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G-CPTN
21st Sep 2006, 14:45
Just announced that Prince William will join Prince Harry in the same Regiment.
REALLY? Imagine Mess-nights! :ugh:

woolyalan
21st Sep 2006, 14:56
I thought brothers/family members couldn't be part of the same regiement for the sake of their families, ie, if the lot get wiped out the mother/father/whoever lose only 1 child rather than 2 etc...

...Or did i just dream that?:confused:

Flip Flop Flyer
21st Sep 2006, 15:37
Wooly

Prolly not much chance of Harry or Willy being sent off to where they might actually get shot at me thinks. Can you imagine it? Willy or Harry on patrol in Helmand or plodding the streets of Basrah? Neither can I ...

woolyalan
21st Sep 2006, 15:40
I dunno, Prince charlie was in and out of combat zones on a chopper wasn't he?

But yea, i can't really imagine it either

G-CPTN
21st Sep 2006, 15:45
Prince Andrew CERTAINLY did his bit in the Falklands!
Throughout the conflict Prince Andrew flew on various missions, including Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) and Anti-Surface Warfare search (ASUW), as well as acting as an Exocet missile decoy; a hitherto secret tactic which the Prince inadvertently revealed to journalists after the war. He also helped in casualty evacuation, transport and Search and Air Rescue (SAR).

Davaar
21st Sep 2006, 15:54
Wooly
Prolly not much chance of Harry or Willy being sent off to where they might actually get shot at me thinks. Can you imagine it? Willy or Harry on patrol in Helmand or plodding the streets of Basrah? ..............Neither can I ...

Revise your powers of imagination.

King George VI served as a gunnery officer, RN, in the battleship HMS Collingwood at the battle of Jutland, survived the sinking of one of HM submarines, and got his wings as a pilot in the RN around 1919. Not a bad record.

His brother HRH the Duke of Kent was killed in 1942 on WW2 active service.

HRH (as he now is but was not, admittedly, then; still he was by birth a foreign prince) The Duke of Edinburgh was of course a serving officer in the RN throughout WW2.

As G-CPTN points out HRH the Prince Andrew flew helicopters at the Falklands.

A brother of Her late Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother was killed in France in WW1.

tony draper
21st Sep 2006, 16:08
Often wondered,why do they call it a Mess?:confused:

FLCH
21st Sep 2006, 16:17
Sure hope he didn't bring his brown shirts with him.

Davaar
21st Sep 2006, 16:29
Often wondered,why do they call it a Mess?:confused:

Latin "missus" course at dinner, via Old French "mes" portion of food. It is a group who gather together to eat, and hence the place.

ormus55
21st Sep 2006, 16:41
could be worse, uncle edward could be there as well.

jammydonut
21st Sep 2006, 16:44
Dont knock it, think of the money we will save on their security minders

woolyalan
21st Sep 2006, 16:48
Actually, thinking about it, haven't all, if not most of the Royals been in the Armed Forces at one point? So, shouldn't the younger, more able bodied Princes' & Princesses be able to defend themselves?

...


...


Thinking about it s'more, forget i said that

slim_slag
21st Sep 2006, 18:05
Well, just heard that they will not be allowed to serve where it's considered too dangerous. Excuse is that it is for the safety of those around them :yuk:

Roll on the Republic

frostbite
21st Sep 2006, 18:09
Roll on the Republic


With President Blair?

tony draper
21st Sep 2006, 18:23
How long did our last President Mr Cromwell last?:rolleyes:

Davaar
21st Sep 2006, 18:26
Even after he was dead and buried!!

Quote Wooly:

Actually, thinking about it, haven't all, if not most of the Royals been in the Armed Forces at one point?

Unquote.

HM the Queen included. She served in the ATS.

HRH the Prince of Wales was in the RN, commanded a coastal minesweeper, holds RN pilot's wings, qualified parachutist, made at least one expedition under the polar ice pack.

G-CPTN
21st Sep 2006, 18:29
If I was in Prince Harry's Regiment, I'd want him in the Front Line.
I certainly wouldn't want the mad little fecker BEHIND me with any form of gun.
Still reckon he's the image of his father . . .
in a recent interview, Col. Hewitt admitted under hypnosis that he'd met Diana in 1981 or 1982 and that their affair began shortly afterward, fuelling widespread conspiracy theories that he may actually be Prince Harry's biological father.

slim_slag
21st Sep 2006, 18:37
With President Blair?I doubt he'd get in :)

Think of the advantages if you had an effective head of state who could veto a Blair.

Of course it could all be a PR ploy. "Hero Princes tell men in dark suits to **** off so they can fight with the lads". They will be stars until they **** up again, might be a week or two.

Davaar
21st Sep 2006, 18:48
If I was in Prince Harry's Regiment, I'd want him in the Front Line.
1. I certainly wouldn't want the mad little fecker BEHIND me with any form of gun.
2 Still reckon he's the image of his father . . .

1. Yes.

2. Come! Come! G-C, banish unworthy thoughts! Honi soit qui mal y pense, for goodness sake, and besides, both the Civil Law and Blackstone on the Laws of England (Vol 1, p 446) tell us that Pater est quem nuptiae demonstrant. In the Roman law the rule applied whether the nuptials occurred before or after the birth. In the English law the nuptials must be before the birth, but even under that less generous rule, all is well. There is No Doubt. Do not give me any fiddle-faddle about DNA. Neither the Romans nor Blackstone had any time for that. Good thing, too.

G-CPTN
24th Sep 2006, 05:18
Just heard that Happy Harry has hurled three smoke-bombs into a marquee at a friend's wedding.
Of course they would be the sort of smoke bombs that you can buy in joke-shops, and NOT anything to do with the military. I mean, THAT would be stealing, wouldn't it?

Willi B
24th Sep 2006, 05:31
Quote:
in a recent interview, Col. Hewitt ...


Did he buy the rank from Gieves?

Low Flier
24th Sep 2006, 05:38
Still reckon he's the image of his father . . .

Prince Andrew is another one who is the spitting image of his natural father.

Rollingthunder
24th Sep 2006, 05:42
I was ambivilent towards Harry until he shot that Dik-Dik with a bow and arrow. Now I don't care a hoot about the shallow little tosser.

Bahn-Jeaux
24th Sep 2006, 10:04
If they were just ordinary Joe Bloggs from Northern England, do any of you really believe that they would have passed Officer Selection with the academic results they have.

Sailor Vee
24th Sep 2006, 10:37
Just because one of them has a degree in 'under-water-basket-weaving, (or the equivalent), doesn't mean he can't be a 'hooray-henry'!:=

419
24th Sep 2006, 10:46
I was ambivilent towards Harry until he shot that Dik-Dik with a bow and arrow
Why wasn't it this Dik-Dik that he shot?
http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/38578000/jpg/_38578369_burrell_pa300.jpg

Davaar
24th Sep 2006, 14:18
do any of you really believe that they would have passed Officer Selection with the academic results they have.

One of "them" did not, whatever the reason, complete officer training.

G-CPTN
24th Sep 2006, 15:19
He possibly got a 'buy' :E

For more than a hundred years, the Landed Gentry have been able to acquire commissions.

Davaar
24th Sep 2006, 16:06
No. He quit. I am not sure that I blame him. I suspect he suffered a lot of hazing and was not well-suited for the job.

Bahn-Jeaux
24th Sep 2006, 17:17
Davaar, I assume you mean Tedward when you mention the quitter.
Point I am making is with the qualifications that the offspring of Charles and Diana have, they would not have made it past the first post had it not been for thier connections.
I can respect someone who has earned thier rank but not someone who has it by virtue of privelege.

G-CPTN
24th Sep 2006, 17:51
In my early twenties I was tasked with taking a young man under my wing. He was adopted. His adoptive father had had a successful career in the Army (at a very senior level - Brigadier). It was assumed that 'son', after 'graduating' from an expensive and highly respected private boarding school (Full British Public School) would join Sandhurst and follow the family tradition in running the military.
He bombed-out on the first day of a (three?) day selection. He wasn't officer material. He wasn't ARMY material. In fact he wasn't even Human Race material.
Father had contacted one of his Retired military comrades to get him a place within the large industrial concern where we were both employed. I even took him into our shared house arrangement (though heaven knows he'd never have made it without pressure from his father's comrade - who, incidentally had two nubile young daughters and lived on a country seat with swimming pool. We were occasionally requested to attend for the entertainment of his daughters (yes, really) when they were home from school - oh and to get his Ferguson tractor started, as we were Engineers.).
Johnny really WAS a disaster. I suppose it's to the Army's credit that they spotted that at an early stage and gave him an immediate discharge.
Johnny (having failed in the Industrial environment) was then punted-on to another ex-military colleague in Australia and assigned to a 'farm' in the outback. An incident in which a Land Cruiser got rolled into destruction brought that to a premature end, and Johnny somehow found himself on an off-shore rig. FFS I wouldn't have gone there, and Johnny was such a disaster he was the LAST person you'd want on a rig!
A while afterwards Johnny returned to the UK from his Emigration adventure. I enquired why he had cancelled his membership of the Land of Opportunity. Johnny replied "Oh, Australia was alright, it was just the Bloody Australians. They think that they OWN the place . . . "
Which is a remarkably concise analysis of a young man who was raised by a dominant father who's catchphrase was "Nonsense, Johnny. Of COURSE you can do it!" without realising that Johnny was lacking a backbone (amongst other essential requirements to survive in life).
Had he been taught to PASS (he could already dribble) then maybe he might have been able to achieve some of the goals that his father (RIP) might have imagined for him. By coincidence, Johnny's parents lived a mere ten miles from my parents, so, whilst Johnny was under my care I socialised over Christmas and New Year with his parents (and his bright, sparky, younger sister, who had been a natural occurrence after the initial disappointment which had prompted the adoption of baby Johnny) so I got to appreciate the scope of the problem. Despite a background of Hunt Balls and 'Coming-out' Balls they'd failed to shift Johnny.

Davaar
24th Sep 2006, 19:03
Davaar, I assume you mean Tedward when you mention the quitter.

I can respect someone who has earned thier rank but not someone who has it by virtue of privelege.

Yes. That's right, and I agree; but perhaps he is the system in reverse. For many, the aspiration to a commission is a noble, etc., ambition; but to him it was an enforced Hell because of his position. He seems not to have been fitted to the job.

I am not one of his admirers, but I believe that Royalty has often had a hard time in the forces: King George VI suffered greatly as s cadet. I believe he was no Titan of te miond either, but he was a most admnirable man.

I thought I was droning on too much so I deleted a part from my previous post.

I have known some wonderfully bright, well-read, and accomplished officers in the RN, the Army, and the RAF, but my post was to the effect that some elite arms of the forces actively do not seek too much brains in their officers.

I quoted a chap I knew, an instructor lieutenant, RN. He had just come back from sitting on a ** officers' selection board. The other two members were a colonel and a lieutenant colonel. They met the candidates.

What do you think? they asked the schoolie. He demurred a bit, being low man on the totem pole, but they pressed him. Well, he allowed, they were great on the OLQ, POC, D & I, and all those good things but .... Ummmm .... not too bright? "Good", said the colonel, "We have never had an intelligent ** officer yet, and we don't want to start now, do we! What? What?". True or not, meant jokingly or not by the senior officers, that is what he told me. I believe it was true, and not joking.

If that is so, they might not have been far wrong. I have known many graduates from PhD down, and to me a degree on its own proves that graduate X (a) had enough money to eat and pay the fees for three to four years, (b) a minor ability to reason and remember data in a given field of endeavour, and (c) a certain degree of tenacity.

Military duty often demands qualities other than (academic) brains, not defined as the absence of such brains, but not guaranteed as a by-product of having such brains.

What we all might look on as dim, Upper, Middle, Or Lower class, if we were looking to fill a top engineering job, might be just right if we want to run across a field shouting abuse at crowd of angry Germans/Russians/Fuzzy-Wuzzies.

tony draper
24th Sep 2006, 21:38
One thought among the Aristocracy the dimmest son was always marked for the Clergy Mr Davaar,the Heir the Spare one for the Army and one for the Church.
:rolleyes:

Bahn-Jeaux
24th Sep 2006, 21:39
What we all might look on as dim, Upper, Middle, Or Lower class, if we were looking to fill a top engineering job, might be just right if we want to run across a field shouting abuse at crowd of angry Germans/Russians/Fuzzy-Wuzzies.

Point taken, not a job for the thinking classes.

Davaar
24th Sep 2006, 22:19
the dimmest son was always marked for the Clergy :

And very well it all worked, too, Dr draper, until (Army) the arrival of the machine gun and (CofE) the Anglican priest, later RC cardinal, John Henry Newman, the Oxford Movement, and the Tractarians.

If you have not savoured Newman's Apologia Pro Vita Sua, run to it, do not walk. I am not unfamiliar with your Doubts and Hesitation to Commit, and I do verily believe it will leave you frothing at the mouth.

Be not intimidated by the title. That is the only Latin in the book. If, once you have read it, you wish to revel in a bath of critical sulphuric acid, turn to "Eminent Victorians" by Lytton Strachey. If you have not already rejoiced in that one, you owe it to yourself. He squirts the vitriol at Newman and, for extra value, others, Florence Nightingale and General Gordon among them.

It exposes as a side benefit the pathetic incompetence of the resident Google scholar/religion critics here, whom one could name but will not, because it would just encourage them. Strachey was on a different plane, not the original, but nevertheless a very great, S*n*f*b*tch.

Hobo
25th Sep 2006, 07:30
I dunno, Prince charlie was in and out of combat zones on a chopper wasn't he?
But yea, i can't really imagine it either
Are you refering to Camilla here? If so it should read :-
"Prince charlie was in and out of combat zones with his chopper wasn't he?"

patdavies
25th Sep 2006, 10:56
Just heard that Happy Harry has hurled three smoke-bombs into a marquee at a friend's wedding.
Of course they would be the sort of smoke bombs that you can buy in joke-shops, and NOT anything to do with the military. I mean, THAT would be stealing, wouldn't it?

I'm sure his grandma wouldn't mind - after all they are her foroces

Needlesplit
25th Sep 2006, 13:14
I thought brothers/family members couldn't be part of the same regiement for the sake of their families, ie, if the lot get wiped out the mother/father/whoever lose only 1 child rather than 2 etc...

Does that mean if they both get slotted we get one of Camilla's kids as monarch??? He he he :rolleyes:

Ace Rimmer
25th Sep 2006, 13:52
Nope get Dof Y then his kids then, Eddie then his kid, then Pranny Annie then her kids (mind you I quite fancy yon Zara).

Still until Wills gets accelerated promotion (a grad entry you see... 2/Lt Nephew Rimmer, grad entrant commissioned in August reckons on being Lt in a year and Capt in two or three after that) Cornet Wales younger will outrank Cornet Wales the elder (earlier date of commission see);)