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Whirlygig
24th Jul 2006, 10:33
Is_it_any_wonder? (http://uk.news.yahoo.com/23072006/344/bath-chaps-jugged-hare-fading.html)

Bath chaps, jugged hare, tripe and onions are going out of fashion. Now ain't that just a crying shame :yuk: .

There's a good reason for it - they're 'orrible! For a start, hare is not a pleasant meat to prepare; I don't know many people who are happy to put up with the smell for a start. And neither does it sound like "healthy" fodder either; lard, suet, etc :yuk:

However, that article above blames the yoof of today for not knowing what these delightful delicacies are?! Well, they don't know what a Bedfordshire Clanger is 'cos it's a suet roly-poly thing with a savoury end and a sweet end used by the Brussel Sprout labourers in the days of yore!

Are there any "Olde Englishe" dishes you'd like to see back on the menu?

Cheers

Whirls

G-CPTN
24th Jul 2006, 10:38
Leak pudding.
http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/rc_tyneside.htm

lexxity
24th Jul 2006, 10:39
What are/is Bath Chaps?:confused: No, don't answer that, I just reread the article. YEUCK! :yuk: :yuk:


I notice they mention junket.:yuk: I'm glad that's dying out, childhood memories of childhood trips to see family in Devon and being made to eat such swill.:yuk: :yuk:

Capt.KAOS
24th Jul 2006, 10:39
Best 25 restaurants in the World:

The Fat Duck, Bray, Berkshire, Britain
El Bulli, Montjoi, Spain
French Laundry, California
Tetsuya’s, Sydney, Australia
Gordon Ramsay, London, Britain
Pierre Gagnaire, Paris, France
Per Se, New York, New York
Tom Aikens, London, Britain
Jean Georges, New York, New York
St John, London, Britain
Michel Bras, Laguiole, France
Louis XV, Monaco
Chez Panisse, California
Charlie Trotter, Chicago, Illinois
Gramercy Tavern, New York, New York
Guy Savoy, Paris, France
Alain Ducasse, Paris, France
Sketch (Gallery), London, Britain
The Waterside Inn, Bray, Britain
Nobu, London, Britain
Arzak, San Sebastian, Spain
El Raco de can Fabes, Spain
Checcino dal 1887, Rome, Italy
Le Meurice, Paris, France
L’Hotel de Ville, Crissier, Switzerland

G-CPTN
24th Jul 2006, 10:42
Definition: This British specialty is the lower portion of a pig's cheeks, which are cured somewhat like bacon. Chaps must come from a long-jawed pig rather than the flat-headed species. Though quite fatty, Bath chaps are served cold in the same way as ham, often with eggs. They can also be referred to simply as chaps. The name is assumed to have come from the original reputation of the chaps made in Bath, England.

lexxity
24th Jul 2006, 10:43
The Fat Duck. (http://www.fatduck.co.uk/):hmm:

Our very own Reddo has eaten there. The bill was enough to make me sick, never mind the snail porridge.

Barkly1992
24th Jul 2006, 10:44
Thank goodness old english food is dying out. The one thing that the invasion (1066) did was to bring some decent sauces to Engalnd and improve the cuisine.

scruggs
24th Jul 2006, 10:45
What's wrong with 10 pints and a vindaloo :confused:

Whirlygig
24th Jul 2006, 10:48
A fair point Capt. KAOS but not the one I was making. I know there are some very good restaurants in Britain NOW but somehow I can't imagine Nobu serving brawn on the menu! Or Bath Chaps.

Sorry Lexxity, but it's best you found out this way rather than the hard way i.e. have a plateful put in front of you!

Mind you, the French aren't much better when it comes to offal! Every restaurant in Lyons seems to specialise in calves chitterlings (Don't ask if you don't know!!)

Cheers

Whirls

lexxity
24th Jul 2006, 10:50
You are off course quite correct Whirlygig.

Off course up here we get to scare people with black pudding.:ok:

Mercenary Pilot
24th Jul 2006, 10:54
What's wrong with 10 pints and a vindaloo

Nothing...if your a light weight. 20 pints and a Phal is the way forward :p ;)



:yuk:

Whirlygig
24th Jul 2006, 10:55
Ah now you're talkin' Lexx. I love Black Pudding and you don't see it around much these days. I mean proper black pudding not that stuff mass-produced by Mmmm....

So that is one "Olde Englishe" foodstuff I would like to see more of.

Cheers

Whirls

lexxity
24th Jul 2006, 10:58
Whirls you can buy Bury Black Pudding in most of the butchers up here. We have it regularly. :ok:

Try this site. (http://www.buryblackpuddings.co.uk/)

ORAC
24th Jul 2006, 10:59
Out of favour

Ten most endangered savouries;

· Bath chaps
· Jugged hare
· Brawn
· Squirrel casserole
· Bedfordshire clanger (scrag end of mutton with kidneys)
· Pan haggerty (fried onions and potatoes)
· Hogs pudding
· Tripe and onion
· Faggots
· Bread and dripping

Ten most threatened puddings

· Calf's foot jelly
· Junket
· Sussex pond pudding (suet and lemon)
· Kentish pudding pie (rice and pastry)
· Dorset dumplings (apples and suet)
· Lardy cake
· Simnel cake
· Malvern pudding (fruit crumble)
· Singin hinnies (fried scone)
· Spotted dick

The Guardian:

.............The dishes listed in this research carry with them stories of urban and rural poverty (dripping toast and lardy cake) and the place of the pig in popular culture (Bath chaps). Many of them were the product of times when our grandparents and even our parents could not afford the levels of waste we now accept without thought. Is this a real basis for saying these dishes should be forgotten? More importantly, can we say they aren't utterly delicious? Well, perhaps not all, but just warm a piece of lardy cake (yes, even in the microwave) and load it with a compote of blackberries and a dollop of clotted cream, and tell me you don't feel nearer to heaven than with a spoonful of pannacotta or tiramisu.

Even if you are quite literally nearer to heaven if you eat too much of that particular combination......


Lardy cake

2 oz lard; 2 oz currants; 12 oz white bread dough, risen; 2 oz caster sugar; pinch of nutmeg; drizzle of honey

Roll out the dough to an oblong. Spread on lard and sprinkle with sugar, nutmeg and currants. Roll up like a swiss roll and place in a greased shallow baking tin. Cover and leave to rise for about 15 minutes. Brush lightly with honey and bake at gas mark five, 190C (375F) for 35 to 40 minutes. Serve hot with butter.


Bath chaps

Cut off pig's cheeks and pickle in brine for two to three weeks. Soak in fresh water overnight, then boil in a cooking bag for three to four hours. Leave to cool in the fridge; skin and roll in breadcrumbs. Serve cold with salad or slice thinly and fry in butter for an unusual delicacy

Whirlygig
24th Jul 2006, 11:04
Absolutely, let's hear it for lardy cake. In my old home of West Berkshire, there was no fear of Lardy Cake of dying out, not while Sheppard's of Chieveley baked the best ones in the world!

I had never heard of Lardy Cake until I moved to Newbury but soon discovered that it appeared to be a local delicacy. Can't get it up here in Norfolk; maybe I'll start to import it!

Cheers

Whirls

tinpis
24th Jul 2006, 11:11
I wouldnt trade any of that tack for the local witchety grub take -out


http://www.ozoutback.com.au/postcards/postcards_forms/abor_bushtucker_1/Image/au090221.jpg

ORAC
24th Jul 2006, 11:12
Pan Haggerty

A warming filling dish at a bargain price from the North of England. Use firm fleshed potatoes such as Desirée, Romano or Maris Piper as they will keep their shape and not crumble into mash at the end of the cooking time.

Serves: 4

25 Gram Butter (1 oz)
1 Tablespoon Vegetable oil
450 Gram Potatoes, peeled and thinly sliced (1 lb)
2 Medium Onions, thinly sliced
110 Gram Cheddar or Lancashire cheese, grated (4 oz)

Heat the butter and oil in a large heavy-based frying pan. Remove the pan from the heat and put in layers of potatoes, onions and grated cheese ending with a top layer of cheese. Cover and cook the vegetables gently for about 30 minutes or until the potatoes and onions are almost cooked. Uncover and brown the top of the dish under a hot grill. Serve straight from the pan.

ORAC
24th Jul 2006, 11:17
British Regional Cooking (http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/rc_index.htm) Some nice ones in their from Northumberland....

airborne_artist
24th Jul 2006, 11:19
Absolutely, let's hear it for lardy cake. In my old home of West Berkshire, there was no fear of Lardy Cake of dying out, not while Sheppard's of Chieveley baked the best ones in the world!

They still do - would you like me to post you one? Last enjoyed a Sheppard's LC a few days ago :ok: as our butcher sells Sheppard's produce.

I'm not sure it's local delicacy - we used to have one every Friday when I was a nipper, in S Hampshire, though a quick Google shows it originates in Wiltshire.

tony draper
24th Jul 2006, 11:29
Don't knock it we English chaps went out and conquered three quarters of the world on such fare.
:suspect:

Lon More
24th Jul 2006, 11:32
G-CPTN WTF is leak pudding? Main ingredient a dripping tap?

Whirlygig
24th Jul 2006, 11:33
I used the term "Local" loosely!!!:ok: They are adjoining counties to West Berkshire but as a web-footed flatlander I had never heard of Lardy Cake!

I remember my first one; in The Red Lion in Compton, served well after hours by the landlord, warm, sweet and very lardy! Bit like me really!!

Thanks for the offer airborne but I am still a frequent visitor to those parts and shall pick up a supply at the Newbury Show!

Cheers

Whirls

The SSK
24th Jul 2006, 11:37
British Regional Cooking (http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/rc_index.htm) Some nice ones in their from Northumberland....
What, no Stotty Cakes?
Use firm fleshed potatoes such as Desirée, Romano or Maris Piper
I don't recall me Mam sending me out for half a stone of 'Desiree, Romano or Maris Piper'.
110 Gram Cheddar or Lancashire cheese, grated (4 oz)
And as for cheese, there were only four kinds to be had in Wallsend back then: 'cheese' (Cheshire), 'empire' (bright orange rubber), 'blue' (Danish) and 'spready' (Dairylea).

Lon More
24th Jul 2006, 11:47
Pan Haggerty? Sounds like a posh Southern name for Stovies (http://www.stovies.com/)

ORAC
24th Jul 2006, 12:03
Ohh, I used to love stovies, but there were no cheese in me mums. That and Colcannon. (http://www.rampantscotland.com/recipes/blrecipe_colcannon.htm)

TnT.......
24th Jul 2006, 13:06
Well actually how about cows udders stuffed with liver, kidneys and truffles and then herbs and spices added and bound together and stuffed. Or another that has been off the menu for a long time was a series of birds stuffed one in to the other and then cooked and served up in Henry V111 court. A lot of the food that was old English was prepared, created because we were an island and importation of meats etc was as live animals so that the use of the animals in the English countryside was to the forefront. They used everything including the trotters and ears of the pigs and tongues and tails or ox. It is peoples perception of the food we eat that they hate. Conditioning. If you were used to it and nothing else you would not scoff at it. Look at those who eat cat and dog meat in parts of the world and those who don’t eat pig or cow!

I would love to see the traditional fare back again, including the old preserves that one finds in the cookery books of Mrs Beeton.

I was bought up on a health balanced diet of veg and fruit of the season and meat too. Today you just cook them slightly different to remove a lot of the fats from the meat and small quantities of anything is not really bad for you. It is when you go OTT then it becomes a problem.

lexxity
24th Jul 2006, 14:12
Lardy cake! I've only had it twice and it was lovely. Can someone down there tell me if anyone delivers it to those of us ooop in the grim north.

Whirlygig
24th Jul 2006, 14:14
Lexxity, we could get quite a little arrangement going here! What exchange rate should we use i.e. how many black puddings to the Lardy Cake?

Cheers

Whirls

G-CPTN
24th Jul 2006, 14:23
G-CPTN WTF is leak pudding? Main ingredient a dripping tap?
I intentionally left the typo, hoping to provoke a response.
This is a suet pudding filled with chopped leeks and served as an accompaniment to stews throughout Northumberland.
http://www.greatbritishkitchen.co.uk/recipes_result.asp?name=leekpudding

allan907
24th Jul 2006, 14:24
The one thing that the invasion (1066) did was to bring some decent sauces to Engalnd and improve the cuisine.

What's wrong with 10 pints and a vindaloo

Quite a piquant flavour one would presume :yuk: And what would one call that particular sauce then?? Jus de PatakHeneiken??

lexxity
24th Jul 2006, 14:25
Whirls let's say one black pudding is about 75p what rate is a lady cake?

Whirlygig
24th Jul 2006, 14:40
I'm not sure; they're big and heavy! We'll have to ask airborne artist nicely if he'll pop down to Sheppard's and get price/dimensions for us! I would think a Lardy of 8-9" diameter would be around £3.00?

Cheers

Whirls

Pan Pan Splash
24th Jul 2006, 15:12
Gimme good old fashioned Haggis anyday..:p

And you English needn't bother questioning Scottish Tastes, I saw a girl today with a Triple Chocolate Duck.. Seriously, 'tis true!!:ok:

Whirlygig
24th Jul 2006, 15:13
That's not like a Toilet Duck is it? :D :yuk:

Cheers

Whirls

tart1
24th Jul 2006, 15:18
a Bedfordshire Clanger is ... a suet roly-poly thing with a savoury end and a sweet end used by the Brussel Sprout labourers in the days of yore!

They still sell them in Gunn's Bakery on St Paul's Square ... I had one for lunch just last week.

Quite a mouthful, but makes a change from bland deep-chilled sarnies. :ok:

patdavies
24th Jul 2006, 15:29
Absolutely, let's hear it for lardy cake. In my old home of West Berkshire, there was no fear of Lardy Cake of dying out, not while Sheppard's of Chieveley baked the best ones in the world!

I had never heard of Lardy Cake until I moved to Newbury but soon discovered that it appeared to be a local delicacy. Can't get it up here in Norfolk; maybe I'll start to import it!

Cheers

Whirls

We discovered this lovely high-cholesterol delicacy after moving from Staffordshire to Cheiveley some years ago.

I was chairman of the village hall committee when Andrew Sheppard died. He gave so much, so freely to the village.

If you want to contact me off-line, I can mail some up to you - if Royal Mail don't regard it as a dangerous substance that is!

patdavies
24th Jul 2006, 15:38
Or another that has been off the menu for a long time was a series of birds stuffed one in to the other and then cooked and served up in Henry V111 court.
There's a company that does these by mail order for Christmas - but they're not cheap. £20/kg But they sound fantastic!
http://www.shoppersworld.co.uk/templated/southern/southern/everleighfarmshop/product.asp?s=202&d=1071&p=27913&c=11&s1=32&s2=208&s3=0

Also, this DM article
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/christmas/christmas.html?in_article_id=372276&in_page_id=1322&in_a_source=&ct=5

green granite
24th Jul 2006, 15:53
The last lardie cake I had was from a bakers in a small village in dorset, twer heavenly, one used to be able to get it from sainsburys many years ago but alas no lomger (mind you it must be almost neat cholesterol) :(:(

Black pudding I like but as Whirls says not easy to get a good example of it.

Whirls I think this (http://www.rutland-butchers.co.uk/sausages.htm) butchers at Melton Constable may do it they certanly do some excelent bacon cured with black treacle :cool:

Tart1 thanks for the info about Gunns must get there and get some when I go to the library next time :ok:

Bath chaps i've not seen for years but brawn my wife makes sometimes

ExSimGuy
24th Jul 2006, 16:08
Don't knock it we English chaps went out and conquered three quarters of the world on such fare.
:suspect:
And look what's happened since we went all poncey and refuse to eat half the animal :eek:

colmac747
24th Jul 2006, 16:21
Best 25 restaurants in the World:

The Fat Duck, Bray, Berkshire, Britain
El Bulli, Montjoi, Spain
French Laundry, California
Tetsuya’s, Sydney, Australia
Gordon Ramsay, London, Britain
Pierre Gagnaire, Paris, France
Per Se, New York, New York
Tom Aikens, London, Britain
Jean Georges, New York, New York
St John, London, Britain
Michel Bras, Laguiole, France
Louis XV, Monaco
Chez Panisse, California
Charlie Trotter, Chicago, Illinois
Gramercy Tavern, New York, New York
Guy Savoy, Paris, France
Alain Ducasse, Paris, France
Sketch (Gallery), London, Britain
The Waterside Inn, Bray, Britain
Nobu, London, Britain
Arzak, San Sebastian, Spain
El Raco de can Fabes, Spain
Checcino dal 1887, Rome, Italy
Le Meurice, Paris, France
L’Hotel de Ville, Crissier, Switzerland


Yes, but Britain is not England:=

*runs away incase a near future, new Anglo/Jock bashing thread shows its ugly head again*:p

G-CPTN
24th Jul 2006, 16:34
So let's have a few choice Scottish eateries. There MUST be some, if only for the quality of the ingreedyments (fresh fish and seafood).

Squat lobsters, eaten within an hour of being landed . . .

TVIR40
24th Jul 2006, 18:32
I love the old school puds, treacle tart, roly poly pud, spotted dick, gooseberry fool, upsidedown cakes and sherry trifles and things like steak and ale pie, pork pies, irish stew, roasts, leg of lamb, beef or pork!

I enjoyed wild boar when tried at a friends' house years ago.

I love clam chowder/lobster/crab etc but, they are not British traditional food, but Irish Oysters are something to die for!

G-CPTN
24th Jul 2006, 18:55
I love the old school puds, treacle tart, roly poly pud, spotted dick,
What about Fly Cemetry?

Whirlygig
24th Jul 2006, 19:25
What about Fly Cemetry?
That could be taken a number of ways :E

To all those to have offered to help me out with my renewed desires and urges for lardy cake, thank you; I have found a West Berkshire exporter who travels out East who has offered to help with a regular supply! But it might come from Hussey's rather than Sheppard's!

Cheers

Whirls

sixmilehighclub
24th Jul 2006, 19:32
I wouldn't say no to a Bath Chap thanks! :E (preferably complete with loofah!)

My mum used to make a nice Brawn. But it was more aspic/jelly with bits of chicken and pork. At least I think it was..... I hope it was.... :uhoh:

G-CPTN
24th Jul 2006, 19:42
That could be taken a number of ways :E
Fly Cemetery was the only name I know for slabs of pastry coated with currents. Must've been some goo to trap them.

Perhaps they used left-over frogspawn?

The SSK
24th Jul 2006, 19:43
Back in the mid-1970s BA briefly offered an "Elizabethan' menu choice in longhaul First and Club, there were about six dishes (one or two per flight), things like venison and boar cooked in rich sauces such as Madeira or Marsala with lots of spices like nutmeg and cinnamon.

I got to try it a few times, I always chose it because it was at least a bit different, but it was very badly received by the paying customers and disappeared after one or two seasons.

Gnirren
24th Jul 2006, 22:20
Don't even get me started on UK "food". Jesus h tapdancing christ it's the worst goop I've had to endure yet (and I've been around). I guess salt was outlawed around the time Lord Nelson croaked because nothing tastes anything, and as far as actually cooking it goes well it seems to follow the american tradition of "boil it in oil". Sunday roast my b*llz...

Get_me_out_of_here :(

Whirlygig
24th Jul 2006, 22:22
No, it just doesn't taste of salt!

Cheers

Whirls

Grainger
24th Jul 2006, 22:26
So let's have a few choice Scottish eateries. I always rather liked Murphy's Pakora Bar just down the road from Glasgow Uni. Interesting fusion of cultures.

Or how about a nice Haggis Pizza ?

Lon More
24th Jul 2006, 23:33
Grainger There was (is?) a fast-food outlet in Edinburgh's old Banana Market that specialized in venison burgers, served with a whisky sauce

Gainesy
25th Jul 2006, 08:37
I highly recommend Mr T.Esco's venison burgers (actually they call them grillsteaks but they are burgers). V.lean so grill slowly with a bit of butter on. Really good.

As to trad food, a good one round here is Sussex Bacon Pudding, sort of big steamed suet dumpling with bacon and onion in it, with onion gravy. Real stick to yer ribs winter stuff.:ok:

Foss
25th Jul 2006, 11:09
Living in my wee seaside coastal village, in sweet shops you can buy little wee paper bags of seaweed to eat. It's very old fashioned and traditional.
It's like eating salty rubber bands. It should be outlawed. :yuk:

eels are another one. God must have been having a laugh. 'Bet they can't cook that thing'. No you can't, because they're bl00dy horrible. And shops here sell them. (with a wee sticker saying 'traditional Irish recipe' on the front of a slimy tray of awfulness).

Fos

Whirlygig
25th Jul 2006, 11:25
Dulse. You're talking about dulse :yuk: . My father (AKA Me Da!) has a liking for the stuff. I had to share a car with several bags of it on a hot summer's day from Limavady to Larne then Stranraer to Newbury. Never ever again.

Cheers

Whirls

OverTq
25th Jul 2006, 11:40
Deep fried Mars Bar - now there's a healthy option!

Foss
25th Jul 2006, 15:37
Whirls
Yes, It is indeed dulse. Flipping terrible. May as well go down to beach and chew stuff off the sand. :yuk:

Could be worse, could be potted herring. :yuk: :yuk: :yuk:

Fos :)

reynoldsno1
26th Jul 2006, 22:32
Eee, don't forget parkin .... me Mum always used to make trays of parkin to eat around the bonfire on Nov 5th ..... reet good it was....