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david burton
25th Jul 2006, 19:52
Hi everyone.

I've been thinking about the following question for a while, and can't find much evidence on Google so thought I'd ask here.

"I've heard a glider can pull more g's than a fighter plane, is this true?"

I was looking for the world records and was under the impression a glider's light weight enables it to pull more g's

Any help gladly received!

pulse1
25th Jul 2006, 20:09
Never seen a glider pilot wearing a g suit!

david burton
25th Jul 2006, 20:21
I've heard of +8g's.... on this site too!

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!
25th Jul 2006, 20:36
my vote would be for the one where the wings can't be removed :hmm:

G-ZUZZ
25th Jul 2006, 20:50
The glider could easily out-'G' a fighter if the driver pointed it straight at the ground from 5000ft. But only for a millisecond or two.





(Hi everyone, I'm G-ZUZZ)

david burton
25th Jul 2006, 21:03
I'd heard it somewhere before... to be honest it makes sense a Glider can pull more g's, mainly because of the potential force on such a light object.

G-ZUZZ
25th Jul 2006, 21:09
That's what I say too but they insist gravity works equally on all objects, light or otherwise.

The original equal-opportunity proponent, Sir Isaac was.

And so far, none of them have managed to stay up there indefinitely, fighter, glider or any other you care to name.

green granite
25th Jul 2006, 21:29
The faster and tighter the turn the more g, ingnoring the pilot problem,
the maximum g for any aircraft is where the wings fall off :}

david burton
25th Jul 2006, 21:31
The faster and tighter the turn the more g, ingnoring the pilot problem,
the maximum g for any aircraft is where the wings fall off :}

surely some don't have the capacity to pull large G's, regardless of the strength?

anyone actually know the record for which type of plane can pull the most G's then?

green granite
25th Jul 2006, 21:45
In most cases I would agree with you I think, mainly due to the design of the contrlol surfaces?

I suggest you re-po$t this question on the test pilots forum you might get some sensible answers there:)

david burton
25th Jul 2006, 21:47
ok, will do. didn't know where it applied...

terryJones
25th Jul 2006, 22:03
Doesn't it depend on the speed of the conveyor belt...

green granite
25th Jul 2006, 22:04
Doesn't it depend on the speed of the conveyor belt...

only if you're taking off :rolleyes:

david burton
25th Jul 2006, 22:05
lol, I've heard that one....

AcroChik
25th Jul 2006, 22:50
"Doesn't it depend on the speed of the conveyor belt..."

Another (formerly great) aviation forum had a very long and very good thread about just this thing.

Patty Wagstaff's Extra 260 now in the Smithsonian Air & Space Museum has its G-meter pinned past +10.

She said the true transitional force was +12.

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!
26th Jul 2006, 00:22
She said the true transitional force was +12is that the acceleration of the acceleration? a sort of geegee?

Nay lad :=

Howard Hughes
26th Jul 2006, 00:27
my vote would be for the one where the wings can't be removed :hmm:
Is that the one with wings that fold up to fit in tight parking spaces?;) :}

AcroChik
26th Jul 2006, 00:59
A... argh...

Aye, lassie. G forces are caused by either acceleration or change in direction. The process of changing direction is a transition from one heading to another. I do, however understand your objection. These terms and their use are hotly debated.

Avtrician
26th Jul 2006, 04:51
Bit of an open ended question, as the direction and time span of the G forces are not mentioned.

A glider being launched off a carrier would probly shed/shred its wings. A glider in a tight turn may be subject to high instantaneuos (big word) G, but could it with stand that force for a prolonged time? The Pilot, not having a 'G'suit probly couldnt.

Some of the newer jets like F18 (OK so its not that new) have the 'G' forces limited by the computer system, to protect the pilot.

tinpis
26th Jul 2006, 05:05
:ugh: Why oh why oh why would you want to pull excessive G in a glider FFS?

Avtrician
26th Jul 2006, 05:15
Now that is a realy good question Tinny

Buster Hyman
26th Jul 2006, 05:34
Because Mr. Tin, engine noise on a fighter covers the sound of the wings ripping off, whereas in a glider, the sound would be crystal clear in comparison!:ok:

Krystal n chips
26th Jul 2006, 07:48
:ugh: Why oh why oh why would you want to pull excessive G in a glider FFS?

To get out of the way of some :mad: who is blissfully flying around with it's :mad: head in the office and thinking it's the only person in the whole wide airspace !!!----the Mk1 eyeball being a redundant feature here of course. "Oh that looks nice, I'll just turn right or left now, --oh gosh, there's another glider and he's waving at me---wonder where he came from?---never mind---it's a lovely day to bimble round the sky". :mad:

Had the experience of meeting the above "once or twice"---to put it mildly !!!

david burton
26th Jul 2006, 07:52
:ugh: Why oh why oh why would you want to pull excessive G in a glider FFS?

who knows? but the question remains. I guess I'm just interested to see which type of plane could do what.

as for prolonged time - I guess it'd be a couple of seconds.

it seems like the average glider can easily out-g the average plane, if you like?

Sedbergh
26th Jul 2006, 08:40
Most gliders (other than specifically fully aerobatic ones) are rated to about + 3.5 G in normal use (there's a big additional safety factor before the wings actually fold of course!) - which does not begin to compare with fully aerobatic aircraft, fighters etc which can go +10G.

Don't confuse pulling G with the ability to do very tight turns, which you can in a glider because the airspeed is very low (35 - 55 knots depending on type). The actual G forces being experienced are probably only about +2

4Foxtrot
26th Jul 2006, 08:48
I would have thought that pulling on the yellow and black handle in a fighter would put you through a few g...

Hideout
26th Jul 2006, 12:35
MDM 1 'fox':
http://www.sailplanedirectory.com/PlaneDetails.cfm?planeID=107
http://www.glideraerobatics.com/UK/glidertypemdmfox.php
+9 / -7 G

Swift
http://www.glideraerobatics.com/UK/glidertypeswift.php
+10 / -7 G

Not many blowtorches made by riveted aluminimum can cope with this :rolleyes:

david burton
26th Jul 2006, 19:28
cheers for the links!

I'm now biased towards the glider side of the argument, it looks like on average, a glider can pull more g's. (I say on average meaning your average glider compared to your average plane). A very generic saying, I know.