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acbus1
5th Mar 2006, 18:07
I've just admonished someone elsewhere for missing a * out of a sentence.

But I'm worried that I should have said an *

What's the official answer?

Please reply soon, before this thread receives the "treatment". :uhoh:

Stockpicker
5th Mar 2006, 18:15
an.

:8



:D

tilewood
5th Mar 2006, 18:18
It depends, and as you don't quote the text is is impossible to say. :hmm:

WestWind1950
5th Mar 2006, 18:32
it depends...

a "star" or an "asterix" ... an before vowels..usually

ok, miss teacher leaves the classroom... :bored:

MagnusP
5th Mar 2006, 18:50
it depends...
a "star" or an "asterix" ... an before vowels..usually
ok, miss teacher leaves the classroom... :bored:
An "a". An "e". An "i". An "o". A "u"?? An hotel?? Dunno. Letters and acronyms are a pain. I work under "Conditions of Employment Memoranda". One is a Conditions of Employment Memorandum, or CEM. What's the abbreviation for the plural, Conditions of Employment Memoranda? Lots of people use CEMs, but I'm not so sure.

I know; no help whatsoever.

WestWind1950
5th Mar 2006, 18:53
an hotel? since when is "h" a vowel :confused: a hotel sounds better.... but, yes, there are exceptions... just can't think of any :8

Maxbert
5th Mar 2006, 18:57
AN Asterisk (NOT Asterix :* ), but why :confused: ?

Rick Storm
5th Mar 2006, 19:00
An: This is called/named the (indefinite article) it can mean... one, some,any and each.

Jerricho
5th Mar 2006, 19:03
"asterix"

http://www.shubhayan.com/favs/cartoonpic/asterix.jpg

Heeee heee........

Richard Spandit
5th Mar 2006, 19:09
an hotel? since when is "h" a vowel :confused: a hotel sounds better.... but, yes, there are exceptions... just can't think of any :8

An hotel is technically correct, even though it sounds wrong. I suppose it should be an holiday, an hat etc. Makes it easier if you speak with a French accent... :)

goldfrog
5th Mar 2006, 19:12
an hotel? since when is "h" a vowel :confused: a hotel sounds better.... but, yes, there are exceptions... just can't think of any :8 The convention is to use "a" before the aspirant "h" (a house, a hostage) and "an" before the silent "h" (an hotel, an hour, an heir, an honour).

MagnusP
5th Mar 2006, 19:15
An hotel is technically correct, even though it sounds wrong. I suppose it should be an holiday, an hat etc. Makes it easier if you speak with a French accent... :)
Thank you, Richard. That's the point I was trying to get across (not too well, I admit). What works in written English doesn't necessarily work so well in the spoken language, especially where pronunciation differs. Is it (spoken) as "a HHHotel" or "an 'otel"? YMMV

Farmer 1
5th Mar 2006, 19:55
Talk Yorkshire - problem solved.

G-CPTN
5th Mar 2006, 21:06
Tawsn't always ever thus. In more poncey times they was 'otels. Nowadays for some plebians it's become Ho-tel, but the rules about haspirants stays hunchanged, so hits an hotel. Ani fule no that.

Onan the Clumsy
6th Mar 2006, 00:16
Asterix =====> http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/5e/Asterix-Asterix.gif (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Asterix-Asterix.gif)


Asterisk =====> *



...and it's "a" hotel :*

Jerricho
6th Mar 2006, 01:58
OI!!! Clumsy!!!

Get yer own joke!!!

sprocket
6th Mar 2006, 02:26
This must be an arseterix then .. http://members.optusnet.com.au/~thesme/mypic124.gif

compressor stall
6th Mar 2006, 03:43
Please, please people:

One asterisk
Two astrices.

Grrrrrrrr :mad:

Jerricho
6th Mar 2006, 06:44
Asterii?????????

ORAC
6th Mar 2006, 07:20
Aster: :}

http://www.eurosam.com/blocks/images/AS30%20V.jpg

G-CPTN
6th Mar 2006, 08:02
Aster Nought?

sprocket
6th Mar 2006, 08:47
Whatever happened to Rick Astley? :8

acbus1
6th Mar 2006, 09:04
Rick Astley? Naught.

panda-k-bear
6th Mar 2006, 10:25
Actually, Onan, it' only "a hotel" if you is uneddicated, 'parently.

Ah, my old English teacher has a lot to answer for.

"An hotel", silent h, is grammatically correct and actually flows more easily when pronounced. To pronounce "a hotel", your sentence comes to a pause between "a" and "hotel", which is, apparently, much frowned upon.

Anyway boys and girls, do carry on. Now I've made myself into a berk as part of the spelling police, that is.

RiskyRossco
6th Mar 2006, 10:42
One has always ventured minor approbation of the Grammar Police/Nazis/Pedants and one is currently studying for the official capacity.
This is not in any way an uber-plot but, instead, serves further purpose in one's ultimate professional pursuit. In fact, one has hoped one has ignored many opportunities to practise, in here. It's not like I 'asterisk it, yer know?

:hmm: :rolleyes: :}

mocoman
6th Mar 2006, 10:44
a/an h???????


an honour/honor...

an honorarium...

The key is the silent 'haitch'

Th-Th-That's All Folks,

ORAC
6th Mar 2006, 11:30
Silent haitches? I believe the Spanish have cornered the market...... ;)

goshdarnit
6th Mar 2006, 11:40
Actually, the Spanish have cornered the market in Silent "P's", as in Swimming Pool.

Devlin Carnet
6th Mar 2006, 11:51
Actually, the word is "Aitch" without a "h"

goshdarnit
6th Mar 2006, 11:56
An "aitch" without an "aitch"?
What do you use instead?, an asterisk / asterix / *? [Or is that a asterisk / asterix / *??!! Doh!]

panda-k-bear
6th Mar 2006, 12:08
No, I'd never use a little anti-Roman Frenchman.

Shall we just call it "star" and avoid upsetting the poor little blighter?

ORAC
6th Mar 2006, 12:10
Is a haitch as good as an aitch? (http://malcolmfarnsworth.com/english/usage/haitch-aitch-burnside.shtml) And, sure, wasn´t I edjumicated by the sisters and the priests.... :O

Although the spirit of our times is generous, forgiving and tolerant, the choice between aitch and haitch can cause a good deal of anxiety and even hostility. Generally speaking, haitch is used by those educated in that part of the Roman Catholic system which traces its origins to Ireland. Aitch is preferred by the rest. Some apostates deny their origins by abandoning haitch; but there is little traffic in the other direction. When I was a child, I was forbidden to say haitch; friends who said haitch were appalled that I ate meat on Fridays......

acbus1
6th Mar 2006, 14:47
Some apostates deny their origins.....
Don't fecking start on apostetes, or we'll be here for ever. :rolleyes:

djk
6th Mar 2006, 14:50
An "a". An "e". An "i". An "o". A "u"?? An hotel?? Dunno. Letters and acronyms are a pain. I work under "Conditions of Employment Memoranda". One is a Conditions of Employment Memorandum, or CEM. What's the abbreviation for the plural, Conditions of Employment Memoranda? Lots of people use CEMs, but I'm not so sure.
I know; no help whatsoever.

I always thought it was a hotel but an 'otel :D

djk
6th Mar 2006, 14:51
Whatever happened to Rick Astley? :8

The P in his name is silent

WestWind1950
6th Mar 2006, 15:16
it depends...
a "star" or an "asterix" ... an before vowels..usually
ok, miss teacher leaves the classroom... :bored:
:{ that's what I get for posting when tired... of course asterisk is the proper word.... but at least it provided some fun discussion :E
but I still insist.... "a" hotel, "an" only before vowels... but then I pronounce the "h" :p

(now where's that old grammar book.... never there when ya need it..)

G-CPTN
6th Mar 2006, 15:36
So who's suggesting hasterick?
An hasterick.

goshdarnit
6th Mar 2006, 15:38
Wasn't that a novel by Dostoyevesky?

HowlingWind
7th Mar 2006, 01:58
This is definitely an historic occasion... :8

MagnusP
7th Mar 2006, 09:12
Re: Rick Astley -
The P in his name is silent
I wish he was.

BoeingMEL
9th Mar 2006, 11:32
definitely AN 'otel because the word was nicked from the Spanish...actually!

I'll go then shall I? BM

panda-k-bear
9th Mar 2006, 12:49
Maybe we're all wrong. Perhaps it's "a notel"? :)