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lastofthesummerwine
30th Jul 2006, 21:43
Ok, a set in his ways, old [email protected] and not sure about this contraption!:confused:

Will it be see on the tarmac at Bristol or Leeds Bradford, for example, taking passengers on their holidays?

What exemptions will it hold for Commercial flight, as pilots, I understand ,can hold only one type rating at a time in fixed wing aircraft, but numerous in the rotorcraft world!

V22 (http://www.boeing.com/rotorcraft/military/v22/index.htm)

AcroChik
30th Jul 2006, 21:46
This airframe has a much-discussed, controversial flight test history. You'll have no trouble finding extensive, credible information on this topic with a brief on-line search.

G-CPTN
30th Jul 2006, 21:52
Personally, I preferred the Fairey Rotodyne concept.
I was 'lucky' to see (and hear!) the prototype performing.
http://www.jefflewis.net/graphics/aircraft/Fairey_Rotodyne_2.jpg

AcroChik
30th Jul 2006, 21:58
That almost looks like a product of the Soviet-era Anatov Design Bureau. Now there were a bunch of folks who knew how to make an airplane look truly odd.

HowlingWind
30th Jul 2006, 23:11
If I may be somewhat less diplomatic than AcroChik, I would say the Fairey Rotodyne was ooking fugley!

Not that that had anything to do with why you don't see them whizzing around these days, but, umm, think about it...

Back to the topic...yes, the V-22 has had some well-publicised problems. But it's my understanding she went on her own power to Farnborough this year, worked well, and was well received.

Hopefully all the issues with its advanced engineering have been sorted, or will be. The US Marines have ordered a lot of them, if I'm not mistaken, and they are expecting to go operational in a year or two (?, again, IIRC).

If they can make it work in the military, no doubt it will some day go commercial, though that might be a good 5-10 years out. Plenty of applications for it, if it can be proven reliable and safe. :ok:

Mostly Harmless
31st Jul 2006, 00:11
What exemptions will it hold for Commercial flight, as pilots, I understand ,can hold only one type rating at a time in fixed wing aircraft

I hold several current type ratings on fixed wing right now.

If I am not mistaken, the civilian version is the Bell 609.

AcroChik
31st Jul 2006, 00:32
I wasn't going to touch that part of the post, but since MH did...

Several fixed-wing type ratings cover more than one airframe. I believe this is true in a number of Citations and Gulfstreams and probably others I can't think of at the moment.

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!
31st Jul 2006, 00:42
there's just been a thread on MIL...erm maybe it was AH&N about the two a/c

AcroChik
31st Jul 2006, 02:30
From the excellent web site Global Security Org, this on the Osprey:

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/aircraft/v-22.htm

Includes about a dozen clickable sidebars on the various Air Force, Navy, Marines variants, performance envelope, propulsion, mission profiles, costs, maintainability (and on and on quite nearly infinitum).

The brief essay on asymmetric Vortex Ring States is nicely done, and in a low-key way points to some basic issues in this airframe's history:

"In the tiltrotor V-22, the onset of VRS can occur in the proprotor on one side without the other side losing lift. In such a case, the aircraft tends to roll sharply into the side that first loses lift, resulting in large, unexpected bank angles, followed immediately by a rapid dropping of the nose of the aircraft and a steep dive."

Arthur Fox-Ache
31st Jul 2006, 16:30
Why has it taken this long, since the Bell XV-15 was showing off back in the '70s?

Arfur :ok:

Sailor Vee
31st Jul 2006, 16:48
Why has it taken this long,One reason is that the USMC decided to change some of the specs, like upping the hydraulic pressure to 5000 psi from 3 grand, (they also decided to prefer their AV8B jockeys do the flying, whereas Bell used Heli pilots, they didn't have any problems regarding VRS!!).

The type rating, as far as the FAA is concerned, is to have a PPL in one discipline and a commercial licence in the other, this will qualify for a 'Powered Lift' category.

Mycroft
31st Jul 2006, 23:54
If I am not mistaken, the civilian version is the Bell 609.

Close, current designation is Bell/Agusta BA609:p