets of London.

AcroChik
28th Sep 2006, 16:46
Confirming and supplementing what Lexx and others have said:

If you have bench warrants for anything outstanding in the US, be advised that under terms of the Patriots Act, local, state and federal law enforcement agencies share this data.

It WILL come up during immigration clearance on entry and there is a very good possibility that you will be arrested. Under the Patriots Act, non-citizens and non-Green Card holders (legal permanent residents) have different rights than others ~ less of them ~ and you might not even be entitled to the right of counsel in a hearing.

If, as you say, these are bench warrants for traffic offences, it is likely you can clear them up by paying them off long distance, throwing up your hands and saying the equivalent of, "I'm a foreigner, I live far away, I had no clue." It is even possible that pleading innocent ignorance in this way you might even get the record expunged ~ meaning it will be deleted from shared agency databases. But I can't promise that outcome, of course.

What I can promise is that the current data on your bench warrants is shared and will pop up at immigration. I can promise this because I called my mom and asked. She's a lawyer with a sophisticated understanding about how this works. Her quote: "Under current law, this is pretty serious."

Krystal n chips
28th Sep 2006, 17:03
Time for a little musical interlude----given your circumstances and this being JB ;)


http://www.risa.co.uk/sla/song.php?songid=19655

moosp
28th Sep 2006, 17:08
Ummm there is another angle to your concerns, european champion.

When I teach CRM and Command Responsibility courses, one of the aspects refers to anti authority attitudes, and how they are incompatible with aviation.

With your attitude to the offences, fines and warrants , which appears to be to walk away from them, I would suggest that you do not have the character type that is acceptable to Civil Aviation.

If you still choose this path, it may be wise that you never mention these actions to your interview board when you apply for a flying job. You therefore also leave yourself open to the possiblility of being later sued for withholding information at interview.

I suggest you find out how to pay these fines, remove the warrants, and start with a clean slate. Then come back to us and join the profession.

Davaar
28th Sep 2006, 17:11
My only amendment to rab's contribution is "even by accident".

One of our local scandals, as some may call it, concerns a Canadian resident who was interlining in the US. His name Came Up. Guess what!

Next thing he knew he was in a country in the Middle East, all travel, per diem, and expenses paid by Uncle Sam, for a JollyTime. Well, he was there for a Quite a While, and the good folks there were Very Vexed with him, because he Kept Denying Things. "We'll soon see about that!", they said, "Tell us when it begins to hurt".

Time went by and he Began to Lose Weight.

Eventually (so much is covered by that little word, is it not?) he was Let Go. A judicial inquiry here has concluded it was "All a Mistake". Could have happened to anyone, and "Can't He Take a Joke?"

The chap involved has no sense of humour, so it appears.

For my own part, I love the United States, but when I go there I obey their laws, and if a tall man in a cowboy hat, boots, a gun and a badge addresses me I respond repectfully.

I look on him as I would the Arizona Ranger (You do not give no lip, to the Arizona Ranger with the big iron on his hip). This is a Rule to Live By, even if he is only a dog-catcher in Vermont. Recall the fate of Texas Red (the Arizona Ranger was "... gonna take him back alive, or maybe dead; It really doesn't matter" the Ranger said. As with ol' Tex, so with you.)

As Tom T Hall says of the sheriff: "That bit about who I was did not impress him".

AcroChik
28th Sep 2006, 17:13
I wasn't going to touch that aspect.

Well said, moosp, better than I ever could.

rab-k
28th Sep 2006, 17:28
Lots of good stuff here, so I'll retract what I said earlier for this reason:

You get your type rating.
You get your 'dream job' with employer 'X'.
You forget all about upsetting the 'local law' stateside.
You get your first sector to the USA.
You get up to the desk at immigration in your uniform and smile at the INS Officer who takes your passport from you.
You get handcuffed and marched off in front of all your colleagues and a couple of hundred onlookers!
You get sacked by employer 'X' when you are eventually freed from the bonds of the US penal system.
You get deported. finPay up dude - you know it makes sense:=

BenThere
28th Sep 2006, 20:33
Another aspect is to know by which numbers the system recognizes you. Consider getting a new passport with a new number, and a new drivers' license, also with a new number. Then, you could plausibly say they must be looking for someone else with the same name.

I got a ticket for hitchhiking on a freeway in California when I was a college student in the early 70s. Of course I ignored it as I lived in Minnesota at the time. Later, when I moved to California in 1978, I was worried about that old ticket when I applied for a California license, but there was no remaining record of it. Computers and data bases have come a long way since then, though.

I think if you got new numbers and ID, you'd likely be OK. If the savings on training are worth it, and if your job might bring you back here to the states, new ID should prevent your connection from being made.

Normally, I lean toward satisfying all just debts, but I reserve a place in my heart for those who resist the speeding/parking ticket racket in place in small town America.

If you could return as a diplomat, you're immune as well.

Cheers,

AcroChik
28th Sep 2006, 20:38
Another aspect is to know by which numbers the system recognizes you. Consider getting a new passport with a new number, and a new drivers' license, also with a new number. Then, you could plausibly say they must be looking for someone else with the same name.


No doubt you mean well, Ben There (I say this based upon reading many of your previous posts), but in this case you're encouraging the fellow to engage in criminal fraud ~ a felony far more serious than his current legal issues ~ for which the statuatory penalty is years in federal prison. The Patriots Act is serious business, indeed.

BenThere
28th Sep 2006, 20:46
Well, yeah, but didn't we cross that bridge as the premise of the thread?

And he wouldn't be changing identities, just the numbers that connect his identity to the specific transgressions under consideration. If caught out, getting a new passport is not a crime, nor is getting a new drivers' license. There are legitimate reasons for doing so.

Or he could just wince and pay when confronted with irrefutable evidence.

We take our chances every day.

TBirdFrank
28th Sep 2006, 20:48
Earlier this year I came home to a letter from a firm of debt collectors in North Carolina seeking some $70 dollars from me, or inviting me to take a trip to the county court.

A little research showed it related to a stateside calling card company who's services I had ceased using a long, long, time ago after they tried overcharging me - the "debt" was the disputed overcharge.

I checked that N Carolina had a statute of limitations - it does - six years is the limit to collect a civil debt.

I then emailed the company and asked them to confirm that the debt was statute barred. I also notified them that it was also disputed, so no indebtedness was admitted.

I also said that I was happy to attend court but would add my costs to any counterclaim. UK to NC plus hotels and accomm = lots of $$

Within the hour I had an email saying that the debt had been struck out and the record expunged.

But it might have frightened the little old lady who doesn't know how to fight back

reynoldsno1
28th Sep 2006, 20:49
You might find this handy www.prisonbitchname.com/ (www.prisonbitchname.com)

rab-k
28th Sep 2006, 20:54
Another aspect is to know by which numbers the system recognizes you. Consider getting a new passport with a new number, and a new drivers' license, also with a new number. Then, you could plausibly say they must be looking for someone else with the same name.

I think if you got new numbers and ID, you'd likely be OK. If the savings on training are worth it, and if your job might bring you back here to the states, new ID should prevent your connection from being made.

Cheers,


Nice try. Your name and DoB are all that's required for a match.

Sure people can have the same name. But same name AND DoB are such long odds that more detailed enquiries would be guaranteed to expose the true I-D.

BenThere
28th Sep 2006, 21:03
Good point. I guess I'm a novice at fighting the law.

AcroChik
28th Sep 2006, 21:09
Well, yeah, but didn't we cross that bridge as the premise of the thread?

No kidding. As moosp points out in his post, in this business, some things are a matter of character.

Davaar
28th Sep 2006, 21:46
We take our chances every day.

I am sure that many here, yourself included, do not every day take our chances on flouting courts and walking away from debt, and systems have long, long, memories. We dio not need words of legal technicality like "felony", or knowlege of prosecuting systems. "Dishonest" does very well.

Metro man
28th Sep 2006, 22:56
Had a friend in a similar situation, accumulated a number of Australian speeding tickets and didn't pay the fines. He produced a foreign licence when stopped so thought there would be no comeback.

One day driving through a police road block he was pulled up for not displaying road tax, despite showing police his current tax sticker which he had left in the glove box, his name got checked and BINGO :E

G-CPTN
28th Sep 2006, 23:53
You could always TRY by writing a letter to the relevant authorities in the US, and ask them if they know of any outstanding matters that might impede your plans. Don't forget to provide them with FULL details of your current location, driver's licence, passport etc so they can give you a CLEAN bill of health.
You might want to include details of your bank accounts at the same time, in case they want to forward any 'refunds' to you . . .



You am in big sh1t, boy . . .

Ask them at the same time if they'll mind you puffing a bit weed to steady your nerves, as you intend to bring your sidearms with you, and weed calms you when you're practising your aim. :ugh:

Two's in
29th Sep 2006, 00:10
Only try it if you are into stripey uniforms and all the rough sex you could ever want from your new girl "Bubba". They'll get you, plain and simple, and in these days where Habeas Corpus seems to be taking a back seat, God knows where you could end up.

Davaar
29th Sep 2006, 01:22
Mind you, there is a healthy open-air element to it too. I recall a group of country workers by the roadside in Louisiana, I think it was. The leg irons and chain did seem like irritants, but they did not really impede movement. Lots of sunshine on the job, no snow, not far from the ocean, and a man in charge who looked very interested in his work. People pay good money for those conditions.

rab-k
29th Sep 2006, 11:47
Mind you, there is a healthy open-air element to it too. I recall a group of country workers by the roadside in Louisiana, I think it was. The leg irons and chain did seem like irritants, but they did not really impede movement. Lots of sunshine on the job, no snow, not far from the ocean, and a man in charge who looked very interested in his work. People pay good money for those conditions.

Sometimes buxom blondes even wash their cars by the roadside and get both you and themselves all in a lather.:eek:

http://www.briansdriveintheater.com/cheesecake/joyharmon/joyharmon1thumb.jpg "Taking ma shirt off here Boss!":}

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!
29th Sep 2006, 12:13
I hope you do come over, because if you do you will get discovered, detained, required to pay the outstanding bill and then deported. Once deported, you wil not be allowed back in the country.

The reason I feel this way is not because you are lying to the authorities, but because you are lying to us. Perhaps you lie to everyone?. You casually mention "various other tickets" but you stress driving offences and speeding, and then you mention the total is a staggering $2500. Either (1) you committed an inordinately large number of motoring offences, or (2) they predominantly involve offences other than driving. Drugs perhaps? Do you have a drug habit? Were you found in possession of controlled substances?

In any event, perhaps you should consider a different line of work: one that requires a little less personal integrity.

rab-k
29th Sep 2006, 12:37
In any event, perhaps you should consider a different line of work: one that requires a little less personal integrity.


Ouch - http://www.clicksmilies.com/s0105/teufel/devil-smiley-029.gif (http://www.pprune.org/forums/%5Bimg%5Dhttp://www.clicksmilies.com/s0105/teufel/devil-smiley-029.gif%5B/img%5D)Flame-grilled-whopper anyone?

I'd be most interested to hear from 'Euro-Champ' as to what he will do having read all of our posts.

So, whad'ya'gonna do then chief?

slim_slag
29th Sep 2006, 12:42
Oh for God's sake. Cut this moral superiority BS. Don't tell me we all pay our speeding tickets because we are good people, we pay them because the alternative is a bigger fine and if you don't pay those you go to jail. He thought he could get away with it, he rolled the dice, and it looks like he has lost. Big time.

If he pays up he will more than likely get a clean bill of health from the US authorities. They don't think he is a bad person, they just want his money. Once he gives them the money they won't care about it anynore, so why should we?

Davaar
29th Sep 2006, 12:55
1. Once he gives them the money they won't care about it anynore,

2. so why should we?

1. Has he suggested paying the money?

2. Because it is a topic here, and he asked the question. The word "care" overstates it. I hope he comes over.

slim_slag
29th Sep 2006, 13:55
No, I don't believe he has offered to pay. I think the best advice he has obtained from this splendid thread is take it on the chin and pay up. The worst advice is that he is some sort of moral reprobate, not fit to wash the feet of those who seem to think they are somehow special.

WhatsaLizad?
29th Sep 2006, 14:25
The problem is in this case is this person behaved legally in the first place.
Most likely a valid passport/visa or drivers license was displayed and maybe along with other documents such as a rental car receipt or car registration.
Once you provide an easy way for the system to track you, you're screwed if you try to flee from any fines.

In the future, just respond in some foreign language that you don't have any ID or passport, no insurance on the vehicle and you don't know whose it is. Give a fake name also.If he ask if your an illegal alien, say "yes" and "so what". Even better yet if you have 15 others in your car with the same response. The cops in most US cities are forbidden from detaining anyone who is an illegal immigrant.:ugh: Rip up the citation and throw it out the window when the cop is finished with you. Next, rip up the littering citation (throw on car floor to avoid further delay)


Good luck

Davaar
29th Sep 2006, 14:50
He might add:

1. Do you think I am some some sort of moral reprobate, for Goodness sake?
2. I suppose you think I am not fit to wash your stinking (insert "American" if he feels really adventurous) feet?
3. Do you think you are somehow special?

slim_slag
29th Sep 2006, 15:24
Bravo, Davaar, Bravo!

I suspect the cop wouldn't care. He would simply tick the "infraction" box, and subtract one from the number of additional tickets he needed to give that month in order to reach his quota.

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!
30th Sep 2006, 03:41
No, I don't believe he has offered to pay.He hasn't. In fact, quite the contrary, he asked for help in avoiding to pay.

The reason why i ask is because i dont want to go to the states for doing a cheaper rating and be arrested for these debts and end up paying them :yuk:

How would you feel if a guest in your country behaved like this?

Daysleeper
30th Sep 2006, 06:07
My 2p worth, the immigration hold tank is NOT a pleasant place to be. Operated into the East coast one day on an off again on again charter. In the confusion over whether it was going to happen our handlers had forgotten to tell INS we were coming in.
Talk about no sense of humour. Took them 3 hours to decide we were idiots and not terrorists. Wouldn't let me use my mobile to call my ops to call the handlers, wouldn't let me use THEIR phone to call the handlers, wouldn't call them for me - "thats not my job".
In the end to get out I had to sign some form or other but the form was only avaliable "landside." When I asked if I could go and get it they wouldn't let me over the line into the country without it and wouldn't go and get it for us.:(

I think what I'm trying to say is sort it out before you go to the states, your options for negotiation are limited once they hold your ass as collateral.

Crossword
30th Sep 2006, 10:33
And then sanity crept in.

- Average time from traffic violation (ticket) to scheduled Court appearance is approx 2 months.
- Standard procedure in a vehicle stop is to run name/DOB/drivers license/tag numbers thru the computer for outstanding warrants. If you failed to pay the ticket there would be a warrant.
- If you had an outstanding warrant you would have been arrested. Might have missed you once but not that many times.

Therefore, it appears you were in the country 2-3 months or less.

You state you have approx $2500 worth of tickets.

- Approx cost of an individual speeding ticket is $100 - $150 (assuming less than 15 MPH over speed limit).
- Speed in excess of 15 MPH over limit requires a mandatory Court appearance as the charge isn’t speeding, it is “Reckless Driving”, and has considerably stiffer penalties.

You appear to have commited 15-20 violations in less than 2 months unless some were of the Reckless Driving variety.

- You did not:
1) Waive trial and prepay the fines or
2) Show up for your hearing/trial.

You must therefore add the additional charges of “Failure to Appear” to each of those violations. That charge normally involves jail time. Congratulations, you are now an admitted criminal.

Amazing that you are concerned about being able to get a Type Rating when your gross irresponsibility/misconduct is going to be your limiting factor as a professional.

- Irresponsible enough to get the tickets in the first place.
- Irresponsible in not paying them.
- Irresponsible/criminal behavior in not honouring your commitment to appear in Court if you chose not to pay the fines (Have another read of the words on the tickets. You are technically on bail in your own recognizance).

In short, you will not even get through the background check for your visa and should consider yourself lucky the US authorities have bigger fish to fry or you could be extradited, stand trial(s), and spend time in jail(s).

I suggest you start looking into the meaning of the phrase “pre-employment background check”. Countries exchange this type of information these days.
iven the points expressed in your original post you do not have the requisite character and non-criminal background to hold any responsible job much less be a professional pilot.

Good luck with your company background check in wherever country you intend to fly.

G-CPTN
30th Sep 2006, 10:43
Sheesh! Those US Law-enforcement guys seem to be short on sense-of-humour (or sens of hoomor?).
It's only $2500! That's hardly going to keep the US Economy afloat, is it?

Crossword
30th Sep 2006, 10:51
G-CPTN missed the point? Colour me amazed.

G-CPTN
30th Sep 2006, 10:56
No, not at all.
It was (meant to be) irony.
There's no way I would attempt to avoid justice (once detected, that is).
As a UK resident (who's never been Stateside) I find the accounts frightening.

I find European Champion's attitude unbelievable. Perhaps he's from the Netherlands, where weed is freely available and (s)he's still using?

OTOH, (s)he's not responded, so maybe it's just a wind-up?

Re-entry
30th Sep 2006, 12:02
dude. do not set foot there until everything is sorted. You WILL go to the clink.

lexxity
30th Sep 2006, 12:56
The INS have zero sense of humour, one of our cabin staff got thrown in the "holding cell" for having the "wrong" finger print. His finger print on his right (IIRC) hand matched that of a terrorist. He had just operated into the US, he was in uniform and he did have his current visa. He wasn't allowed to contact anyone, not even the Captain of the flight he had just operated. The rest of the crew were left at the bus wondering what the heck had happened to him.

He was eventually sorted out when someone saw sense, but it took ages. Just think how long it would take to sort out your speeding fines.:\

Davaar
30th Sep 2006, 13:28
Bravo, Davaar, Bravo!
I suspect the cop wouldn't care. .

"Bravo!", you say. I suspect the cop would care.

I have been stopped once only for speeding in the US. I was driving from the prairies to Eastern Canada through Minnesota, Wisconsin, and south of the Lakes, a long trip, and the speed "crept up" (notice the attractive impersonal verb form) a little.

Then came the flashing lights. It was night time. I pulled over, stopped, leaned forward and put both my hands prominently on top of the dash board, right by the windshield, and waited. A man shone a bright flash-light beam on me through the driver's window. He was wearing the mandatory cowboy hat but with a flat brim. He tapped on the window, which I opened.

He was very polite, and suggested that I had been going over the limit. "Yes, officer", I said, "I fear you are quite right. It crept up on me". "Yeah", he said. I did and do believe he had already checked my (up-to-date) licence sticker on the rear plate.

He was anxious to see my driving licence and insurance certificate, and I thought: "I've got the time at my disposal. Why not indulge this good man's whim?"; so I did. He read them with care, and then allowed that this sort of contretemps between me and the Great State of Minn or Wis could readily be resolved by the payment of money. How did I feel about that?

"How much?", I asked, and "Do you take a check (I meant "cheque", but mentally I moved into US spelling) or major credit cards or cash". I think we settled on a check or credit card, which I gave him.

"Thank you", he said, as he gave me a receipt, "Keep the speed down, Sir, and have a good day". "Yes", I said, "Thank you". It seemed to be called for, and to make him happy.

I was a manifestly peaceable bourgeois middle-aged man driving a late-model Benz 300, not a Stingray or a hot-rod or anything jazzy.

I add that last paragraph because as I put my wallet away my peripheral vision caught a movement in the dark on the passenger's side of the car. It was my chap's mate, and he was holding a large hand-gun, pointing at me.

I offer again Tom T Hall, the week in the country jail, and the hot polony, eggs and gravy. In the song, he had not liked the hot p., e., and g. at first but as the days wore on he began to look forward to it.

I suppose, slim, this makes me a Holy Willie, Holier Than Thou, whatever. Well, I have seen the inside of jails, but never as a resident. Go take a look. Since that incident, if they have a rule in the US, and I am in the US, I live by that rule. I do the highway driving on cruise control most of the time.

When the fellow who started this thread does visit the US, and does spend his time in jail, as he will, and eventually gets out, he will no doubt give us all an entertaining narrative.

G-CPTN
30th Sep 2006, 13:34
as I put my wallet away my peripheral vision caught a movement in the dark on the passenger's side of the car. It was my chap's mate, and in his hand he was holding a large hand-gun, and that gun was pointing at me.
Well, they do now say (in the UK) that MAJOR felons are often caught due to minor misdemeanours. It seems that those who consider major crimes acceptable also consider minor laws and regulations irrelevant, so catch a speeder and you might net a mass murderer.
That's what they say . . .

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!
30th Sep 2006, 13:45
I got a ticket once and at the end of the proceedings the policeman thanked me for being cooperative. I managed to avoid pointing out that it had hardly done me any good as I still had the ticket, but I held on to my poinions.

I settled that ticket and have no outstanding warrants.

EchoMike
30th Sep 2006, 13:55
Pay up and it will (eventually) all go away.

I'm in FL, teach ground school here, my wife is an attorney.

Student from Germany got into a disagreement with a local police officer with predictable results - he got bopped on the head with a nightstick and shoved into the back of a police car. When he (later) showed his German passport, the policeman issued a "notice to appear" (which is actually what a speeding ticket is - they want you to show up in court) and released him.

"Hey, isn't your wife a lawyer here?"

"Yes."

"Well I have a problem . . . "

He went through the same thing, "what if I ignore it all?", and was advised if he *EVER* came back to the US of A, he'd go directly to jail because he had an outstanding warrant for failure to appear.

Since he did need to come back, he retained my wife the lawyer to clear this up.

Result - $130+ in fines to the City of Daytona Beach, plus legal fees (special deal, under $1,000, which was a REAL BARGAIN!!), plus he had to write a letter to the arresting officer (!) saying he was sorry he accidentally got blood on the officer's nightstick by banging his head into it repeatedly and promised never to do it again. This letter went to the Prosecutor as well, and since in the opinion of the Prosecutor he showed adequate contrition, the matter was then null prossed (which is legalese for dropped), case closed.

In a few months, his Florida lawyer is going to move to have his record expunged, and then it will all be gone for good.

Morals:

Try to behave in the first place. You would not argue with an armed officer at home, why think you can do it here?

Be respectful, contrite and cooperative at ALL times, practice saying Yes, Sir and No Sir (or m'am, as the case may be) - much of this is a judgement call on the part of the officer, and if you give them a hard time - for WHATEVER reason - they will return your attitude to you a thousandfold - they are well used to dealing with dirtballs (some of whom are dangerous) and know quite well how to effectively handle them - your job is to convince the officer that YOU are a good guy, did not and do not intend to cause any problems at all, and are truly sorry for your accidental transgression. Often this attitude gets you off with just a warning, and sometimes, not even a written warning. Sometimes a little ass-kissing goes a long way. If you are driving drunk, all bets are off, you're going to jail.

Computers never forget - ever. Once you are in the computer - for anything - you MUST fix the problem - and computers talk to each other, so ALL the computers know someone is looking for you - and thus everyone is looking for you.

The wheels of justice grind slow, but they grind exceedingly fine.

The USA isn't a police state by any means, so don't be afraid to visit. Just like at home, you have to be prepared to play by the rules, or you'll get into trouble.

Best Regards,

Echo Mike

G-CPTN
30th Sep 2006, 13:55
I got a ticket once and at the end of the proceedings the policeman thanked me for being cooperative. I managed to avoid pointing out that it had hardly done me any good as I still had the ticket, but I held on to my poinions.
And you still had your freedom and your LIFE. HAD you been UN - cooperative (and made a run for it) things might have ended differently.

Keef
30th Sep 2006, 21:58
My daughter got stopped for speeding in Utah, driving a friend's car. She was fairly pregnant at the time. She produced her (Welsh language) driving licence, which led to a conversation between the policeman and the car owner (in the other seat) which went along the lines of "I don't know what language this is, and I don't want to know, and your friend doesn't look like an international criminal, so tell her to drive slower."

"Diolch yn fawr", replied Anna. "And you" replied the policeman.

G-CPTN
30th Sep 2006, 22:07
That was probably just a lucky guess . . .

As a youngster I 'trained' myself to respond to certain phrases with programmed responses. For example, any mention of deafness will prompt a "Pardon?"
Likewise, a comment that is misheard or not understood CAN produce a response of "And your mother - and your grandmother too!", so I reckon the Trooper was just reacting in 'programmed mode'. He'd probably had obscenities directed towards him in various languages, and it's easy to reflect it back onto the perpetrator. If it happens to be a pleasantry, well then there's no loss, and no offense caused. The fact that she was being gracious and thanking him is covered by the latter situation. He's hardly likely to re-open a situation where hes decided 'no action' UNLESS he's in a position of CONTROL (ie he understands what is being said).

TBirdFrank
30th Sep 2006, 22:10
and that means? - it's like being in Llanwrst again

G-CPTN
30th Sep 2006, 22:28
She was fairly pregnant at the time.
The possibilities are endless :E

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!
30th Sep 2006, 23:02
it's like being in Llanwrst againis that a type of saussage?

Davaar
30th Sep 2006, 23:28
"Diolch yn fawr", replied Anna. "And you" replied the policeman.

I digress. Many years ago I heard the late Rev Murdo Ewen Macdonald tell of his time as a POW in Germany. He was a British padre with, as I recall, the 51st Highland Division. His first language had been Gaelic.

Possession of a radio was a capital offence, but there were some clandestine receivers in the camp. Gaelic speaking prisoners would shout Gaelic summaries of the BBC news from compound to compound. The Germans were puzzled by this unknown language, had not a clue of what was going on under their very noses.

The Commandant of the camp was a gentleman of the Old Imperial Army, well regarded by all, and he asked Mr Macdonald to teach him English. He agreed (The Commandant had heard that the King James Bible contained the purest English, as the Luther Bibel the purest German, so they studied from that: "How art Thou?" "Verily, verily, I say unto Thee, I am very well today").

The lessons were going well, when one day the Commandant remarked that the camp was having a special guest the next day, and invited Mr Macdonald to take coffee with him and the guest. He was surprised but pleased.

Next day the coffee went well, the conversation in English and some German, general chit-chat about the food, the conditions, welfare, not easy to maintain standards in these difficult times of course, how is the prisoners' morale?, and so on. As I recall over the years, the visitor was very gracious, in civilian clothes, but obviously an officer and a German.

After a while it was clear that the meeting was over, with Mr Macdonald still unaware of the reasons for having it.

As they shook hands, the visitor told Mr Macdonald it had been a great pleasure to meet him and wished him well.

By the way, there came as an afterthought, the authorities did rather suspect -- and he was sure this would astonish Mr Macdonald! -- that some prisoners had radio receivers in use in the camp ..... not, again, that Mr Macdonald would know anything of that .... and he hoped they were well hidden.

Mind you, he said, he did rather think he could lay his hands on them in two minutes if he had to.

It would be such a tragedy if a foolish guard were to stumble on them, things got out of control, and that led to any unfortunate and unnecessary executions .... Would it not?

The entire afterthought was in native-fluent Gaelic.

Selbstverstaendlich! Auf Wiedersehen! Herr Pastor!

european champion
5th Oct 2006, 10:44
Thank you everyone for taking the time to give me your opinion.For some people who might be thinking that i had serious offences(drugs...) the reply is NO,not even drinking,all the offences are minor(driving with no seatbelt,parking in front of handicapped signs,speeding,using emergency lane on motorway during traffic,using pedestrian way,parking the car facing opposite way...) and they have been made during one year in various states while travelling.
I heard some terrifying stories from some of you about people being deported or caught abroad and thrown to jail for owing money,i do not doubt them,they could be true but i have also heard that in usa,even though their law is quite strict(not the most liberate country in the world) their system keeps these kind of records for minor offences(e.g driving violations...) for a maximum 4 years,after these 4 years if they havent caught the person then the offence and warrant of arrest is being deleted.Im not 100% sure about this,i will double check with a lawyer,i will get some contacts of lawyers who are specialist in these matters from the us embassy in my country.

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!
5th Oct 2006, 11:54
well then come on over. we'd love to have you . . .

Ozzy
5th Oct 2006, 12:13
"Hey, isn't your wife a layer here?" Well is she? Nudge, nudge, wink, wink, say no more, say no MORE?:E :E

Ozzy

AcroChik
5th Oct 2006, 14:13
european champion, I second A...rgh's words. Come on over, find out what happens when there's an outstanding warrant for your arrest. Make a holiday of it.

EchoMike
5th Oct 2006, 14:16
Well is she? Nudge, nudge, wink, wink, say no more, say no MORE?:E :E

Ozzy


Arrgh. Freudian typo fixed - and I guess that's the end of my 10% courtesy discount on legal work if she ever sees it . . .

Best Regards,

Echo Mike

er340790
5th Oct 2006, 14:57
Some years back I got stopped by a State Trooper for speeding (really speeding) in South Carolina on a Thanksgiving Sunday morning.

Had a brand new rented Ford Thunderbird - the rental firm were out of sub-compacts - and succumbed to temptation on a deserted dual carriageway somewhere between Columbia and Greenville. The speedo was around 120 mph, but Fords always exaggerated, didn't they?

You know the score, plain white car with flashing lights about a mile behind. This was in the days of 55mph. I pulled over, shitting myself with hands in clear view. The trooper was very professional but looked like something straight out of the (old) Dukes of Hazzard, complete with huge baton / gun / hat / shouty voice etc.

Worse thing was I couldn't get out. The T/bird had an insane seatbelt where you had to undo the shoulder belt before the separate lap belt. The trooper was at the window asking 'do you have some kind of problem in there?'

Eventually I got free. After telling him my licence was in the 'boot', the trooper was sure, not unreasonably, that he was dealing with some kind of alien retard. He asked me how much cash I had on me (just $2 honestly) then threatened to throw me into jail until the County Judge was in and the banks opened on Monday for driving at 105mph. (Thank God for Ford speedos!)

Only thing I could recall was my US-resident cousin's advice to be nice to them. You know, call them 'officer', what a great car it was, what a great country etc etc etc. After a 20 minutes lecture on the dangers of speeding, all I got was a warning ticket to 'AVOID THOUGHTLESS VIOLATIONS'. I still have it framed on the wall.

Met my US colleagues in Greenville later who just could not believe I'd talked my way out of it. One of them had had 2 days in lock-up and huge fine for an 80 mph encounter the previous year.

Still, great car, great country!

european champion
5th Oct 2006, 22:12
I have always been polite to them also,even though i was not using the words 'great car,great country' some of them have been nice and i was let go a few times.

G-CPTN
5th Oct 2006, 22:26
You mean, there was MORE?

AcroChik
5th Oct 2006, 22:35
Amazing, isn't it? Our hero's now posting his erotic fantasies over in the Muslim Women and the Veil thread. Must be a brilliant guy to share a cockpit with ~ his CRM skills are probably second to none.

And, yes, moderators, this could be construed as an ad hominem remark.

european champion
6th Oct 2006, 10:01
Acrochic please dont mix the two subjects,the veil that muslim girls wear has nothing to do with this topic.Also i dont see myself as a hero,i dont know how u got this impression,i am just stating the facts and ask people's opinion.
Yes there was a few more offences,i paid some of them as far as i found it logical to do so.

parabellum
6th Oct 2006, 10:58
European Champion - Are you not the Bee's Knees? Champion of what I am tempted to ask, certainly nothing obvious, to be sure.

You have been given the benefit of legal advice from the USA, from Aero Chic's Mum, worth hundreds of dollars and the benefit of the experiences of USA residents who have considerable knowledge of 'the system', yet you still say you think you may know better and are prepared to spend money on lawyers to find out if a theory you have, which has already been disproved, is worth following up! You have quite happily displayed an attitude that beggars belief, you went to the USA, knew you were only on a temporary visit so chose to ignore any of the Guest country's laws that didn't suit you, regardless of the fact that most of your infractions were a danger to life. And you have the gall to suggest that some of your offences were 'illogical'?

Now, here you are on a Professional Pilots Bulletin Board asking for advice on how to escape justice. You don't sound, to me, like anyone I would want to share the sky with, let alone a flight deck.

You come across as a most dishonest and dishonourable person who has totally ignored the advice that you should pay up, do the right thing,
be a man perhaps?

Having read Um.....Liftings post (loved every word!), combined with all the others in a similar vein I do believe you should now proceed direct to the USA, do not pass go and be prepared to pay, at the very least, $2,500 and your virginity to those deprived lads in the down town jail.

Mudfoot
6th Oct 2006, 11:15
Got "flashed" in Hamburg, Germany some years ago - my colleague was driving my rental car a bit too fast. Returned to the 'states, found an additional €75 on my charge card from the car rental company. How considerate... :{

lexxity
6th Oct 2006, 13:17
Tell you what European Champion how about I get you a cheap ticket to the states? The only condition is I get to come along and watch them throw you in the County clink.

You have had advice from a US lawyer and you still choose to blithley ignore the good advice given to you.

Sure we all do stupid things when we are young, but those of us who wish to become adult own up to and if possible rectify those mistakes, it's called growing up, something you seem unable to do. You will never get a job with any airline with your irresponsible attitude.

Davaar
6th Oct 2006, 13:55
Tell you what European Champion how about I get you a cheap ticket to the states? .

I'd contribute, no great expense after all, since it would be one-way only. Still, I do hope all this negative commentary does not deter him. The legal profession has a technical term that fits him: a "dripping roast".

european champion
6th Oct 2006, 14:34
To these ones who get too hot i still thank you for your comments,i find them honest and a bit amusing.
Anyway lets not critisize behaviour or act like pilot psychologists,lets stick to the subject which is the us law concerning driving violations.
I m not going to pay any lawyer,im just doing a research and seeking for free advice.Whoever claims to be a lawyer or knows the law regarding these matters can you please enlighten me as to how long exactly are these records being kept and the warrant of arrest being valid?Does that mean if i come back in usa after 30 years they will come throw me in jail?If yes why do they erase the records of people who owe money to credit cards after 4 years even if they owe thousands of dollars?(anyone from the usa should know that,unless you dont know your own country's law)Is the driving offence really such a crime then and oweing lots of thousands of dollars on credits or declare bancrupt and suck employees without compensation or showing offensive shows like jerry springer live on tv is not?

brickhistory
6th Oct 2006, 15:14
If yes why do they erase the records of people who owe money to credit cards after 4 years even if they owe thousands of dollars?(anyone from the usa should know that,unless you dont know your own country's law).....

Is the driving offence really such a crime then and oweing lots of thousands of dollars on credits or declare bancrupt and suck employees without compensation or showing offensive shows like jerry springer live on tv is not?


Well, for starters, most of us don't know the applicable laws because we choose not to break them. Or if we do, we own up to our actions and take responsibility for them. Sounds as if that is not one of your strong points.

You are welcome to visit anytime and feel free to break our laws just because you don't think they apply to you. May I have the same dispensation when visiting your country?

AcroChik
6th Oct 2006, 16:39
Whoever claims to be a lawyer

I don't.

... or knows the law regarding these matters can you please enlighten me as to how long exactly are these records being kept and the warrant of arrest being valid?

If there's a warrant out for your arrest, you will be arrested. Statutes of limitation have been radically changed under the new Patriots Act for reasons of "national security."

Does that mean if i come back in usa after 30 years they will come throw me in jail?

Yes, and it will be a federal lockup, and you may not have the right to counsel under the current law, as you will be in the custody of the INS.

If yes why do they erase the records of people who owe money to credit cards after 4 years even if they owe thousands of dollars?(anyone from the usa should know that,unless you dont know your own country's law)

The clear, obvious difference is that the credit card default and failure to appear before the bar on charges issued by a GOVERNMENT are different acts entirely. By the way, the credit card default appears on one's credit report (again a company not a government) for seven years.

Is the driving offence really such a crime...

It's a violation of government regulations, not a failure to perform contract terms between you and a company.

... then and oweing lots of thousands of dollars on credits or declare bancrupt and suck employees without compensation or showing offensive shows like jerry springer live on tv is not?

Oh my.


I might not have an airline career, but as an instructor I'm obliged to be familiar with the regs. I'd planned to look up the exact language on Form 8500-9, but Um... lifting... beat me to it. Good job!

Lexxity, put me down for ten bucks to help buy this boy a ticket to the land of the free.

We have an expression here, "What doesn't kill you, is lunch." Our hero's looking more and more like ham and cheese on rye toast all the time :p

Thanks all for your kind words.

Krystal n chips
6th Oct 2006, 17:50
If you do decide the visit the US, can I er, have the copyright and distribution rights to the video documentary I could make on your behalf --so to speak----think of it as one of those old fashioned public service announcements but updated a bit--with a touch of the human interest angle thrown in as well :E

Davaar
6th Oct 2006, 19:01
I think you underestimate the potentialities, Krystal. See if you can get full commercial rights and then combine tickets for the mise en scene with a booking for a bash with commentary by Acro and others (modesty forbids) and there should be a fair pot in this. Tickets for "The Confrontation" would sell like hot-cakes.

This sparks memories. A few student lads in a tiny UK Ford visited the Fatherland in 1954. At Cologne the car was forced open and my very inexpensive Kodak Retinette (just good enough to have a number) was stolen. I shared my sense of loss with a policeman. Well, said he, he was just a traffic policeman, like; the blokes I wanted were the Kriminalpolizei, the KRIPO, as in Gestapo (ask me, they were one and the same).

Along I trotted, teenaged British student looking for his cheap camera, to a place that could have fitted well into any spy movie, 1941 through 1946, plain clothes and just as plain faces. "Setzen-Sie sich! Bitte!" said my man. I leapt to obey. I told him my story. He asked for my address, which I gave. He spoke pretty good English. He looked me in the eye. "Ve vill return your camera". "Oh sure!" thought I.

A year ran by, came a letter from the Oberstaatsanwalt Koeln. "Sehr geehrter Herr Davaar", he frothed, we have your fotoapparat gefunden. Please send PO for 10/- post and packing and we shall return it. I sent the money. He returned the camera.

I do suspect the Department of Homeland Security will be as good as my pals in the former FRG (maybe not! what fun to gamble on it! and not just the once, but every time he lines up at US Immigration!), and on the form European already boasts, right now, he would be well advised to retrain as a camel driver. What an exciting life lies ahead for him.

Krystal n chips
6th Oct 2006, 19:35
Given your occupation Davaar, what, er percentage were you thinking of for handling the legal issues concerning distribution etc?--------helps to know in advance ;) :)

Solid Rust Twotter
6th Oct 2006, 19:41
You are welcome to visit anytime and feel free to break our laws just because you don't think they apply to you. May I have the same dispensation when visiting your country?

They lock you up in Greece just for wearing an anorak and looking at aeroplanes, mate!;)

AcroChik
6th Oct 2006, 19:43
I remember reading about those spotters. We live in tense times.

Davaar
6th Oct 2006, 19:57
, what, er percentage

This one would be pro bono. Well.... almost pro bono.

G-CPTN
6th Oct 2006, 20:56
http://msnbcmedia.msn.com/j/msnbc/Components/Photos/040122/040122_vmed_bono_915.widec.jpg

:confused:

rab-k
6th Oct 2006, 21:11
This thread is turning into a http://pageresources.tripod.com/animations/cartoonanim/anim122.gif

E-C, Just don't drop the soap ;)

Bluesteel705
6th Oct 2006, 21:14
You are welcome to visit anytime and feel free to break our laws just because you don't think they apply to you. May I have the same dispensation when visiting your country?

Yeah.... but would you want to leave the USA? Its just not safe on the outside man!!! See, I heard theres these invisible bloodsucking ghosts................ :E

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!
7th Oct 2006, 00:03
Just don't drop the soap that's why they use powdered soap, it takes so much longer to scoop up :}

Krystal n chips
7th Oct 2006, 03:37
This one would be pro bono. Well.... almost pro bono.

Ah, I like the almost bit----altruism + legal profession ---shurely shome mishtake ;) :)

mcgoo
12th Oct 2006, 18:17
european champion, you should have followed this guide to avoid tickets

http://video.google.co.uk/videoplay?docid=4961165717378550511&q=chris+rock

noflow
12th Oct 2006, 20:18
Thank you everyone for taking the time to give me your opinion.For some people who might be thinking that i had serious offences(drugs...) the reply is NO,not even drinking,all the offences are minor(driving with no seatbelt,parking in front of handicapped signs,speeding,using emergency lane on motorway during traffic,using pedestrian way,parking the car facing opposite way...) and they have been made during one year in various states while travelling.


Some of us don't care for people who feel they are above the rules. If you were being considered for employment at my company I would recommend against hiring you. You show a pattern of acting like you're above the rules. Parking in a handicapped spot is particularly annoying. I've got a friend who is paralyzed and in a wheelchair. I've pushed him half a bloody kilometer up a hill because someone who just didn't want to walk took the handicapped space. Now we have many soldiers returning from the Irag war that are condemned to a wheelchair. I just can't fathom why someone would take their parking spot on account of convenience. And of course there's granny who needs to roll her O2 canister alongside her and can't cover any great distance. Why do people think the handicapped should suffer so they don't have to walk a few minutes? Really. It's just annoying.

You do all this stuff and then you don't even take responsibility by paying the associated fines. What does that say about you as a person?

Assume I'm on the pilot interviewing committee. How would you respond to what I just outlined?

To me it sounds like you've got some growing up to do and I wouldn't trust you with one of our multi-million dollar aircraft when you've made it clear you can't be trusted with a simple car. I can't speak for the folks that do the hiring at all airlines but when we interview someone we look to see if they take responsibility for their mistakes. We've hired people with a variety of different skeletons in their closets. But every one of them took responsibility for what they did and found a way to learn from it.

noflow
12th Oct 2006, 20:25
Since I noticed a few of you telling "how I got this ticket" stories here's one for you. I was pulled over one night in Germany for some minor transgression. I decided to be somewhat creative in my response to the ever polite Politzei Offizier. In an attempt to get off with a warning I told him in my best hochdeutsch that I was leaving the country to go home in a matter of days. The plan backfired. He proceeded to confiscate my passport and informed me I would have to pay the fine immediately. I didn't have enough cash on me so I had to make arrangements to meet him in an hour or so to reclaim my passport. So much for being clever. Fortunately that was my only official encounter with foreign law enforcement.

AcroChik
13th Oct 2006, 00:04
Some of us don't care for people who feel they are above the rules. If you were being considered for employment at my company I would recommend against hiring you. You show a pattern of acting like you're above the rules. Parking in a handicapped spot is particularly annoying. I've got a friend who is paralyzed and in a wheelchair. I've pushed him half a bloody kilometer up a hill because someone who just didn't want to walk took the handicapped space. Now we have many soldiers returning from the Irag war that are condemned to a wheelchair. I just can't fathom why someone would take their parking spot on account of convenience. And of course there's granny who needs to roll her O2 canister alongside her and can't cover any great distance. Why do people think the handicapped should suffer so they don't have to walk a few minutes? Really. It's just annoying.
You do all this stuff and then you don't even take responsibility by paying the associated fines. What does that say about you as a person?
Assume I'm on the pilot interviewing committee. How would you respond to what I just outlined?
To me it sounds like you've got some growing up to do and I wouldn't trust you with one of our multi-million dollar aircraft when you've made it clear you can't be trusted with a simple car. I can't speak for the folks that do the hiring at all airlines but when we interview someone we look to see if they take responsibility for their mistakes. We've hired people with a variety of different skeletons in their closets. But every one of them took responsibility for what they did and found a way to learn from it.

We may have had differences elsewhere, noflow, but I have to give credit where credit is due :ok: :ok:

I emphatically agree that this is quite simply a matter of character.

noflow
13th Oct 2006, 01:48
We may have had differences elsewhere, noflow, but I have to give credit where credit is due :ok: :ok:

I emphatically agree that this is quite simply a matter of character.

Most of our differences were the result of me not logging off when I should have. Remember to sign off.

Fly safe and I hope there is no kneejerk reaction effecting your VFR airspace.

AcroChik
13th Oct 2006, 10:30
Most of our differences were the result of me not logging off when I should have.

Would that be after the seventh or eighth Jack Daniels? :p

Remember to sign off.

Last famous words at FI.

Fly safe and I hope there is no kneejerk reaction effecting your VFR airspace.

Sadly, reason and politics have a merely tangential relationship and the noise-machine is in full swing. Maybe I should move to Texas?



Just kidding, CP.

rab-k
13th Oct 2006, 16:03
Talking to my x-boss, a Federal Officer of the Law Enforcement variety, he believes that on arrival in the U.S., IF EC's name came up, the law enforcement agencies who were holding the bench warrants for his failure to pay up/appear would be contacted and asked if they were willing to collect EC, from whichever port of entry into the US he was being held, for subsequent transportation back to the State/County/City jurisdiction of the court issuing the warrant.

Even if they were not prepared to come and get him, he would still be subject to deportation by the INS, (without appeal), as an "undesirable" and his passport/record marked accordingly. Future entry into the U.S would be denied - permanently!

G-CPTN
13th Oct 2006, 17:31
I can't wait! :D

Davaar
13th Oct 2006, 19:15
Many people seem to infer from American informality that the Americans are sloppy. That is a mistake. The boss may call the doorman Tom and the doorman may call the boss Bill, but neither misunderstands the position of the other. The latest crop of Nobel prizes does not come from sloppy.

In the British forces many years ago there was a tale of an RAF pilot who in emergency had to make an uninvited landing at a USAF base. It may have been a SAC base. Something of that nature.

He was short of documents of identity, but he was allowed to remain there until he was collected the next day. Allowed to remain, that is, in the cockpit of his aircraft under guard. Maybe it was apocryphal, but it was certainly understood to be true.

At the end of the Civil War the Federal forces liberated a white carpenter from a Southern jail where he had been a guest for 30 years. He had gone from Massachusetts to work on a mansion house. There he had met a house slave girl who was 1/32 black, which meant 100% black at law. They fell in love. Marriage was impossible so they eloped. They were caught. She was sold into the slave market "down the river". He went to jail under the abetting a fugitive slave laws. Of course that has all changed now. Yeah.

The United States is huge to an extent that Europeans do not comprehend, and you can very soon be in a different century as well as a different place. Of course there are spots like that in Britain.

It is too bad that on his US trips the Champion never went to upper New York State. One look from the outside at the penitentiary at Dannemora is enough to convince anyone to be a very good boy. The thought of the inside is insupportable.

Flightdeckone
15th Aug 2007, 01:19
Well said Moosp. Amazing that this chappie is even seeking advise on this. Grow up Europeanchampion, pay your fines-YOU KNOW ITS THE RIGHT THING TO DO- and then take a hard honest look at your attitude before you have anything further to do with professional aviation.