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None of the above
8th Mar 2006, 18:18
From the BBC website..........

"The national Census is to include a question on national identity so people can say if they consider themselves Welsh, Scottish, Irish or British".

What about the English? At the last count there were about 50,000,000 of us!

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4786672.stm

Wingswinger
8th Mar 2006, 19:30
That's cos you English aren't really British. You stole the island from us Celts.

Yma o hyd!

Ozzy
8th Mar 2006, 19:39
Doesn't it depend on who's playing?:E

Ozzy

acbus1
9th Mar 2006, 06:24
Whenever a form asks for my nationality, I always state "English".

I have zero affinity for the Scots, Welsh or Irish. That's putting it mildly.

Mind you , I'm none too thrilled with 90% of the English, either.

:\

Wingswinger
9th Mar 2006, 06:48
Whenever a form asks for my nationality, I always state "English".
I have zero affinity for the Scots, Welsh or Irish. That's putting it mildly.
Mind you , I'm none too thrilled with 90% of the English, either.
:\

Wouldn't it just be awful for you to discover Scots, Welsh or Irish ancestry? The chances are you have some. :E

acbus1
9th Mar 2006, 06:56
Och noooooo, laddie, yer talkin a load of ahrr hy de nos, ta be sure, ta be sure!

Onny moor o tha an all giya ma heeead! *nuts the monitor* :*

tilewood
9th Mar 2006, 06:57
Wingswinger: 'you (English) stole the island from us Celts'

Perhaps, but we have sure been paying for it eversince!! :hmm:

PPRuNe Radar
9th Mar 2006, 07:29
acbus1

You're probably French really ;)

Polikarpov
9th Mar 2006, 07:45
I've just sent them a feedback form on that story asking whether the census actually IS racist, or whether it was merely an oversight on the part of the BBC not to include England.

Stockpicker
9th Mar 2006, 07:58
I always state "English - but, acbus, why have you then put your location as "UK"? :E

IB4138
9th Mar 2006, 08:01
I know my great grandfather on my father's side was from Ireland.
Strangely enough there is a Spanish version of my surname, so the theory of that side of my family being from a refugee from the Armarda, landing in Ireland, could be correct.
His wife could trace her ancestory back to having gone to England with William the Conqueror, from France.
My mother's great grandfather was a Ferguson and from Peterhead, so Scottish.
I am therefore confused and a true European!
Is their a suitable box to tick?

One thing I can't claim fortunately is Welsh ancestory!:p

wonder if drapes will fail to notice the French connection? One can live in hope for fear of ridicule!

Curious Pax
9th Mar 2006, 08:13
I claim Viking ancestry! My surname is not very common in the UK, but (usually with a 1 letter variation that doesn't change the sound) seems to be widespread in Denmark. The limited investigations I have done shows that side of the family being in Lincolnshire at least over the 150 years prior to 1950. That of course was a popular landing spot for the gentlemen in horned hats looking to do a bit of pillaging, so coupled with the Denmark fact I'm pretty convinced.

I did have to revise my views slightly after the link to the records of ancestors taking part on the Brit side in the Battle of Trafalgar appeared here, as the only one with my surname was born in Hamburg (though the name isn't particularly Germanic). I know think that the ancestors took more of a land route from home, rather than sailing directly from Denmark. It appears that a wine merchant in Hamburg shares my surname too - will have to drop in and see if there are freebies to be had next time I'm in the area!

My wife is one of those funny Celts (Cornish). Tracing her family tree is both easy (they all lived in the same village for 100s of years) and hard (they seem to have kept marrying each other. Which explains a lot!

acbus1
9th Mar 2006, 08:19
- but, acbus, why have you then put your location as "UK"?
I don't know what you mean! :p :}

Stockpicker
9th Mar 2006, 08:25
Sorted, acbus!

For myself, I was born in England of an English father and Scottish mother, and have lived most of my life in Scotland. I tend to put "British" on forms, but under the Adapted Tebbit test, I cheer for Scotland in the Calcutta Cup!

Polikarpov
9th Mar 2006, 10:49
Ha ha, the BBC have now changed the opening paragraph.

It now reads: "The national Census is to include a national ID question so people can say if they consider themselves English, Welsh, Scottish, Irish or British"

:)

tony draper
9th Mar 2006, 10:55
Ah smoke tabs an sup broon ale am a Geordie me.
:rolleyes:

Rushton
9th Mar 2006, 11:49
Got a surname that came over with them Norman invaders who shot people in the eyes. Had a grandma who's dubious parentage was German, Grandpappy was from one of them Scottie clans that wear tartan skirts, Father was true blue English as I am. Details go on forms as English, born in England, live in England etc. Great Britain just does not exist to me, nor the UK.

Heads down in coming.

Ace Rimmer
9th Mar 2006, 12:42
Hmmm what to put OMR is a Texan with Jockistani refugee and a dash of Cherokee ancestry... SMR is English as as they come (which I suppose means Celtic/Roman/Danish/Germanic/French or something like that).

tall and tasty
9th Mar 2006, 12:46
Whenever a form asks for my nationality, I always state "English".

I always say I am British! :cool: I have such a hotch potch of nationalities in my heritage that I am sure there is some Scottish/Welsh or Irish in me somewhere or has been at sometime in the past.

TnT

Curious Pax
9th Mar 2006, 13:11
I am sure there is some Scottish/Welsh or Irish in me somewhere or has been at sometime in the past.
TnT

Oooeer Missuss:ok:

I know.....hat...coat.....

pzu
9th Mar 2006, 13:14
From a current Office for National Statistics Survey, they have the question as follows:
Q1: What is your nationality?
Options for answer are:
UK British; Irish Republic; Hong Kong; China; Other;
Q2: In which country were you born?
Options for answer are:
England; Wales; Scotland; Northern Island; UK - Britain (don't know country); Republic of Ireland; Hong Kong; Other
Q3: What do you consider your national identity to be. You may choose as many as apply. Is it?
English; Scottish; Welsh; Irish; British; Other
Q4: To which of these etnic groups do you consider you belong?
(At this a show or flash card is produced with the following options)
White; Mixed; Asian or Asian British; Black or Black British; Chinese; Other Ethnic Group:
Dependant on this answer the next question asks which sub-group you consider you belong to
Following on is a question re religion
What is your religion, even if you are not currently practising?
Options are
Christian; Buddhist; Hindu; Jewish; Muslim Sikh; Any other religion; Or no religion at all
For this particular survey, participation is voluntary & confidential, also PASS or its equivalent is an accepted response.

PZU - Out of Africa

acbus1
9th Mar 2006, 13:40
I am sure there is some Scottish/Welsh or Irish in me somewhere or has been at sometime in the past.

Wot....all a once!

I'm impressed. :cool:

None of the above
9th Mar 2006, 14:51
Last year I witnessed a road traffic accident and in the course of giving a witness statement to the plod he announced that the next section was for 'government statistics' and wished to know how I would describe my own ethnicity. In the second or two that elapsed before being given the form, I announced 'White Anglo-Saxon' which caused him to blanche somewhat, due, I suppose, to his being a large Welsh gent. I had to settle on 'British' as the option of ticking the 'English' box wasn't offered. I did think of ticking 'Bargee' but plod wasn't much amused with my first response.

Wingswinger
9th Mar 2006, 17:33
There was a piece on the front page of the Torygraph today about the next census. It seems the cheeky b*st*rds are thinking about asking us to reveal our incomes.

G-CPTN
9th Mar 2006, 17:36
But they already KNOW! That's what the Inland Revenue does . . .

Wingswinger
9th Mar 2006, 17:48
I knew somebody would point that out to me. Perhaps they're hoping to compare the two sets of data and catch some people out. It would also give them a more accurate picture of HOUSEHOLD income - some people have different addresses for tax purposes.

Loose rivets
10th Mar 2006, 03:35
>>>>>>>>>>>>>My surname is not very common in the UK, but (usually with a 1 letter variation that doesn't change the sound) seems to be widespread<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<


Yeeeeeeeeeeees, now I come to think of it, mine's a bit like that. Oh, okay, I'll let on.

It was originally Marsupialdartwraughtphutphutphutburlington-Smythe, but we altered a letter and pronounce it... Woohoo. http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v703/walnaze/woohoo1.gif