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colmac747
16th Aug 2006, 16:56
August 15, 2006: On July 31st, a tiny sunspot was born. It popped up from the sun's interior, floated around a bit, and vanished again in a few hours. On the sun this sort of thing happens all the time and, ordinarily, it wouldn't be worth mentioning. But this sunspot was special: It was backward.
"We've been waiting for this," says David Hathaway, a solar physicist at the Marshall Space Flight in Huntsville, Alabama. "A backward sunspot is a sign that the next solar cycle is beginning." link (http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2006/15aug_backwards.htm)
By all accounts it may a BIG (http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2006/10mar_stormwarning.htm) cycle for solar storms:eek:
So to keep it aviation related:D :
In 1958 you couldn't tell that a solar storm was underway by looking at the bars on your cell phone; cell phones didn't exist. Even so, people knew something big was happening when Northern Lights were sighted three times in Mexico. A similar maximum now would be noticed by its effect on cell phones, GPS, weather satellites and many other modern technologies.
Wass that mean to aircraft and such like?:confused: :8

Grainger
16th Aug 2006, 17:03
Been watching 904 for a while - now that's one big spot (size of Neptune :eek:), but it's the "old" way round. This new "backwards" spot is only a little one, but maybe it's a start... One swallow and all that.
By all accounts it may a BIG cycle for solar storms
Woo-hoo ! Roll on those aurorae ! The last solar max gave us some amazing displays in 2002 and 2003.

colmac747
16th Aug 2006, 17:44
On July 31st, a tiny sunspot was born. It popped up from the sun's interior, floated around a bit, and vanished again in a few hours.

Yer don't think it was one of those UFO's, d'ya?:=

madherb
16th Aug 2006, 17:54
No - more likely a thought bubble in Dubya's 'brain'............:8 :8

tilewood
16th Aug 2006, 19:08
Oh No!! Captain Mainwairing we are all DOOMED!! :p

I'm getting a little OD'd on things to worry about.

Frankly my dear too much knowledge is a pain in the arse!! :=

colmac747
16th Aug 2006, 19:10
I'm getting a little OD'd on things to worry about.

I ain't worried:) It's great news for a Ham:ok: :8

HowlingWind
16th Aug 2006, 19:10
Wass that mean to aircraft and such like?Time to dust off the sextant? :confused:

fkelly
16th Aug 2006, 20:48
It might have begun but it ain't began...:ugh:

colmac747
16th Aug 2006, 20:51
Ohhhh.. i was hoping some bugga would come along and correct a very obvious grammatical error.


:mad: (;) )

tony draper
16th Aug 2006, 21:13
I remember ,hmmm must have been the early fifties coming home from school and seeing the sun very low on the horizon,dull red and dull enough to be looked at easily with the naked eye without going blind,it was covered with large dark sun spots easily visible to the eye,remember telling me mates and we all stood looking at it,never ever seen it like that since and have looked at it via a telescope many times over the years,
:confused: :uhoh:

colmac747
16th Aug 2006, 21:19
1958, Drapes?

That year is mentioned in the links above.:cool:

B Fraser
17th Aug 2006, 06:12
It's only a matter of time before some tree hugger who knits their own lentils decides to blame sunspots on global warming :ugh:

Buster Hyman
17th Aug 2006, 08:29
http://web-jpn.org/kidsweb/news/02-09/solar3.jpg

Am I missing something here?:confused:

terryJones
17th Aug 2006, 10:13
If it was backwards, how did they measure its intelligence?...
Colmac 747
I got my licence at the minimum in '64, so had to wait 'ages' for the HF bands to open up.
73's G3UMK

colmac747
17th Aug 2006, 10:49
Got mine in 2004. Condx have been poor ever since:{
Here's hoping:ok:

73s MM0NDX

frostbite
17th Aug 2006, 12:17
pedant mode/ It's '73' = best regards! '73s' = best regardss pedant mode off/ 73 G6TYQ (as from 1984) (Text formatting not working again!)

radeng
17th Aug 2006, 13:09
>It's only a matter of time before some tree hugger who knits their own lentils decides to blame sunspots on global warming<
I'm still not convinced that at least some global warming isn't causation related to sunspots. In late Elizabethan times, oranges could be grown outdoors in southern England: during the 43 year period in the late 16/1700s with no observed sunspots, the weather was extremely cold.
For aviation, the probability is more SIDs causing HF to black out. Magnetic compasses can get errors, and there's a possibility that VOR and the like in northern latitudes could be a bit funny at times. Depends exactly what material is ejected from the sun. Magnetic storms can lead to power blackouts becasue of surges down long overhead power lines - more a US problem than a UK one. I wonder if the sun will be accused of links to Al Quieda?

Capn Notarious
17th Aug 2006, 13:46
Al Quieda?

Nah mate you're thinking of, Al Quieter the home build radio amateur. It were'nt the solar flux that got his propagation. More like solder flux made him QRT : after the screaming stopped.


B licence 20 years ago.

colmac747
5th Sep 2006, 17:47
One is immortal:\

http://cn2r.net/cn2r/cn2log_interface/QSOs/Logbook.asp

Type in MM0NDX and yer'll hear my dulcet tones in the background..Probably the third one down is the best recording...any other hams able to hear what they sound like a few thousand miles away?:cool: :8 :ok:

Loose rivets
6th Sep 2006, 06:24
link (http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2006/15aug_backwards.htm)
By all accounts it may a BIG (http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2006/10mar_stormwarning.htm) cycle for solar storms:eek:
So to keep it aviation related:D :
Wass that mean to aircraft and such like?:confused: :8


"Enter the conveyor belt." You're avvin a larf :*


Did you know, that an average sun-spot is as wide as 10 Earths.

Buster Hyman
6th Sep 2006, 06:44
Did you also know that it's impossible to do a "back of the clock" across the Sun?

green granite
6th Sep 2006, 07:43
Colmac I thought freq below 7030 were reserved for CW?

colmac747
6th Sep 2006, 11:41
*coughs, splutters*

Em, hmmm, GG. During the big contests like the CQWW SSB in October, it's a kind of unwritten rule that SSB contacts take place below 7030, similarly the CW leg of that contest has morse pumping out above 7070:hmm: :E

Loose rivets
8th Sep 2006, 05:58
Would you be kind enough to remind me of the merits and de merits of SSB. I recall learning about them, but can't quite remember how the wave is formed. i.e. is it filtered by some means?

Also, if you have time, the method of modulation. Ta

colmac747
8th Sep 2006, 11:11
I'd end up giving you a long-winded version LR, so here's a link (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carrier_wave) to Wiki.
Sums everything up :ok:

green granite
8th Sep 2006, 11:40
*coughs, splutters*

Em, hmmm, GG. During the big contests like the CQWW SSB in October, it's a kind of unwritten rule that SSB contacts take place below 7030, similarly the CW leg of that contest has morse pumping out above 7070:hmm: :E

I seem to remember a while ago during a contest a polish station started splatering across the slow scan freqs, this naturally pissed off the slow scan boys so they spread right across the 10Khz alocated to them and power went up to max leagal got some brill pickies that day:E

colmac747
8th Sep 2006, 21:27
The National Institute of Amateur Radio (NIAR) has announced that the
Lakshadweep Islands (VU7), the 2nd Most Wanted DXCC Entity(Country), will be activated
in January 2007. Approximately 70 multinational and 30 Indian operators are
expected to travel from Kochin, India, by boat to Lakshadweep on or about 12
January. Plans are to operate as VU7RG (requested call, in memory of the late
Rajiv Gandhi, VU2RG, former Prime Minister of India) on 15-25 January from
three "excellent equipped and well organized sites". Further information will be released exclusively by NIAR
(www.niar.org).

Lakshadweep? :} Anyone ever been on holiday there?!!