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Rollingthunder
1st Aug 2006, 03:53
Got to be eggs. Quick, light and delicious. Used in most cultures. Sorry to all those vegans who don't eat them.

So many ways they can be cooked.

So many recipies that incorporate them.

AntiCrash
1st Aug 2006, 04:14
I thought it was proven to be beer.

G-CPTN
1st Aug 2006, 04:28
Cheese is handy to have in the fridge (and the freezer - well, 'hard' cheese anyway). I always try to keep a selection of cheeses. Cheese and pickle, cheese-on-toast, cheese omlette (two kinds, one made with scrambled egg, the other with whipped-whites and folded-in whisked-yolks then pan-fried followed by grilling).

reynoldsno1
1st Aug 2006, 05:13
Rice - kao in Thai which is also the word for food .....

kenfoggo
1st Aug 2006, 05:17
The well stocked larder should always contain,


wolf nipple chips
larks tongues in aspic
otters noses
gannet on a stick

G-CPTN
1st Aug 2006, 05:21
Rice - kao in Thai which is also the word for food .....
I know this isn't food (well I suppose it is) but in Denmark, the word for a (wild) animal is the same as the word for a deer. Probably didn't have free-range elephants.

bar fly
1st Aug 2006, 10:25
Rollingthunder - see http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/5226338.stm (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/5226338.stm) for extra help with enjoying your favourite grub!

Flip Flop Flyer
1st Aug 2006, 10:31
G-CPTN

I know this isn't food (well I suppose it is) but in Denmark, the word for a (wild) animal is the same as the word for a deer. Probably didn't have free-range elephants.

It must certainly ain't, sir! "Vildt" is the common name for everything that's living in the wild, after you've shot and cooked the critters that is. Could be a deer, could be a rabbit or a duck. The name for a deer, however, is "hjort" or "kronhjort" if it's a really big male one. You are, however, correct that free-range elephants are very rare indeed. But as a traveller of Denmark, I'm confident you've heard of Knuthenborg where they do indeed have free-range rhinos. Well, sort of free-range, but it's a mighty big enclosure they've got to roam about in.

The perfect food is any delicious dish which has been prepared with love, and served free of charge :ok:

Barkly1992
1st Aug 2006, 10:46
Eggs (free range of course); bacon; potatoes; oinions; cheese.

Turned into a Spanish Omelete on a Friday evening washed down with a good Oz Cab/Sav.

:p

Solid Rust Twotter
1st Aug 2006, 10:55
Biltong and beer.

All the food groups contained in a glass of ale and a chunk of biltong while watching the rugby....:ok:

green granite
1st Aug 2006, 11:07
Bacon butty

TURIN
1st Aug 2006, 11:26
The well stocked larder should always contain,
wolf nipple chips
larks tongues in aspic
otters noses
gannet on a stick

You forgot the Otter's Noses.:ok:

Have to go along with the bacon butty. Preferably with a fried egg or two thrown in.;) ;)

madherb
1st Aug 2006, 11:41
Aligot! With a suitably juicy sausage hot off the coals.............and, on a hot day, a Tafel lager or two..........:E :E
One remembers a distant past (long long ago thank heavens) when a pilot's breakfast consisted of:
a chunky chuckle; :yuk:
a Rennies;
a cigarette (for those who did - usually a Camel)
(nips off for a sip of icy Dom)
:E :ok:
M

Jerricho
1st Aug 2006, 14:58
I thought it was proven to be beer.

Hell yeah. It's liquid bread.

Foss
1st Aug 2006, 15:09
Potato bread, fried egg, bacon and brown sauce.
Or Pizza. Or a PJ sandwhich.
I'm hungry now.
Fos

Standard Noise
1st Aug 2006, 15:24
Potato bread
Foss - you evil bugger, I'm having trouble with supply at the minute and I'd just about taught myself to forget the silky smooth, velvety texture of a good potato farl. And now you've ruined all my good work.
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRGGGGHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!

Good bacon (ie direct from the farm, not Tesco/Sainsbury/Asda etc) and free range eggs, preferably organic.

lexxity
1st Aug 2006, 15:30
Look what you've done now, I've the bacon and egg buttie lust upon one now. The perfect buttie is made with smoked bacon of about 3cm thickness, three rashers there off and two fresh free range eggs, fry the eggs until the yolks are golden and runny. Pop both between two slices of white bread which has been spread liberally with butter and tomato sauce and a bit of pepper. Push down so the yolks explode into the bread. Delicious!:ok:

Standard Noise
1st Aug 2006, 15:45
Tomato sauce!!! Oh ya dirty beast.
Repeat after me, "I must learn to love the HP, I will learn to love the HP. TOMATO SAUCE IS THE SPAWN OF THE DEVIL, HP is the path to salvation."
10 times every morning prior to scoffing the aforementioned butty.

lexxity
1st Aug 2006, 15:46
Nope not going to happen, I sold my soul to Heinz already.:E

TopBunk
1st Aug 2006, 18:17
....is made with smoked bacon of about 3cm thickness, three rashers there off ....

Blimey, now that is some thick bacon slice - more like a pork chop:) :)

G-ZUZZ
1st Aug 2006, 19:00
Eggs (free range of course) I only eat battery-hen eggs. I think it's unfair that they suffer for nothing because people go and eat the free-range ones so I help out the only way I can.

Felix Saddler
1st Aug 2006, 19:16
Anything that tastes nice and is good for you! :ok:

AcroChik
1st Aug 2006, 19:20
Bread you've baked yourself.

TokZik
1st Aug 2006, 19:45
I gotta say do like a good steak bacon and egg bagette umm....
Ive been between Spain and England the last 13 years and i think my meals have been getting a little wierd.
But try it its good stuff

flyblue
1st Aug 2006, 21:15
Macadamia. I blame Wholi for introducing me to it :*

lexxity
1st Aug 2006, 21:19
To truly appreciate good smoked bacon it needs to be thick. (bit like me really.:} ) I think I mean about 1cm to 2cm if at all possible although normal rashers will suffice, not the piddly ones I bought the other day, they were so thin you could actually see through them!:eek:

green granite
1st Aug 2006, 21:42
To truly appreciate good smoked bacon it needs to be thick. (bit like me really.:} ) I think I mean about 1cm to 2cm if at all possible although normal rashers will suffice, not the piddly ones I bought the other day, they were so thin you could actually see through them!:eek:

and wringing wet no doubt :yuk:

lexxity
1st Aug 2006, 21:53
Actually they were dry, but the thinness meant they fell apart, they were purchased from the farmers market too!:eek: I only bought them because they had been cunningly packed to look thick!!!!:mad:

tony draper
1st Aug 2006, 21:58
One begs to differ,the only way to fry bacon nice and crisp but not burned is to have it sliced wafer thing,especialy modern bacon with all that horrible gung in it.
The potato is a good ideal food package,although it did lead to the famine in Irerland,with its introduction land that at one time could only support one,could suddenly support twenty or thirty, resulting in a population explosion,when the blight came as it will with a mono cultures it lead to disaster.
:(

B Fraser
1st Aug 2006, 22:07
Sushi or sashimi or thin sliced Parma ham or prosciutto or ripe cheese or just about anything.

remember....beer is more than just a breakfast drink.

G-ZUZZ
1st Aug 2006, 22:07
The potato is a good ideal food package,although it did lead to the famine in Irerland,with its introduction land that at one time could only support one,could suddenly support twenty or thirtyI thought you could grow more than 20 or 30 potatoes on a decent-sized piece of land.



The pizza is the ideal food:

It contains all the major food groups, including vegetables.

It is abundant and easily sourced.

It is round which means all slices are equal and also you can roll it home.

It comes in a grease-soaked cardboard box which will burn well when you throw it into the fireplace.


As an American I'm proud to say we invented the best food in the world. Pizza.

tony draper
1st Aug 2006, 22:12
Over forty years since I tasted Pizza for the first and last time,didn't like it,tiz only glorified welsh rarebit int it?
:rolleyes:

Chesty Morgan
1st Aug 2006, 22:25
SPAM SPAM SPAM SPAM SPAM SPAM.

Sliced, fried, chucked in between two slices of thick crusty bread covered in ketchup and butter.

And bo11ocks to cholesterol!

B Fraser
1st Aug 2006, 22:43
As an American I'm proud to say we invented the best food in the world. Pizza.

and were first to fly the Atlantic non-stop too I suppose :rolleyes:

AcroChik
1st Aug 2006, 22:45
That's sad, tony, as truly good pizza is one of the foods of the gods, and one of its various heavens (which include New Haven and Chicago), is my home town.

Even better though, home made pizza, crust and all, paper thin, baked in your oven on a thick slab of terra cotta. Divine. And the gorgeous result includes what I've said is the perfect food: bread you've baked yourself. Here in NYC you can get real buffalo mozzarlla, flown in fresh daily ~ nothing else compares.

con-pilot
1st Aug 2006, 23:42
and were first to fly the Atlantic non-stop too I suppose

Er no, that would have been the British, we were the first to fly around the world. However, I don't believe the crews for either trip had pizza. Maybe peanut butter and jam sandwiches?:p

Nature's perfect food is honey, it can never spoil, closely followed by Scotch.:E

However, my great-grandmother, who was a native American, told me this about food.

Never eat anything white.

Never eat anything that can't spoil (except honey), and eat it before it does spoil.

Never the less, her pan fried chicken was heavenly, cream gravy and mashed potatoes with fresh corn on the cob was the best food on earth. (The chickens that were sacrificed for dinner were running around the back yard that morning, that might have had something to do how great it tasted.)

(I asked her about the mashed potatoes being white and she hit me with a spoon and told me not to talk back to her.)

Another trivia note about food. In the year 1900 the most expensive meal one could order in any New York City restaurant was, fried chicken (well to be honest any chicken dish), the cheapest was oysters and lobsters.

AcroChik
2nd Aug 2006, 00:03
Never eat anything white.
Never eat anything that can't spoil (except honey)...

So much for vanilla ice cream, then :p

Very interesting and true about honey. I recall reading a placard in the Metropolitan Museum of Art Egyptian exhibit that said the urn it was describing was found full of stored honey that was still perfectly edible. Thanks for reminding me of that.

I think the name of that famous NYC restaurant where Carnegie, Morgan, Frick, et al dined on lobsters and oysters was Delmonico's.

con-pilot
2nd Aug 2006, 00:06
So much for vanilla ice cream, then

That why I stick strictly to chocolate ice cream!:p

uffington sb
2nd Aug 2006, 12:54
Lexxity
To truly appreciate good smoked bacon it needs to be thick. (bit like me really. ) I think I mean about 1cm to 2cm if at all possible although normal rashers will suffice, not the piddly ones I bought the other day, they were so thin you could actually see through them!
I thought you youngen's were au-fait with the metric system. Three rashers 1 to 2 cms thick is 1.18" to 2.36" thick, plus egg and bread.
Thats one hell of a lot of pork to swallow!!! ;)

G-CPTN
2nd Aug 2006, 13:30
Thats one hell of a lot of pork to swallow!!! ;)
:confused:

Foss
2nd Aug 2006, 14:20
There aren't actually any potatoes in potato bread. Its just flour, egg and fat, fried in fat.
Vegetable roll is another brekkie favourite. It's all meat. My beloved father has a great recipe for cooking slices with the the plastic wrapper still on 'well how the hell are you meant to see that?'
You could smell burning plastic in the driveway, and hear the smoke alarm. :ugh:

Sorry Standard, my aim is too please.

Fos

Standard Noise
2nd Aug 2006, 15:54
There aren't actually any potatoes in potato bread. Its just flour, egg and fat, fried in fat.

I see where you're going wrong Fos, don't buy it from Tesco! Make it yerself.

And why can't you get 'Breakfast Slices' over here. C'mon Denny, start a new export market.

Lon More
2nd Aug 2006, 16:17
Potato bread (http://www.irelandseye.com/aarticles/culture/recipes/baking/potbread.shtm) recipe
with bacon, sausage and fried egg. :mad: the diet!!:O

Foss
2nd Aug 2006, 17:55
DOH!
Awfully sorry, I've just asked my mum on the phone, there are potatoes in potato bread. Mashed apparently, then mixed with flour to make a DOH!. I've only ever seen them at the dough stage.
:rolleyes:
Ah well, ye learn something everyday.

Lon More
You're quite right.

Fos :O
But there's no Coke in Soda farls, definately.

G-CPTN
2nd Aug 2006, 18:09
There aren't actually any potatoes in potato bread.
You were obviously using the recipe developed in Ireland during the potato famine. Similar adjustments had to be made in England during the War. (One suspects that the Welsh and the Scots were sufficiently well-supplied from the 'black market' rife in rural areas. Apart from bananas, that is. Don't think they mastered banana culture, leastwise if they did they kept it quiet.)

Foss
2nd Aug 2006, 18:19
Did read that German spies in Belfast reported that after the blitz here things were sooo bad the locals were making bread out of potatoes. Stupid sausage eaters.

Dead granny's favourite food: Soft boil one egg, put it in a mug add a very large amount of butter, season and stir. Eat. Vomit. :yuk:

Fos

TopBunk
2nd Aug 2006, 20:12
Smoked bacon ... phah .... in the colonies my sister can only get smoked bacon .... it's the pits. The only bacon worth eating is unsmoked back bacon and BRITISH, none of your foreign rubbish.

And as for brown sauce ..... :yuk:

AcroChik
2nd Aug 2006, 20:21
TopBunk...

That's the truth!

Most bacon, and all supermarket bacon in the States is rubbish, injected with water, loaded with nitrites to make it that pale pink color. The "smoke" flavor they claim to give it is chemically induced (think exogenous testosterone, for those of you who followed the Landis thread).

In larger cities, you can get good bacon, often imported from Germany, Ireland or the UK, either in slices or in slabs, but it costs.

The best bacon I've had here is by small local producers who do things like smoke it over real applewood, or dry-cure it. This stuff's really expensive and really a treat. It makes the classic bacon-lettuce-tomatoe-on-toast something special.

lexxity
2nd Aug 2006, 20:44
Oak smoked thick rashers are marvellous.:ok:

con-pilot
2nd Aug 2006, 20:51
The best bacon I've had here is by small local producers who do things like smoke it over real applewood, or dry-cure it.

One of the few perks of living in a agricultural state is that we can get fresh bacon straight from the farms. We just got a whole pig with about 25 pounds of bacon. The difference in taste from major brand supermarket bacon is beyond belief. The butcher smoked and cured the hams and bacon.

There's almost not enough room left in the freezer for my chocolate ice cream.:p

tinpis
20th Aug 2006, 02:07
On the subject of food..
Sorry if Aristos has been inflicted upon you just to let you know we notice....:rolleyes:

Hot woks aside, it's cooking sans zing

November 2 2002

Who the hell is Aristos? Just about the most annoying man on Australian television, that's who. Sure, he could co-host Can I Send You Bonkers? with Eddie Everywhere and Steve watch-me-pull-a-cobra-out-of-this-croc Irwin, but Aristos stands alone for crimes against food.

Surprise Chef was bad enough, but now he's back with a bigger budget and plane tickets and more awful recipes than you can shake a highly promoted bottle of Spanish olive oil at.

BYO Kitchen (Seven, Sunday) sucks. Bernard King, come back. All is forgiven. Where's Graham Kerr? What about Margaret Fulton? If Aristos deserves another food show, than the guy who dreamt up Chicken Tonight should be anchoring the news.

I'm not down on the local practical telly chefs. Why, only this week Jason Roberts (Fresh, Nine, Mon-Fri) whipped up some pumpkin pancakes with a citrus yoghurt dressing that looked, well, fresh. Every week he re-jigs common or garden ingredients that can readily be found in the fridge, or at the shops, and offers easy kitchen inspiration.

Iain Hewitson spends more than half of every show wiping drips of oil and sauce off every serving plate. The man could make stock from that tea towel, but he's sincere and pleasant enough. Maeve O'Meara's recipes provide a gentle nudge to mothers who are big on chops and short on imagination. But personally I prefer O'Meara in the excellent Food Lover's Guide to Australia (SBS).

If Aristos lies at the bottom of the foodie food chain, then the man at the top, with daylight between himself and the nearest competition, is Neil Perry in Food Source (Foxtel, Lifestyle). This time out Perry has taken the ponytail, the Rockpool cred, and a very talented small crew on the road around Asia. We're in the big hotels, the street markets, the cooking schools and Perry's kitchen. While some pork is sizzling in a wok, Perry takes us to a cooking school in Chiang Mai. Snazzy editing may be borrowed from Nigella Lawson, but unlike the Cream Pig with her lustrous locks dragging in litres of boiling butter, the food gets most of the attention here.

Every frame is mouthwatering. The food, the countryside, the food, the locals, the kitchens and the food look gorgeous. You could watch this thing on a full stomach and still develop an appetite.

Perry is still flogging plenty of wines, hotels and destinations, and his pitch is all but drowned out by the frothing fury of a hot bubbling wok. It's sexy, but it ain't simple.

Spare ribs cooked for an hour in a giant vat of master stock, dried, macheted, deep-fried and drowned in a sticky sauce of caramelised sugar, black vinegar and soy - and that's one of the simple recipes. Inspirational, certainly. After watching the first two episodes I was inspired to book a table at Rockpool and a plane ticket to Bangkok.

By contrast, Jamie Oliver's attempt at a Thai curry is piss poor and has about as much authenticity as Auntie June's curried egg sandwiches. In his new series, Oliver's Twist (Wednesday, ABC), Oliver appears to have slightly lost his way. That said, every episode delivers useful tips and simple but fresh everyday recipes. He'll bring together a can of beans and some grilled squid. He'll toss that warm salad with enough ease and confidence to dispel the fear of limp rocket for good. His desserts do actually take 10 minutes to prepare, and don't look like dog food when served, and all his stunned mullet friends really enjoy the free feed.

But in this series the production values are just a little off. Oliver has moved house, or borrowed a really garish set from The Hoobs. The spiral staircase and the producer with whom he shares his insights are gone. Now friends slump like sacks of potatoes on stools while Oliver chops and blabs. Have they had a warm salad before? A rhubarb cobbler? A puntanesca pasta? A sandwich? A cup of cold sick with a sprig of coriander? These people may be friends but they live on kebabs and beer. Some of them are ABBA impersonators, for God's sake. They don't deserve to eat.

The most enthusiastically received Thai food on television can be found on Survivor (Nine, Thursday). A pineapple full of rice and prawns may not be authentic but to the starving fools who earned this reward by being thinner, browner, toothier and stupider than the other team, it was a feast. While the losers were eating raw clams and fingernails, the winners chowed down on a Thai meal that looked like it had made a small detour through the kitchen of Sizzler. Hilarious.

This fifth series offers nothing new and nobody to like, but the game is still a good one. Skateboarding barmen have spiritual awakenings while old ladies in Speedos hold funerals for dead baby bats. I just hope that the next team to lose immunity eats a meal prepared by Aristos.

This story was found at: http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2002/11/01/1036027034193.html



Wish I had writ that :(

madherb
20th Aug 2006, 07:01
Don't want to hijack this thread, but need some help - a commercially-produced low GI brown seed loaf I used to buy contains the preservatives Calcium Propionate and Sodium Diacetate. Sounds like a bad day in Chemistry 101. Every other pre-sliced loaf I have seen contains variations of these and other preservatives. Have resorted to baking my own bread as a result.

Has anyone suffered allergic reactions to preservatives in food? I am at my wit's end over a post-nasal drip, which I have had since April, and cannot cure. Thought maybe preservatives could be the culprit? Any advice welcome!

PS wish I could find some of that fresh bacon you are all raving about - never seen it here. Just the supermarket type........:yuk::yuk:

patdavies
20th Aug 2006, 09:31
One of the few perks of living in a agricultural state is that we can get fresh bacon straight from the farms.

Surely if bacon is fresh, it is still pork?

RAC/OPS
20th Aug 2006, 11:07
Lexxity
To truly appreciate good smoked bacon it needs to be thick. (bit like me really. ) I think I mean about 1cm to 2cm if at all possible although normal rashers will suffice, not the piddly ones I bought the other day, they were so thin you could actually see through them!
I thought you youngen's were au-fait with the metric system. Three rashers 1 to 2 cms thick is 1.18" to 2.36" thick, plus egg and bread.
Thats one hell of a lot of pork to swallow!!! ;)

I thought that 2.5 cm was about 1 inch so surely 1 - 2 cm thick is between just under half an inch to a squidgen over 3/4 (or 4/5)....?

Howard Hughes
20th Aug 2006, 11:22
Bread you've baked yourself.
I think Acro Chick has it 100% right, without fresh bread there wouldn't be any bacon butties youv'e all been raving about...:ok:

Fresh bread is also the greatest smell ever!:D

I'll fight you for the end acro chick...;)