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View Full Version : Badged Pavements - Why?


fireflybob
11th Apr 2006, 15:39
Recently I notice that a pavement near to where I live has been badged for the whole of it's length with signs every tenth of a mile showing a bicycle and pedestrian motif on a blue background. White markings have also been painted on the pavement with a dotted line about one foot from the kerb edge.

Can anybody explain to me why we need to be told what the purpose of the pavement is, why we need a line to tell us how close we should be from the kerb and who is paying for this nonsense? Small wonder the Council Tax is increasing about inflation when we are subject to such "nanny" state "directions" which do little to improve safety and spoil the appearance of the area.

Grainger
11th Apr 2006, 16:46
Gotta keep those council workers employed.

Same thing's happening around here. All this effort on something pointless, meantime road surfaces are crumbling, full of potholes and most of the white lines have worn off making driving very dangerous especially in the dark and/or when it's wet.

But there's no need to fix those of course, because as we all know accidents are only caused by motorists speeding. Leave the roads looking like a lunar landscape and send people fines through the post instead. :mad:

Krystal n chips
11th Apr 2006, 17:00
Pavements and crossings seem to be the current vogue at the moment--everywhere you go, they are being "renovated"--unlike the road that adjoins them of course. Pride of place for this excercise must go to the ( "hard to define without getting banned from this site " :mad: ) persons currently, a euphimism here "working" on the pavements at a little hamlet called Lindal in Furness--situated on the A590 Barrow road--which, as most people know, is the only and main arterial road in and out of the dump-so just a tadge busy. Who or what is reponsible for traffic "control":mad: must really need to er, review their intellectual capacity--under medical supervision. The timing is about 9 mins for each way--9:mad: minutes !!!----thus one can admire the scenic grandeur of the location :hmm: whilst waiting--and waiting---and :mad: waiting !--and all to replace a few curbstones--the nice notice says "work starts here for 13 weeks" !!!!.

Surplus brain cells to "Cumbria County Council, Highways Dept " please.

strafer
11th Apr 2006, 17:02
End of the financial year.

Unless councils spend all of their road budget, they can't get the same amounts for next year. They cannot transfer any surfeit to other council budgets (or just give it back to the people they stole it from in the first place). So Jan to Apr sees a huge increase in traffic 'calming' measures, unnecessary signage and general sillyness.

tilewood
11th Apr 2006, 17:07
'Give us a council job, guv'nor!!' :rolleyes:

acbus1
11th Apr 2006, 17:52
So, if I've got it right, this is all about Councils reaching the end of the financial year and kerbing their spending. They have to draw the line somewhere.

All in the interests of boosting their flagging resources.

Sounds to me that we have cyclepaths running the show. :uhoh:



I reckon we need to identify the hardcore offenders before they cover their tracks.

G-CPTN
11th Apr 2006, 17:59
Mrs G-CPTN observed a paint-crew applying the 'people' emblems onto the pedestrian half of a split footway/cycleway, and was surprised to see that the basic outline was drawn freehand in yellow 'chalk' before the paint-applier completed the masterpiece. These are probably funded by the Arts Council as Works of Creative Art, rather than merely mundane pavement artistry. Road Markings are usually applied through templates (artisan art?).
It's all whitewash!

Gingerbread Man
11th Apr 2006, 18:57
I can't believe the amount of roadworks i'm seeing at the moment. Some of them have their uses. Last week I drove along a recently refurbished part of the M1. It was painful whilst the work was going on, but to glide along this new, smooth, black road was bliss (it was also 0530 so I was moving). However, most are just frustrating. A bit of the A1 near Newark is being torn up, which i'm sure happened last year, so i've no idea why it's happening again. Near Grantham there was a line of cones laid out last week, closing one lane. Today they were collecting them up again. The only thing that had changed was that the speed camera box was missing :confused: .

I wish there was just a hint of organisation in some of the maintenance work - for example, only close off the bit of road that you're working on!! :mad:

Yet more proof that I should be in charge of everything :8 .

Ginger ;)

[Erm, just realised that wasn't really in keeping with the thread. I say get rid off all those railings in town centres - i'm fed up of jumping over them out of protest. What do they think; people will just trundle down the pavements if they're not there?]

Tex37
11th Apr 2006, 19:51
Back to traffic calming measures:-

It is just me or is there nothing more infuriating on this planet than traffic calming measures?

G-CPTN
11th Apr 2006, 20:42
I've never yet seen any 'public highway' traffic-calming measures that would have the slightest effect on a 'well-driven' Corsa (or the equivalent Chav Car).
I reckon that most of them merely enhance the experience of 'joy-riding' by providing chicanes and yumps in an urban environment.
They don't half screw-up the progress of an Ambulance though!
Have you ever ridden in an Ambulance over an undulating road-surface?

bfato
11th Apr 2006, 21:57
Bikes not normally being allowed on pavements, the markings are to show that an exception has been made. Not that the police do anything to stop people riding on the pavement these days. When I were a lad, we'd have got a clip round the ear before you could say Jack Robinson. And you could leave your back door unlocked and Waggon Wheels were twice the size.

Loose rivets
12th Apr 2006, 05:32
I have to say that I almost always ride my bike on the path while at home. I go from a small coastal town, along a main road and thought country lanes till I'm in't village. Often the three mile journey takes me over an hour, cos I spend so much time chatting to folk I meet on the way.

One day I stopped for a man and his two kids. So that they would not be tempted to walk on the road, I stopped right on the edge of the path (there was also grass before a hedge giving more width.) This guy wasn't having any of it...he wanted to have me off the path. Total confrontation.

"Most of the village rides along this path!"

Glare.

"I've been taking this route since before you were born." Glare, and broadening of shoulders.

"They wont normally prosecute children and OAPs for riding on the path...so, na ne,- na ne,- na na.

Then he spoke...with a Glasgow accent.

What I said next was almost certainly against some law, but it basically implied that miserable and belligerent people, with congenital hostility, could :mad: off from whence they had come. "People round here are friendly, a concept which I suppose is lost on you." I continued. (not kidding, this is exactly what I said.)

I haven't had a discussion about it with the local plod...yet, but my argument would be something along the lines of.... 'I have a right to safety...when you can protect me from speeding and reckless drivers on this 40mph stretch of road, I'll comply with the law, until then I'm staying where I'm safe'...er, apart from the odd Glaswegian that is.

paulc
12th Apr 2006, 06:00
If you want to blame anyone for road maintenance it should be central govt not local. Central govt hold the pursestrings with local councils 'topping up' income to cover a shortfall. The authority I work for (Conservative led, rich southern county) has had its grant cut by over 40million over the last 5 years and that is a lot of money. We are still expected to provide the same or improved level of service. Money is ringfenced for certain high priority tasks such as education & social services with anything left over being used for other local authority tasks.

Councils can / do apply for additional funding for certain types of schemes via a local transport plan which may have an emphasis on cyclesways and getting people out of cars etc.

As for a line of cones on motorways / trunk roads being left there with no obvious signs of work - 2 main reasons a) health & safety - it is far safer to place cones once and leave them than to move then each day b) cost.
All TM layouts are done to DoT regs (Chapter 8) and liasion with Police to suit specific road conditions / traffic levels etc.

The SSK
12th Apr 2006, 06:48
Over here in Belgium at least, if there is a signed cycle path (blue sign with either a bike, or a pedestrian and bike) it is supposed to be obligatory for cyclists to use it - they are not allowed on the road.

fireflybob
12th Apr 2006, 19:42
Recently I notice that a pavement near to where I live has been badged for the whole of it's length with signs every tenth of a mile showing a bicycle and pedestrian motif on a blue background. White markings have also been painted on the pavement with a dotted line about one foot from the kerb edge.
Can anybody explain to me why we need to be told what the purpose of the pavement is, why we need a line to tell us how close we should be from the kerb and who is paying for this nonsense? Small wonder the Council Tax is increasing about inflation when we are subject to such "nanny" state "directions" which do little to improve safety and spoil the appearance of the area.

The day after I posted, this issue was on the front page of the local paper - here is the link:-

http://www.nottinghameveningpost.co.uk/displayNode.jsp?nodeId=133965&command=displayContent&sourceNode=133948&contentPK=14312895&moduleName=InternalSearch&formname=sidebarsearch

terryJones
12th Apr 2006, 21:45
paulc
quote "As for a line of cones on motorways / trunk roads being left there with no obvious signs of work - 2 main reasons a) health & safety - it is far safer to place cones once and leave them than to move then each day b) cost."
Why not just get on with the bl00dy roadworks then, instead of just leaving them?
There must be something about road works that is hidden in the mists of time, a bit like having to plough a field, then leave it for a while before planting it to allow the frost to do its work on the soil. Do freshly dug up road surfaces have to be left unattended for days/weeks before a new surface is put on.
Modern councils getting rid of all their responsibilities to contractors nowadays, 'tis probably the digger uppers are a different lot to the lay it downers, and the concept of both working together seems alien to them.
Back in the early '70s I worked on the 'New at the time' Holiday Inn in Eindoven, Holland. The day the services were supplied was magic. About 0715 a gang of guys appeared, and within the hour the cobbles had been removed and a hole some 6 or 7 feet square and similar depth was dug.
By late afternoon there was NO evidence of the work ever having been done, the road was level, the cobbles relaid, gas, water, electricity and drainage were installed, and the traffic moved as normal.

acbus1
13th Apr 2006, 05:23
Ah! But! That doesn't cost the Council Tax payer as much (BTW, do they Go Dutch in Eindhoven?).