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View Full Version : Which arithmetical concept do you consider the most important to the physical world?


Onan the Clumsy
19th Apr 2006, 19:40
For me it's Exponentiation as it allows worlds to exist within worlds.

Without exponentiation, you wouldn't be able to both pick up an egg and crush a wallnut. You couldn't make the journey to your front door and one across the entire country.

What about for you?


:8

TimS
19th Apr 2006, 20:14
Onan,

1) Find lowest point in household

2) remove all tight clothing

3) lie down

and wait until the effects pass off !!!

colmac747
19th Apr 2006, 20:24
Ohms Law inter-twined with Pythagoras' Theorem, this inturn giving Ohms Theorem: Pythagoras' Law.

I also think Square Roots of Perfect Squares is a good 'un




:zzz:

con-pilot
19th Apr 2006, 20:26
Er, 2+2=5 (never really worked for me):E

BluntM8
19th Apr 2006, 20:29
I think it really has to be the Laplace Transform;

To Quote Wikipedia

In mathematics, the Laplace transform is a powerful technique for analyzing linear time-invariant systems such as electrical circuits, harmonic oscillators, optical devices, and mechanical systems, to name just a few. Given a simple mathematical or functional description of an input or output to a system, the Laplace transform provides an alternative functional description that often simplifies the process of analyzing the behavior of the system, or in synthesizing a new system based on a set of specifications.

I use it almost daily...:E

Blunty

tony draper
19th Apr 2006, 20:39
Compound interest. :E

flyblue
19th Apr 2006, 21:08
Well, in aviation it would be 1+1= >2 ;)

fmgc
19th Apr 2006, 21:13
Fermat's last theorem

PPRuNe Radar
19th Apr 2006, 21:41
The 'salary' equation, whereby the amount of month left always exceeds available funds :(

Grainger
19th Apr 2006, 21:42
Gotta be Imaginary Numbers.

Not many electrical applicances without 'em - and how would we live without an Espresso Machine ?

B Fraser
19th Apr 2006, 22:25
Maxwell's theorems, bloody clever bloke.

However, as this is a flyers forum ......Jacob Bernoulli who was a Swiss mathematician who was the first to use the term integral. He studied the catenary, the curve of a suspended string. He was an early user of polar coordinates and discovered the isochrone. And finally.... why curved surfaces induce a reduction in static pressure without which we would all go to Skegness or Bognor for our holidays.

joe2812
19th Apr 2006, 22:39
The theory of probability.

I might get round to doing something, but probably not.

Jerricho
19th Apr 2006, 22:57
Archimede's Principle:

When a body is immersed in water, the phone will ring. And it will probably be a telesaleman.

simon brown
19th Apr 2006, 22:57
Con Pilot

You are either an accountant or Gordon Brown...;)

tall and tasty
19th Apr 2006, 23:11
I rather like Sir Issac Newton and his theory of gravity "what goes up must come down".

It can be applied to so many things in a girls day :E

TnT:p

Disguise Delimit
19th Apr 2006, 23:14
Multiplication.

We wouldn't exist without it.

And it is such fun to practice!!:8

Blacksheep
20th Apr 2006, 06:43
Gotta be Imaginary Numbers. Not many electrical applicances without 'em...When I first put on a blue suit, they taught apprenti electrical theory the long way round, without j. That was before the electronic calculator too! They eventually showed us how to do it the imaginary way, but by then we were only interested in girls.

Being professionally involved with elecktrickery, I like Fourier's Analysis, but Disguise has it right - you can't beat multiplication, though long division can also be quite pleasant... :suspect:

acbus1
20th Apr 2006, 06:58
Most important arithmetical concept must be that what goes in (wherever) must come out, in part or in whole, or still be in there, in part or no longer.



Very "deep" of me, that is, but it'll be wasted on you lot. :rolleyes:

Crepello
20th Apr 2006, 07:00
A fiver is worth a thousand words. Officer.

ORAC
20th Apr 2006, 07:29
Fibonacci numbers...

Loose rivets
20th Apr 2006, 07:38
Calculating the acceleration on a conveyor belt.:}


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CashKing
20th Apr 2006, 07:50
A new approach to quantum gravity is presented based on a nonlinear quantization scheme for canonical field theories with an implicitly defined Hamiltonian. The constant mean curvature foliation is employed to eliminate the momentum constraints in canonical general relativity. It is, however, argued that the Hamiltonian constraint may be advantageously retained in the reduced classical system to be quantized. This permits the Hamiltonian constraint equation to be consistently turned into an expectation value equation on quantization that describes the scale factor on each spatial hypersurface characterized by a constant mean exterior curvature. This expectation value equation augments the dynamical quantum evolution of the unconstrained conformal three-geometry with a transverse traceless momentum tensor density. The resulting quantum theory is inherently nonlinear. Nonetheless, it is unitary and free from a nonlocal and implicit description of the Hamiltonian operator. Finally, by imposing additional homogeneity symmetries, a broad class of Bianchi cosmological models are analysed as nonlinear quantum minisuperspaces in the context of the proposed theory.

acbus1
20th Apr 2006, 07:58
I have to agree with some of that!

mean exterior curvature
That's what's most important arithmetical concept in my physical world.

36 - 28 - 36 typically. :E

tilewood
20th Apr 2006, 07:58
Income 3.50

Expenditure 5.50

That arithmetical concept, if unresolved, nearly always ends up with
a physical conclusion! :hmm:

Flying Farmer
20th Apr 2006, 08:03
Cash King beat me too it ;)

Loose rivets
21st Apr 2006, 01:30
A new approach to quantum gravity is presented based on a nonlinear quantization scheme for canonical field theories with an implicitly defined Hamiltonian. The constant mean curvature foliation is employed to eliminate the momentum constraints in canonical general relativity. It is, however, argued that the Hamiltonian constraint may be advantageously retained in the reduced classical system to be quantized. This permits the Hamiltonian constraint equation to be consistently turned into an expectation value equation on quantization that describes the scale factor on each spatial hypersurface characterized by a constant mean exterior curvature. This expectation value equation augments the dynamical quantum evolution of the unconstrained conformal three-geometry with a transverse traceless momentum tensor density. The resulting quantum theory is inherently nonlinear. Nonetheless, it is unitary and free from a nonlocal and implicit description of the Hamiltonian operator. Finally, by imposing additional homogeneity symmetries, a broad class of Bianchi cosmological models are analysed as nonlinear quantum minisuperspaces in the context of the proposed theory.

Yes, yes, yes.....but that only with the hydrodynamic type with flat metrics.

If I'm considering the flat submanifolds--with flat normal bundle in a pseudo-Euclidean space, then I look at it like this....





















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