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boogie-nicey
3rd Apr 2006, 14:15
Did my eyes deceive me or did I catch a glimpse on the television of an advert (presumably Rimmel) with Kate Moss appearing in it.

I was under the impression that she had lost a lot of contracts due to her coke fuelled binges. Yet here she is already parading herself as if nothing's happened by a company that obviously pushing the acceptability of drug use in modern society as part of the night-life. That may be so but doesn't exmept the company from bad timing, so soon after Kate Moss herself got caught red handed and then fled to the states not to recover but more a shield from publicity. Upon her return she goes to the police station with her show biz lawyers to say "no comment".

I am amazed at the desperation of Rimmel to want to push for this normal acceptability of drug use and a showbiz personality that clearly has no shame. The whole "been up all night and look great by the morning" typifies what Kate Moss and her socialites stand for.

CharlieBarlie
3rd Apr 2006, 14:18
Did my eyes deceive me or did I catch a glimpse on the television of an advert (presumably Rimmel) with Kate Moss appearing in it.

I was under the impression that she had lost a lot of contracts due to her coke fuelled binges. Yet here she is already parading herself as if nothing's happened by a company that obviously pushing the acceptability of drug use in modern society as part of the night-life. That may be so but doesn't exmept the company from bad timing, so soon after Kate Moss herself got caught red handed and then fled to the states not to recover but more a shield from publicity. Upon her return she goes to the police station with her show biz lawyers to say "no comment".

I am amazed at the desperation of Rimmel to want to push for this normal acceptability of drug use and a showbiz personality that clearly has no shame. The whole "been up all night and look great by the morning" typifies what Kate Moss and her socialites stand for.

I believe she was already contracted to work for Rimmel before her drug habits came to light - my guess is that they just chose to stand by her.

boogie-nicey
3rd Apr 2006, 14:44
Ah yes I think I remember now the other sponsors realised that their brand/product wasn't tolerant enough in the market place and withdrew thier contracts. Rimmel on the other hand realised that this is actually a boost to their product with the 'party girl' rather than 'elegant' product line. Especially as such an endorsement was so publicly made by Kate.

In some respects this is great shame as Kate is still a great babe to say the least. However dancing with the devil like this could mean she comes off badly in the long run. Fast forward to the future and find that Rimmel's profits have been supplemented and yet Kate got tagged with the image that she never quite got to shed and with her having been dropped by Rimmel can't re-launch herself in the latter stages of her career due to this past baggage.

Sorry if that sounded all confused, just trying to get a point across.

GreenWings
3rd Apr 2006, 15:43
ISTR Kate Moss was in an advert for Opium, by YSL, last year. Rather ironic. Guess they havent launched a fragrance called Crack yet...

GW

lexxity
3rd Apr 2006, 15:49
Ms Moss is not doing badly at all, yes she was dropped by several companies, but is now getting enough work to maintain her lifestyle.

She is the face of virgin mobile, worth 1.2mil, house of longchamp and the pirelli calender to name but a few. She's managed to shake the rep off fairly quickly.

ORAC
3rd Apr 2006, 15:51
There ain't no such thing as bad publicity...

The Independent : 26 February 2006.

The supermodel Kate Moss is on the verge of signing one of the most lucrative contracts of her career just six months after a cocaine scandal had appeared to end her reign as Britain's most successful model. Her publicist confirmed yesterday that Moss, 32, is in talks over a deal thought to be worth close to $2.6m (1.5m) with the US fashion giant Calvin Klein - boosting her earnings to around 9m a year, almost double that before she was photographed snorting cocaine.....

boogie-nicey
3rd Apr 2006, 16:14
wow, I'm in the wrong game for sure.

Jerricho
3rd Apr 2006, 16:17
Yet another example of somebody who you would tell you kids not to associate with cause "they use drugs!!!" coming out smelling of roses. I conceed, we all make mistakes, but FFS. Long list there.

boogie-nicey
4th Apr 2006, 09:15
However thinking about her boyfriend or ex-boyfriend is in constant trouble with the law over his 'in your face' use of drugs and the downside is he doesn't even have talent :)-

What a joke have you really descended to this new low. At least in the past we had people who might have 'gone over the line but had a personality and a degree of presence such as Oliver Reed, George Best. That's probably because they genuinely descended into that type of problem rather than Pete Doherty's of today.

acbus1
4th Apr 2006, 09:28
I guess Pepsi will be desperate for her services....

"Coke did my head in. Now I use Pepsi"

"Try Pepsi! Not to be sniffed at!"

"Drink Pepsi from the bottle to stay away from the can"

etc.

As I See It
4th Apr 2006, 09:33
Being Britain's most successful super model must have been a great strain, I guess she just 'cracked' under the pressure:ooh:

chuks
4th Apr 2006, 09:36
Not so long ago you used to see lots of adverts with beautiful young things looking all floppy and 'nodded out,' as if they were using heroin, hence the name. The usual commentators fumed with indignation while the usual suspects denied that they were glamourising drug abuse. No, they were just doing whatever it took to sell their schmattas. Then they would donate some money to a charity and put their PR people onto the problem until it went away.

Life moved on, so that today we have models documented as real-life drug abusers. Cue yet more indignation and denials and increasing sales. So that is alright then.

I have a new flat-mate, a real cute little lady from South Korea who seems to be some sort of fashionista. Glossy mags are piling up in the kitchen that further my education. Posh never smiles because her teeth are too toothy and Kate is going to sort her life out by having a baby and the new look for this season is to look like a balloon or else like a chop stick or perhaps first one and then the other. It sure beats reading about Air Law and such, but only for a few minutes.

This morning I read a think piece about a young couple who decided to eschew children in favour of buying really neat stuff. There was a picture of the woman's beautiful car - some shiny little crap box of a two-seater ragtop. No room for a baby there, for certain, so that this looked like a very reasonable driver for lifestyle choices.

All these overpopulated countries: could we just donate shiny little two-seaters to their mothers as a form of population control? It would be more fun than condoms.

Devlin Carnet
4th Apr 2006, 09:46
to be honest, I cant understand why people rave about her, just an averagely plain looking woman IMHO, See better walking around Tescos on a saturday morning.

Banjo
4th Apr 2006, 10:14
Devlin Carnet
couldn't agree more. Having spent too much time with Kate sat up front while flying her I can safely say that our local Tesco has far more attractive looking women in on a Saturday morning and I'm sure that talking to them would not be such a depressing time either,

Banjo.

boogie-nicey
4th Apr 2006, 10:20
Wow, let me know which branch of Tescos? :) :) Some good gags there about "coke doing my head in" :D

But it goes without saying that there are 2 faces to 'glossy' industry which on the one hand wishes to look responsible but deep down celebrate the behind closed doors aspect of night life where drugs are celebrated. Fine if that's their wish or desire then so be it (free country, thank goodness) but with that personal freedom comes personal responsibility. After all if I turn up for work late a couple of days in a row I'm out of a job yet these people seem to be caught red handed with all manner of evidence and nothing happens and in fact corporates start to queue up at the door :hmm:

My only concern is that they keep their rubbish from spilling out onto the rest of society.

Binoculars
4th Apr 2006, 10:54
Is there anyone with an IQ over 100 who cares?

lexxity
4th Apr 2006, 12:26
This morning I read a think piece about a young couple who decided to eschew children in favour of buying really neat stuff. There was a picture of the woman's beautiful car - some shiny little crap box of a two-seater ragtop. No room for a baby there, for certain, so that this looked like a very reasonable driver for lifestyle choices.

I read that article recentely, basically the couple were filling their lives with more and more material goods and how they could go away all the time and how they were so fulfilled. Then they went and bought some more stuff. Yep, sounded like they were really happy.:rolleyes:

Binoculars
4th Apr 2006, 12:32
Hmm, promising stuff, but it's not going to get far in this thread. Come on, somebody start up a thread suggesting those who don't have kids are shallow materialists who know little of real life, or alternatively that those who do have kids make their own choice which shouldn't be subsidised by those intelligent enough to realise that there are better things to do with one's time and money.

Come on, you know you want to! Sounds like something Drapes could get his teeth into. :hmm:

lexxity
4th Apr 2006, 12:37
Binos my point was this couple were so desperate in their explanations of materialism and it's benefits that I really doubted them. I'm not saying it's a bad thing not to have kids, but this couple were so vacuous and shallow it beggard belief!

Binoculars
4th Apr 2006, 12:41
Wasn't directing anything at you personally, lexxity. It's a topic I have pondered over the years and tried to come up with an opinion about who has got it right. There is of course no single answer, but those who loudly claim their own view as being the only correct one are, I think, suffering from a certain delusion.

Mind you, you could say that about those who only see one side of ANY subject, couldn't you?

tony draper
4th Apr 2006, 12:42
shallow materialists, you called? :rolleyes:

boogie-nicey
4th Apr 2006, 12:54
But isn't that Kate and her brigade are all about 'shallow materialists' like decipels of a cult that everyone can see through other than themselves?

Maybe this whole drug+materialism+it's worship is all just one big dellusion. I personally hate it as their actions seemed to indirectly praised let alone punished. In fact I can hear it now on her first appearance since her Coke ordeal and how she has had to suffer and she's the victim in all of this which the cruel world doesn't seem to understand, please pass me a bucket :hmm:

Binoculars
4th Apr 2006, 12:59
Why don't you try not bothering to read any articles about her or other "celebrities"? They can't be hard to spot. If your current source of information has nothing but similar articles, consider changing. I mean, www.drudgereport.com contains enough information to keep you occupied 24 hours a day, and no matter who you are you'll find something that you agree with.

bar fly
4th Apr 2006, 13:09
and the downside is he doesn't even have talent

I'd disagree with you there boogie-nicey. Pete Doherty is an extremely talented singer/songwriter IMO. Perhaps he copes with his problem in a less entertaining way (dont think that makes any difference to its acceptability) because he his a lot younger than George Best & oliver Reed.

Off the thread I know, but I think Doherty is musically brilliant. :ok:

boogie-nicey
4th Apr 2006, 13:23
Hey Rock on Bar Fly, I guess you know more about the music industry than I do :)

I guess I'll just wait for the "Best of Pete Doherty" album.

1. Cocaine is God's way of saying you earn far too much.
2. I'm all shot up
3. Reality is a crutch for people who can't handle drugs
4. I stayed on the drugs in fear of being branded a quitter
5. Time is never wasted when you're wasted all the time
6. Work is the curse of the cocaine socialites

However as a footnote I think the Kate Moss and Pete Doherty's of the celeb machine have ensured that there's no room in today's drug culture for amateurs :)
It's all pros from here on now

Binoculars
4th Apr 2006, 13:32
Hey, didja see that photo of Whitney Houston? Wow! Whoever would have thunk it?

boogie-nicey
4th Apr 2006, 13:36
I have climbing Mt. Everest for the last few weeks, what photos of Whitney ???? Where ????

Binoculars
4th Apr 2006, 13:39
Check your normal reading matter. It's a couple of pages past Kate Moss.

G-CPTN
4th Apr 2006, 13:40
http://www.heraldsun.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5478,18678789%255E663,00.html

Binoculars
4th Apr 2006, 13:57
:hmm: :hmm:

bar fly
4th Apr 2006, 14:03
I guess you know more about the music industry than I do

Maybe, maybe not. Have you listened to the Libertines or Babyshambles? I doubt it. Of all the things that people could (and have called) him - that's the first time I have ever heard lack of talent mentioned. But yeah he's a druggy and a bad role model, talentless he is not.

Its just an opinion as I said.

boogie-nicey
4th Apr 2006, 14:22
wow move Kate Moss, Whitney's the new number 1

In fact it's enough to make Kate clena up her act and get back into some honest work. What a loser couldn't even make it as a successful cocaine addict, what with all the publicity :)

Devlin Carnet
5th Apr 2006, 08:46
Strike that about Tescos
I was in the Trafford centre last night...Wow...:ooh: :ooh: :ooh:

bar fly
5th Apr 2006, 09:04
Its bizarre how a huge shopping centre seems to only attract beautiful young ladies. I have noticed that the Trafford Centre seems to be like a bright light to insects for young honeys. Do ugly ones not share the same shopping addiction?

Or do we just not notice them? :confused:

boogie-nicey
5th Apr 2006, 09:12
London's too far from the Trafford Centre, you lucky guys :ok:

Navajo8686
5th Apr 2006, 09:16
Would I be either (a) heartless or (b) not politically correct if I were to wonder when all these scumbags are going to take one dose to many and save us from having to hear about their 'poor, unfortunate lifestyles'?
There are thousands of people dieing in this world because they cannot get clean water yet Moss, Doherty, Whitney and co are blowing (literally) fortunes.
Before anybody accuses me of being callous (guilty there m'lud) remember that it could be their son or daughter or grandchildren following the great Moss because 'she is a roll model and if she does drugs then obviously they're ok'.
People like Moss make me want to :yuk:

skyjunky
5th Apr 2006, 09:55
The funny thing is, on the back of one of the trash mags this month Rimmel have got Kate Moss doing an ad for an anti-fatigue foundation that brightens up your complection after a hard night on the tiles. They've got the right lass for the job there, eh?

I can't believe these people are allowed to be role models for our kids. Look at the state of the formerly sweet Britney Spears these days. She looks like a white trash coke wh**e. What happened to the good old days where we had role models like Rod, Jane and Freddy and Janet Ellis on Blue Peter? Why can't society idolise people who do good for humanity and actually have some talent insteat of glorifying drug addicts and general n'aer do wells?Our 'idols' these days really don't deserve their status.

AAAGGGHHHHH!!!!!:*

Solid Rust Twotter
5th Apr 2006, 10:00
It is the way of things, Grasshopper...:(

Celebrity for celebrity's sake.

chuks
5th Apr 2006, 12:11
I kinda like the sound of that, 'role model.' I have definite jerk tendencies anyway, so why not let it all hang out and end up with hordes of little jerklets emulating me? That way, instead of having to get grief from the straight citizens and make feeble attempts to behave I can redefine normal even further from what used to be normal and become some sort of hero figure to the yoof of today. I might even be able to be paid for doing this, judging by all these other role models out there on the streets.

Where do I sign up?

The last time I did something like this I took out a poetic license and quoted Philip Larkin's 'These Be the Words' to the Chief Pilot's wife. She was mildly interested but he was not amused. Some sort of Philistine, there.

Jerricho
5th Apr 2006, 14:59
Would are going to take one dose to many and save us from having to hear about their 'poor, unfortunate lifestyles'?

Ahhhh, but you would still "hear about it". The poor unfortunate mega-star who lead such a shitty life who was taken so prematurely from this mortal coil.

I'll join you in tha callous stakes. Who remembers when River Phoenix died out the front of that nightclub or whatever. What was the quantity of drugs in his system? Yet I remember candlelight vigils and associated crap. The guy overdosed. What about when Mr K. Cobain from chewed on the business end of a shotgun. Now, I am not for a second making light of suicide, but to this day on VH1 or MTV or whatever the psychoanalytic bullsh*t still goes on about how his turmoil influenced the music of Nirvana. The guy was a drug addict plain and simple. Yeah, I probably sound a bit like an asshole, but it's true.

bar fly
5th Apr 2006, 15:05
True, but he also had a stomach condition that meant he was continuously in pain.

boogie-nicey
5th Apr 2006, 15:22
We all have something or another 'going on' but the majority stick out and don't take the route of drugs

bar fly
5th Apr 2006, 15:33
True, Snorting coke and sucking on a shotgun isn't too much of a hot idea (although the gun one probably was).

I guess I sound like I am sticking up for these guys being druggies (Pete Doherty and Kurt Kobain), but i just can't help but think that until we have been in their position of fame and wealth, we cant really judge them. They made bad decisions and one of them is dead - but people kill themselves slowly every year smoking as well - just not in the limelight. That is equally stupid, and whilst it doesn't influence people indirectly (as a role model to millions of kids) it does directly by sharing their smoke. Although lets not re-open that can of worms.

I'd still choose to remember all these 'celebrities' for their musical talent rather than the stupid things they did/do in their lives.

Jerricho
5th Apr 2006, 16:09
Sorry barfly, I had forgotten about his stomach condition.

And it's commendable that you remember the like of Cobain et al for their notable accomplishments. but you don't have to be an ultra rich person to f*ck yourself up on drugs. I really did smile when I read boogie-nicey's post about the Pete Doherty album. Granted, we all can (and have) made stupid decision and choices in life. But taking responsibility for those decisions is required as well. When I hear comments along the lines of "Kurt was a role model for anguished Gen-Xers"......gimmie a fricken break. I fall into that quagmire of a generation, and he certainly isn't a role model for me (Responsibility for one's actions? What the hell is that? I'll sue your ass for that!!). Yet I wonder how many people sadly took their lives in an attempt to emulate him (or others)? Funny you mention smoking (can of worms aside ;)), as that certainly falls in to the genre of behaviour that may be emulated by the impressionable.

boogie-nicey
6th Apr 2006, 14:03
Perhaps the problem is the inabaility to produce an equivalent role model that's more inclined to positive orientations. After all when I was growing up I'd hear about Evil Kenevil (rock on :)), Lee Majors as Steve 'Hero' Austin, Chuck 'all guts' Yeager, Jackie 'champion' Stewart and the 'Fonz'. They were cool and seemed to have something a positive message to send out, in other words a bit of backbone. What have almost all of todays celebs got to offer ...... nothing, in fact most people have to scratch their heads to figure out "hmm, why are they famous for again???".

So Kate 'take the short cut' Moss is just a face which in itself is fine because there have always been models. However what isn't cool is the dispensation of a bit of responsibility, dignity and/or shame for personal actions. The public are quite forgiving and understanding if you know how to play it. But the trick is to have the bottle to admit you fell off the staright and narrow, that's something Kate and her mates aren't capable of.

No wonder they need drugs and other material substitutes they have little persuasion in terms of reality.

airship
6th Apr 2006, 14:17
And here's (http://www.katemoss.biz/) the aviation connection to this thread. Kate's entry into the fashion industry all started in 1988, when she and her family were in JFK Airport on their way back from a vacation in the Bahamas. The then 14-year-old Kate caught the eye of Sarah Ducas of Storm Agency, who approached her. This chance encounter was the launching pad of Kate's hugely successful career. One wonders how many years one would get today if one approached a 14 year old female in a public place with the idea of using her body to sell stuff...?! :uhoh:

boogie-nicey
7th Apr 2006, 09:04
Saw the gal again on the Virgin Mobile ad, speaking to her agent, etc, etc. The whole "butter wouldn't melt", "look how innocent and confused I look" makes me wonder how these companies are acting so irresponsibly, at least wait a little longer. They could then claim look she's gone through the rehab and addressed the problems. No one believes that she's gone thorugh any kind of treatment in such a short space of time, they're just taking the piss.

When an athlete gets caught at the Olympics taking drugs they are out even during the inevitable period of denial to the media. They loose their numerous sporting and other sponsorships deals. Yet Kate seems to have embarked on another course, one in which she CAN take drugs and that it's OKAY and the public and legalislators are the ones who need to get over it. Fine in that case spare the pathetic outpourings of grief when these celebs fall of their platform, responsibility for your own actions comes to mind.

bar fly
7th Apr 2006, 09:29
Exactly. Sadly though, the fact is that the more press she receives for being a druggie, the more her profile is raised and therefore the more employable she is. So in some bizarre and twisted way, she profits from being convicted of drug offences. It would be nice if her career was ruined in an equal way to that of a sporting star (although she is not using performance enhancing drugs), but even in the celebrity industry there are inconsistencies. I think it was Richard Bacon who was a presenter of the kid's show Blue Peter in the UK whose career was stopped dead after being caught with cocaine (though he is appearing again lately on telly).

So there's no system for this other than if anyone considers you employable, you are off the hook. I would question the sort of eejit that would buy something because there is a celebrity advertising it, but sadly it is usually youngsters who don't know any better.

Show Business = lots of eejits being made rich by lots of eejits. Having said that, I am one of those eejits.

boogie-nicey
7th Apr 2006, 09:59
Bar-fly: I don't really want to see her career ruined or anyone elses. I just want to see a degree of self control and responsibility because that'll make for a better person in the longer term.

Kate and her mates are nothing more than modern day court jesters that are to perform by the order of the King (corporates) and is to be granted safe passage to appear (no social/legal restrictions apply to her).

If she hasn't treated this problem then it won't go away and the media have eyes everywhere they'll catch her again at some point. Which is unfortunate because next time round she may not be able to recover sufficiently and yet we the public will be blamed for hounding her ! :D

BombayDuck
7th Apr 2006, 10:28
The same's true out here.... actor - for want of a word that lives up to his lack of talent - got caught up in a bust while trying to buy from a dealer for whom the trap was set.

Sadly he landed his biggest contracts and movies AFTER this fiasco. In fact the owner of one of the fashion houses for whom he's top model was also caught in a drug bust. Led to the wagging of a lot of tongues, it did :hmm:

Been part of a bunch of ten people at a party and the other nine were smoking joints (well, one joint at a time was being passed around). Left me feeling a little odd....

G-CPTN
7th Apr 2006, 10:34
Left me feeling a little odd....
Possibly passive smoking . . .

bar fly
7th Apr 2006, 11:22
Me:


It would be nice if her career was ruined


Boogie-nicey.Yeah I don't mean that, I really mean that I wish it was consistent for all people - sports stars or super models. It doesn't seem right that crimes only affect some of these careers. The way I see it is that if, as you say, she isn't able to recover sufficiently one day, then she deserves little sympathy from the public. She profited from the public, used that profit to harm herself in front of the public, and could ended up hurting herself seriously in front of the public. I agree also that these are her choices and its her responsibility only.

BombayDuck. It does prove the addage ' there's no such thing as bad publicity'. In these cases, quite the opposite.

I hope she succeeds and comes to her senses, but I suspect she could end up like Whitney Houston.

frostbite
7th Apr 2006, 12:11
I will admit to applying a certain amount of double standards here.

It doesn't concern me that people like this choose to spend their money on ruining themselves.

The ones that concern me are those who rob and injure/kill others to do it.

ChocksAwayUK
7th Apr 2006, 12:39
True frostbite - if drugs like this had never been made illegal the world would be a FAR better place - thing is it seems to late to reverse the process now, at least without a lot of interim problems. I blame america.

boogie-nicey
7th Apr 2006, 14:35
I'm sure America isn't solely to blame as there are no doubt numerous variables for this world wide problem.

Could even be that shady government elements raise funds via drugs trafficing? No accountability to the government masters or the public yet able to finance all manner of overseas activities. (recall CIA in Vietnam). But I digress what's really burning people's stomachs is the fact that Kate has not only got away with it but with minimal effort. The same rule doesn't apply to us in any stretch of the imagination and though this is the unfortunate reality of of the celeb/establishment world is it necessary to flaunt it in the public's faces. "Look I'm back at work having been caught drugs and now have the audacity to tell others what they need to buy". Do you think child molester (perish the thought) would be able to return to work after being caught and then told after the briefest of investigations (if there really was one in the first place) that everything's okay. Yet she's building up the inevitable chat show with questions approved mercilessly by her agents and give one of those "but this is vunerable side of Kate the public don't see".

Sort yourself out girl, didn't your mother teach you anything about the fundamental basics of life.

Biggles Flies Undone
7th Apr 2006, 14:55
I (honestly) used to class myself as a 'bleeding heart liberal' - but I clearly haven't moved with the times.

This is simple logic as far as Class A drugs are concerned:
- They fcuk you up
- They are expensive
- They add to the profits of crime

SO
- if you are poor, you must steal to pay for your habit
- if you are rich and in the public eye, you are setting the worst possible example

What is cool or clever about taking hard drugs? Why do people look upon druggies as some kind of cult hero?

Please spare me the apologist huggy fluff crap. People in the public eye who are caught using hard drugs should be made an example of - preferably with a public flogging. A smack on the wrist, a touch of contrition and a doubling of earning power really don't seem to get the message across, do they?

ChocksAwayUK
7th Apr 2006, 15:18
Well the America comment was slightly tongue-in-cheek boogie - but as I understand it, it was them started all this prohibition malarkey at the beginning of the last century, largely for political and economic reasons - and just look how crime and addiction has sprung up as a result. Anyway.. that's another topic I suppose.

As for Kate, well I'm gonna stick my neck out here and say I don't think she's done anything wrong. 90% of the UK adult population take drugs to some degree or other - what sort often depends on our job, lifestyle, background etc. Rimmel, however are way irresponsible. They're a children's/young teen's brand and Kate is obviously not a good example to their target market. Thing is they're actually quite a small brand and were nothing a few years ago until they signed KM. Kate made them as a co. and they can't afford to let her go. Notice how most of the established designers did end their contracts with her... they could afford it. I suppose you could argue that Kate should have refused the contract on moral grounds but morals are rarely used when it comes to business, and she is a business.

bar fly
21st Apr 2006, 13:07
I think the argument is that when she commits her crime, millions of influencial youngsters that look up to her and often try to emulate her, see her doing it.

If she only had the ability to harm herself then I for one would say 'fair enough go ahead and f*ck yourself up'.

boogie-nicey
21st Apr 2006, 14:11
Very true, people are free to do what they want but are responsible for their actions. How would we all feel if we came across some guy in the reception area bragging about how he has padded his logbook, got signed off by his Uncle who was supposedly an examiner, etc, etc ... Then you find he gets the job! That's the same priniciple that applies to Moss and Co. they step (rather leap) over the line and then expect to get even more from society than before. Well lets all go out and do something similiar in life shall we? I doubt we would last long without being pulled by the collar and branded a zero rather than a celeb hero.

What gets people wound up is the 'exemption' factor of these celebs, which okay they don't have to queue up and yes they get things free and yes they get a hefty payday compared to the rest of us for relatively little work. But when they go this far out of bounds then why are they able to shurg it off, drugs are still a criminal offence along with undeniable photographic evidence which would be more than enough to have someone like me banged up a long time ago.

Then we have the issue of self shame, you know when the teacher made the point of "you can all thank so and so for being kept behind after hometime", or "you're not going to make yourself very popular with the rest of the class". This was supposed to induce a degree of self respect and in negative situations self shame at least for later life. Clearly such reminants are long gone from the shameless Moss, does she think we are stupid? How many of you could walk into your boss's office and snort cocaine on his table in full view of him and then return to work the following week holding your head high as if nothing had happened.

boogie-nicey
21st Apr 2006, 20:58
DfcBaron,

I still think Clint Eastwood is cool and no I am nothing like that Little Britain character you mentioned FRA FROM IT. But neither can I sit back in an idle fashion and not make a call on something I see in society or life as a whole. I am not the one sitting in judgement but merely offering an opinion qualified by the fact that I might just care a shred about this issue. In fact I would go far as to say even for Kate Moss if she wants to turn it around and get off the trendy bandwagon of socialite drug use.

Brain washed, not in the way you're thinking sunshine. Brain washed in terms of learning from my experiences and knowing where the line is drawn between right and wrong. Brain washed by parents from their sacrifices and teachings which were to always listen as much as you speak whilst being fair, after all who's to say I am right?

Please offer an opinion not just a couple of cheap comments, who are you anyway Pete Doherty lawyer?

wint3rmute
22nd Apr 2006, 01:46
How many of you could walk into your boss's office and snort cocaine on his table in full view of him and then return to work the following week holding your head high as if nothing had happened.

Not so uncommon in many London-based media and financial co.s.. obviously not the norm throughout the UK but no biggy really. All about your lifestlye and culture I spose - your example could be transposed to a Pakistani Muslim giong out for Friday night drinks with his boss in Lahore... though I'm sure that would be much less acceptable.

henry crun
22nd Apr 2006, 10:30
dfcbaron, It's about time you changed that fly.

frostbite
22nd Apr 2006, 14:42
Please do not feed the trolls.

Jerricho
22nd Apr 2006, 14:44
Excellent point Frosty..........withdrawn.

That'll learn me to keep my hangover to myself. Maybe I need a pick me up................Coke anyone?

jet_noseover
22nd Apr 2006, 14:57
Got a feeling that The Real Slim Shady and dfcbaron are good mates....:rolleyes:

Jerricho
22nd Apr 2006, 15:06
I prefer my coke with a ice and perhaps a little dash of lime, thank you very much.

Rots yer guts though.

Jerricho
22nd Apr 2006, 15:45
No Asda in Canada :rolleyes:

I suppose you'll be telling us next you mix it with single malt.

Jerricho
22nd Apr 2006, 18:38
*Shrug*

You got me there.

G-CPTN
15th Jun 2006, 01:22
Kate Moss will be officially cleared of cocaine allegations on Thursday despite police being convinced she took the drug.

Scotland Yard spent seven months investigating the 32-year-old model after she was pictured apparently snorting the banned substance in a recording studio.

The Daily Mail can reveal that after taking a number of witness statements, detectives obtained strong "circumstantial" evidence that she took "line after line" of cocaine.

But despite extensive inquiries, they were unable to find any forensic proof to support their claims.

The Crown Prosecution Service lawyers finally concluded there is insufficient evidence to charge Miss Moss with possession of a Class A drug. An announcement will be made after she is formally informed of the decision at lunchtime.

The decision to take "no further action" against Miss Moss came after police expressed concerns that a "disproportionate" amount of resources had been ploughed into the case.

It is thought the probe - ordered by Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Ian Blair as part of a clampdown on middle-class cocaine users - cost up to 250,000.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/showbiz/showbiznews.html?in_article_id=390714&in_page_id=1773&in_a_source=