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haughtney1
15th Aug 2006, 16:49
Just watching TV..and taking note of the debate about security profiling:hmm:

Yet again the PC brigade (the PC Islam lot this time) have got on the bandwagon complaining that profiling will unfairly target innocent muslims..who do nothing more than look and sound islamic.

Aaaaaaaaaaaaarrggggghh..when will these handwringing apologists learn? Profiling takes into consideration VARIOUS aspects of any one individuals actions, demeanour, personal circumstance, and known behavioural trends based on past known and understood experiences. It is not (as many idiots would have you believe) a simple matter of "he looks like a terrorist..lets stop him":hmm:

Effective and detailed profiling has proved time and time again to be effective..go ask El Al...but then again I bet they wont..El Al is part of the evil zionist empire after all:yuk:

G-CPTN
15th Aug 2006, 16:54
It is not (as many idiots would have you believe) a simple matter of "he looks like a terrorist..lets stop him":hmm:
So positive discrimination will ensure that all those that LOOK like a terrorist (with a bandolier and explosive packs around their waist) will NOT be checked?

tony draper
15th Aug 2006, 16:59
Watched a ding dong betwixt the most senior Islamic policeman in the Met and a American lady on newsnight last night,the man man made a total prat of himself IMHO,she shot him down on every point, the Met do themselves no favours punting him out to speak on their behalf on the media.
:cool:

haughtney1
15th Aug 2006, 17:00
So positive discrimination will ensure that all those that LOOK like a terrorist (with a bandolier and explosive packs around their waist) will NOT be checked?

:p :} ;) absolutely brilliant (you are a dangerous mind Mr CPTN)

Ozzy
15th Aug 2006, 17:10
Profiling should be used to rule out those who are obviously not a potential threat, e.g. grannies, families on holiday, etc etc.

Then the security guys could focus on those nasty terrorist types...:rolleyes:

Ozzy

Monarch Man
15th Aug 2006, 17:18
Profiling is part of a layer of security, it is designed to identify potentially higher risk individuals.
All this nonsense relating to Islamic sensitivities comes out of the realisation by the muslim communities around the UK that a considerable number of their own members are now percieved to be potential threats.

G-CPTN
15th Aug 2006, 17:18
:p :} ;) absolutely brilliant (you are a dangerous mind Mr CPTN)
You might recall the guy dressed as Osama bin Laden who got into a Royal do at Windsor Castle . . . .

http://www.thesun.co.uk/article/0,,2-2003282362,00.html

haughtney1
15th Aug 2006, 17:21
You might recall the guy dressed as Osama bin Laden who got into a Royal do at Windsor Castle . . . .

I dont think he was wearing undies either....:=

AcroChik
15th Aug 2006, 17:42
A few nights ago at dinner, a career military officer who's profession is "security related," said to me, "The moment we start looking for objects and not people at airport gates the system's totally ineffective."

He and another professional in this field spoke about software that can analyze video images for body and eye movements that indicate specific types of stress related to threat, and software that analyzes speech for similar indicators. They also spoke of lessons learned at failed security checkpoints in places like Iraq and also at places like the Capitol building in Washington DC. The discussion became far more technical than I was able to fully grasp.

Despite all the technology talk, though, they were both strongly in favor of highly trained people capable of making rational decisions under pressure being the key ingredient in all security plans.

The upshot was that two people at the table who have made careers out of studying and implementing security proceedures agreed that the current airline security process is ludicrous and is "designed to face the previous threat, not the future one, the one we already know about, not the one we haven't thought of yet."

The military officer in question currently teaches at West Point and the other fellow he was speaking with about this is the director of security for a Fortune 50 company (former military).