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OneWorld22
3rd Aug 2006, 09:38
Anyone watching this Beeb reality show about Scottish fishermen?

I usually hate these shows, but this one is brilliant. My god it's a tough life they have, a real struggle just to get by...

It's funny the way they have to have subtitles with some of the conversations!

Sailor Vee
3rd Aug 2006, 10:06
It's not that strange to have the sub-titles, Doric is the local dialect and even the 'Green Belt' of Glesca and Edinburgh have difficulty understanding!

Tried 3 months on a trawler out of Brixham, weather never as bad as these guys are having to put up with, certainly wouldn't go back to it!!:yuk:

G-CPTN
3rd Aug 2006, 10:16
Must say that I enjoyed watching it the other evening.

Foss
3rd Aug 2006, 10:26
There's fishing villages all along the coast here, bit pointless having any inland I suppose, but all fishermen are headcases, and they all carry very sharp filleting knives ashore. Well the ones I know.

In the next village the headcases that man the lifeboat are fishermen who go out and rescue other fishermen headcases when their boats engine breaks in weather only headcases put to sail in.

Been trawling once, invited along for the ride, and it was flipping awful. Really bad.

Excellent programme.

Fos

Chesty Morgan
3rd Aug 2006, 10:27
Great show:ok:

But isn't it ridiculous when they catch too many fish they have to throw them back in. Even if they're dead. For the preservation of little fishes around the world:ugh:

Bahn-Jeaux
3rd Aug 2006, 10:35
When one was a mere slip of a lad at 13 years old, I spent 3 weeks of my summer hols aboard the Steam trawler (yes, steam folks, built in 1949) Northern Queen out of Grimsby.
Sailed off to Iceland's North cape and dragged around ice floes for Cod and Haddock.
Punishing work in the summer but a nightmare in the winter.
Was the trawler owners intentions to entice school leavers into a life of graft aboard these vessels by giving them a taste of "adventure" early on by allowing family and friends etc, to drag along the gullible youth of the day.
I did eventually go to sea but not until I was in my twenties and spent my fishing years out of Grimsby before ending up on a Spanish trawler sailing out of Vigo.
Very hard graft but comradeship was great, money was great and the lifestyle was brilliant.
The demise of the UK's industry at the hands of the EU meant that earning a living was getting harder and harder so I swallowed the anchor.
Ahh, such memories.

OneWorld22
3rd Aug 2006, 10:40
A great pity the way the industry in the UK and Ireland has been so badly affected because of EU regulations. Our own waters are mo longer our own when it comes to fishing...

Capt.KAOS
3rd Aug 2006, 10:41
Haven't seen this particular show. What I did see was the Discovery Crab Fishing series Deadliest Catch. Awesome... In one episode there was a deckhand being swept overboard and narrowly rescued. He was minutes from death...

Foss
3rd Aug 2006, 10:51
You too can be a trawler man, in the comfort of your own home.

First get very drunk, so you are swaying, then put on your oldest set of oilies.
Then get the lawnmower and start it up in the bathroom so you get bumpa bumpa bumpa bumpa noise continually. Get in the shower and turn it on, cold.
Wash your hair with sardines. Condition with diesel. Try and not be sick with the smell of fish and diesel, the swaying and the constant bumpa, bumpa, bumpa noise. Fillet a bar of soap with a razor sharp knife. Stab yourself in the hand. Rub diesel/sardine paste into the cut. Stand there all night.

Fos

green granite
3rd Aug 2006, 10:54
A great pity the way the industry in the UK and Ireland has been so badly affected because of EU regulations. Our own waters are mo longer our own when it comes to fishing...

It's got less to do with the EU, more to do with the greed of the fishermen themselves, who have quite happily carried on fishing knowing that to do so would exaust the stocks

Bahn-Jeaux
3rd Aug 2006, 11:13
It's got less to do with the EU, more to do with the greed of the fishermen themselves, who have quite happily carried on fishing knowing that to do so would exaust the stocks


Utter CR*P.
Stupid quota regulations and the discards rule (where perfectly good fish is thrown away) coupled with the blatant disregard for the rules by such member states as the French and Spanish are the real reasons.
Widespread fiddling of the figures by the French in particular upon the UK's entry into what was then the EEC resulted in them being given a far larger quota then they should have been entitled to.
Wholesale disregard for size limits and mis-reporting of catches, again by France in particular, these are the real reasons for fishings collapse.

Do you really think that as a fisherman, hauling in 50 boxes of prime haddock among your catch and then having to throw them all back because there is no quota is irresponsible or should you look to the morons in the fisheries departments who have never stepped aboard a boat in their lives. They are the ones who make up the regulations, its the poor fisherman who has to try and make a living in between the mess.

Rant mode on.

Anyone else.....:}

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!
3rd Aug 2006, 11:40
good point, but at the end of the day if there are no fish left, there'll be no living to make whatever regulations are in place.



My god it's a tough life they havebeing Scottish? :E

frostbite
3rd Aug 2006, 11:59
Who needs virtual reality when you have Foss to describe it for you?
Pretty damned accurate too.

I appreciate those sub-titles - some of the dialogue is rather, accent with a trace of language.

lasernigel
3rd Aug 2006, 12:55
Remember going out with a trawler skippers daughter in Fleetwood when I was younger.In those days basic weeks wage on the trawlers was 18 for good deckies.No catch no bonus.Miners at the same time were on 30 and always striking,don't remember the trawlermen ever doing that and know what I'd rather do.
Similar programme on Discovery earlier on in the year about the crab guys going out of Dutch Harbour into the Barents sea in winter.Deserve every penny they get.:ok:

Standard Noise
3rd Aug 2006, 13:11
Fascinating programme, those guys really earn your money. Make you think next time you go down the chippy for a fish supper.
Later on C4's F Word, Janet Street-Toothy went to a cod farm in the Shetlands. It costs a third more than wild cod and those fishermen don't have to risk their lives when they go to work. I'm stumped.
The Deadliest Catch was fascinating as well. Interesting to see how that ex-marine coped first time aboard a crab trawler. I think he wished he was back in the Army.

Foss is only describing his Saturday nights out in Portavogie.
Stikkinout!

allan907
3rd Aug 2006, 13:12
Had one trip on a trawler - well an inshore drifter really - out of Lowestoft. The idiot cadet that I had given responsibility for organising the project weekend from RAF College Cranwell had decided that a spell on a trawler would be a good idea :ugh:

Perfectly calm evening - too bloody calm, big oily swells. We motored out to about 30 miles off the coast and chucked out the long lines. We then sat still awaiting the turn of the tide and after about 5 minutes of this I was providing ground bait for the fishes :yuk: :yuk: :yuk: Eventually, the crew decided to turn around and pull the line in - about 5 miles worth.

I think that they caught about 7 cod and not of a decent size at all. The skipper, dressed in what appeared to be rags, told me that having a stranger on board spelt bad luck. With that news I felt really wonderful having ruined their night. The bloke even gave me one of the fish to "share out amongst the rest of the lads".

I felt very humble.

green granite
3rd Aug 2006, 16:56
Utter CR*P.
Stupid quota regulations and the discards rule (where perfectly good fish is thrown away) coupled with the blatant disregard for the rules by such member states as the French and Spanish are the real reasons.
Widespread fiddling of the figures by the French in particular upon the UK's entry into what was then the EEC resulted in them being given a far larger quota then they should have been entitled to.
Wholesale disregard for size limits and mis-reporting of catches, again by France in particular, these are the real reasons for fishings collapse.

Do you really think that as a fisherman, hauling in 50 boxes of prime haddock among your catch and then having to throw them all back because there is no quota is irresponsible or should you look to the morons in the fisheries departments who have never stepped aboard a boat in their lives. They are the ones who make up the regulations, its the poor fisherman who has to try and make a living in between the mess.

Rant mode on.

Anyone else.....:}

What utter bollocks
Many years ago the people in Iceland realised that cod stocks were dwindling so they introduced a 200mile zone so that the stocks could recover with a much lower level of fishing. What happened? Our trawler men said "we are going to fish there so up yours" and the Royal Navy had warships patrolling the area protecting the trawlers so they could fish the cod to extinction which of course they've more or less managed to do. The EU regs were merely a very belated attempt to stop them fishing the rest of the fish stocks to extinction, which of course they will manage to do.

colmac747
3rd Aug 2006, 17:08
Bugga. I missed this prog:mad:

The trailer looked good.

I blame the wife. Watching some kak like Home's R Us or something equally as boring, presented by a poof in a pink shirt:oh:

As an aside, they ain't comin' near my hallowed island :mad: :mad:

1DC
3rd Aug 2006, 17:44
Green Granite has it about right. Iceland even offered the British trawler owners a reasonable quota but the trawler owners decided they wanted more and that started the cod wars.If the quota had been accepted Grimsby and Hull might even have a trawler fleet today. Or maybe not; as far as i remember one of the giveaways for us joining the common market was our fishing industry.This was to allow the Spanish industry to expand..
When i told my mam i wanted to go to sea for a living i was sent away on a trawler to get the idea out of my head.I was throwing up before we left the river but when i learned how to stand up i enjoyed it and parents then had to backtrack and make sure i went into the Merchant navy instead of fishing. Fishing being too hard a life for her little boy, best thing she ever did keeping me off the trawlers...

Bahn-Jeaux
3rd Aug 2006, 18:50
The Cod Wars were over due to US intervention as Iceland had threatened to close the NATO airbase if the UK didnt back down.
The stocks at that time in the 70's were higher than they are today so who's spouting the bollox now.
I have no problem with Iceland or any nation protecting their stocks, indeed, those who have gone that way still have a sustainable industry.
Witness Norway, who having seen the writing on the EU wall, declined membership of the 'club' and as a result have a plentiful stock left to exploit.
My original beef was the way the EU had destroyed the stocks and thus the living of the UK and Ireland.
It is a documented fact of the quota fiddles and mis-representation of catches by those who had access to stocks which were previously safe from them.
Discarding of over quota fish was always regarded with horror by fisherman and despite protestations was never tackled to alleviate these problems.
This over quota fish was never reported and so was never included in catch statistics.
Years of lobbying for a no discards rule which would have given a true indication of the state of stocks were brushed aside because we were never in control of our own waters.
That is the real problem of the home industry.
I have lived it and worked it, my father and grandfather both being skippers and both dying at sea.
My uncles were all skippers and my brothers both have skippers tickets.
Unfortunately there is nothing for them to catch viably.
Nothing to do with greed, everything to do with politics.

colmac747
3rd Aug 2006, 19:31
Big thanks to the member dontpickit who PM'd me to say the prog is on all week.

Brainless here, thought it was on only the once!:ugh:

The torpedo find was a class moment..:D

markflyer6580
3rd Aug 2006, 21:17
That torpedo was great! "I'm gonna point it over there in case it goes off,but I might point it at the wheelhouse instead!":}

I have enjoyed watching this program and the lads seem to earn some good money,but looking at some of the swells they were going through they deserve it,I would have spent the entire trip praying to the porcelain:yuk:

Discarding of over quota fish was always regarded with horror by fisherman

Rightly so,that rule is utter bollox. Fair enough if it went to waste but it would sell on shore anyhow.
I had to admire the skipper who instead of throwing them back went out to try and get more prawns to even it out,although it meant going 100 miles back in the other direction.:ok:

mini
3rd Aug 2006, 21:49
Fos... Brilliant, take a bow!

mini spent a week on a trawler once... I'd rather shoot kids for a living...

:sad:

Cheerio
3rd Aug 2006, 22:16
Pelagic fishing was the Cheerio family business until the late 60's when my Grandad sold up and retired. When times were hard in my own sector in the mid 80's one of my cousins offered me a job on the trawlers. I don't think I was up to it!
It started in the 1600's when three brothers arrived in St Combs from Norway. Now their issue fill several pages of the NE Scotland phone book....

TURIN
3rd Aug 2006, 23:11
:confused: Question.

Do UK vessels fish in Spanish and French waters?

If so do they moan about us the same way?

Foss
4th Aug 2006, 10:42
Standard
Thank you so very much, I'm too posh to drink in Portavogie. Well really too scared.

Saddest sight was watching fishermen beaching their boats on the sands and then setting light to them because they couldn't cope financially with the restrictions.

There's a lobster fisherman I watch every morning at 0700ish, picking up pots about 100m offshore from notorious rocky points of death in a treacherous tide. It's an hours sailing to get where he is from where he's berthed, probably takes 30 mins to get under way, 30 mins to get out of the house. So he's up early.
Then he spends more time time hauling pots out of freezing water, once he's seen the marker buoys, caught them with a boat hook , and put a thing with large claws into a bucket, who is not happy.

Met the guy, he's about seventy.

I prefer watching GMTV at that time of the morning.

Fos

colmac747
4th Aug 2006, 16:55
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/5244738.stm?ls

He suggested Cockney soap EastEnders also carry subtitles so the BBC was "consistent" on regional dialects.

Pah...discuss that one BBC fans:p

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/4566028.stm :E

G-CPTN
4th Aug 2006, 17:09
Scandyhooligan TV never needed subtitles, and they'd have Danes (from various regions - Schleswig, Jutland, Funen and Seeland), Swedes (also various regional dialects from Skane, Gothenburg, Stockholm or the frozen north), and Norwegians (and THAT'S a big country too) all talking their own language. No different to Glaswegian, Cockney and West-Country OOAH.

Loose rivets
4th Aug 2006, 17:15
I used to carry me judo suit to ABZ, thought that I would give a good account of meself...hah! The lads were mostly off the fishing boats and they spent endless hours on slippery heaving decks. They were damned nigh impossible to get off balance. I got trounced.

One hot evening, we were in the old building used as the dojo, and the atmosphere, to put it politely, was fishy. Very moist, very hot and very fishy. Just to add to the atmosphere [in the other sense] there was a bagpipe class in the next room.

Being thumped on the mat time and again, in time to off-key bagpipes, was a little.....surreal.

airship
4th Aug 2006, 17:20
I don't know about trawlermen though I have the utmost respect for seafarers generally, but the very idea of the trawl is an obscene way of catching fish IMHO. Imagine a net, a huge one when these boats are doing it in pairs, weighed down by heavy rollers and chains, being dragged along the seabed, literally destroying everything in its' path. Can you imagine doing the same thing on land, in the hope of catching uhmmm, maybe wild chickens, pheasants or rabbits?! :confused: :mad:

If mankind truly believes there's still room left for industrial-type "hunting and gatherering" in the 21st century, which is basically what commercial fishing is all about, then I'd say that we're going to be sailing in some very rough waters in the very near future... :sad:

frostbite
4th Aug 2006, 20:24
Have to agree with you there, airship!

And, if that wasn't bad enough, there is a very similar 'technique' being used over huge areas in the harvesting of gravel.

MyData
4th Aug 2006, 21:12
Great programme and utmost respect to these guys.

One question for those in the know. Who is the skipper when the skipper is getting 40 winks? The crew is so small it appears that the skipper never sleeps.

Sailor Vee
4th Aug 2006, 21:24
The 1st Mate takes over after shooting the nets, and the skipper will normally be called just before the haul, he'll probably do this three times a day, getting 3 sessions of about 2 & 1/2 hours off, not all spent sleeping either!

Kestrel_909
4th Aug 2006, 21:36
I prefer watching GMTV at that time of the morning.


I'm not sure which is worse!!

I am friends with one of the nutcases, fishes out of Ardglass. I have the utmost respect for them all. I have spent many days in the sea on the north coast here for a couple of hours at a time and sitting back down at home with something warmer than 20degrees in your hand is utter relief. I have no idea how they stick it for so many hours a day, 10 days at a time.

Saltwater stinging your eyes, wearing so much gear you feel like a space man, wind in your face, being soaked over and over again, waves crashing over the deck, seagulls sh*tting on you, permanent smell of fish, knowing every step could be your last.

****, jumping 10ft waves on a jetski at Benone makes me scream like a little girl, a rough crossing on the ferry from Liverpool on a bad night is enough for me! I honestly think if I saw an 18m wave coming towards me, that I wouldn't be alive by the time it reached me!

Great programme, I missed most of the Deadliest Catch series :(

con-pilot
4th Aug 2006, 22:12
Do what you can to watch the "Deadliest Catch" series. In one episode one of the ships it hit by a rouge wave, rolls 90% and loses all power. In another episode a ship is lost with all on board but one hand.

These guys are tough as nails, but you could see the fear in their faces. After watching that series I never waste any crab.

airship
4th Aug 2006, 22:18
...I never waste any crab. Penicillin might help...?! ;)

G-CPTN
4th Aug 2006, 22:23
I'd never waste ANY crab! I LOVE crab.

con-pilot
4th Aug 2006, 22:28
Penicillin might help...?!

No fair Airship. Have you been in the Scotch already? I'm just now having my first.

(According to my medical friends penicillin don't do a thing to crabs. So you better change your treatment.:p )

Sailor Vee
4th Aug 2006, 22:34
You're right there, con-pilot, Crabs (pubic lice), are susceptible to a paste, which early on, was a delicate shade of blue and nick-named Crab-Fat, it almost matched the RAF uniforms and hence why that force is called the 'Crabs'.

airship
4th Aug 2006, 22:44
Have you been in the Scotch already? I'm just now having my first. Well, 5pm was a long time ago here in France... :ok: Actually, I don't believe I've ever caught a venereal disease. I once had a sore throat after a few hectic days in Curacao back in the '80s, and the skipper gave me some penicillin and it "went away" after a couple of days (which is prolly why I suggested the penicillin)... :} I didn't go blind but I was almost completely deaf by the time I saw a doc in NZ - he said my ears were totally gummed up from only ever taking showers for months on end. Do you know how embarassing it can be to have an extremely pretty nurse syringe out the wax in yer ears...?! :{

con-pilot
4th Aug 2006, 22:48
I was just kidding old buddy, knock on wood neither have I.

Do try and find the "Deadliest Catch" series, it will be worth the effort.

Er, not tonight though.:p

SXB
4th Aug 2006, 22:49
1DC
as far as i remember one of the giveaways for us joining the common market was our fishing industry.This was to allow the Spanish industry to expand..


Your memory is a little hazy. The UK joined the EC in 1973, Spain didn't join until 1986, therefore there wasn't much of a Spanish lobby in Brussels when Britain joined. You can't always blame everything on the European Community, or Common Market, EU etc.....

Bahn-Jeaux
5th Aug 2006, 06:47
He is partially correct. the great giveaway was our fishing but to the French in the main.
Heath was well aware of this and instructed ministers to lie should any questions ever become too awkward to answer.
There have been numerous programs, books etc documenting his treachery.

The Spanish circumvented the rules by buying UK ships and filling them with Spanish crews with a token UK presence and then plundered the UKs stocks and quotas for its own benefit, fiddling catch logs and ignoring size rules on the way.
None of this is now needed as they are full EU partners ( I use that term very loosely)

I could go on forever but whats the point.
We were screwed, full stop.:mad:

Loose rivets
5th Aug 2006, 06:55
Pelagic fishing was the Cheerio family business until the late 60's when my Grandad sold up and retired. When times were hard in my own sector in the mid 80's one of my cousins offered me a job on the trawlers. I don't think I was up to it!
It started in the 1600's when three brothers arrived in St Combs from Norway. Now their issue fill several pages of the NE Scotland phone book....

Well, that could be confusing.

Hello Cheerio

What? you just said hello!

Yes, Cheerio?

Yes I am Cheerio

Oh well, if you don't want to talk...Cheerio. :} :} :}

Foss
5th Aug 2006, 12:50
I did go sport fishing once. off the US somewhere, where they filmed jaws, great.
Two crew, one of whom immediately bunked down on the deck in a sleeping bag. Shurley shome mistake I thought, and went to a bunk. The boat lurched violently and I fell out, over the wooden guard and fell about four feet. That hurt.
Hours and hours of motoring, then get a slap on the head and someone shouting 'STRIKE'.
rut roh.
Half asleep someone kindly strapped me into a chair. After about forty minutes reeled in a 110lb tuna.
I was knackered, the tuna was dead, and had sprayed blood all over me.
It was 6.30am.
Now that box is ticked, I don't think I'll do that again.
Fos

Ozzy
5th Aug 2006, 15:38
The Deadliest Catch about the Alaskan King Crab hunters? Effing great series, I watch it regularly. Brilliant (and at times sad) stuff.

Ozzy