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tony draper
4th Mar 2006, 21:01
We've had fav movies fav music fav comedy ect,one thinks its time one raised the tone of the place.
Prooner's favourite Paintings,you are allowed only three and perhaps because of bandwidth twould be best to just post links, lord knows just about every painting ever done by the hand of man is out there somewhere on't interweb thingy.

Heres mine.

http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://www.excelsiordirect.com/images/temerair.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.excelsiordirect.com/temerair.htm&h=350&w=447&sz=38&tbnid=VMZsGD259avzzM:&tbnh=97&tbnw=124&hl=en&start=1&prev=/images%3Fq%3DThe%2BFighting%2BTEMERAIR%26svnum%3D10%26hl%3De n%26lr%3D%26client%3Dfirefox-a%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:en-US:official_s%26sa%3DG


http://www.masterpiece-paintings-gallery.com/friedrich-abbey-os.htm

http://www.punkycorner.it/arte/escher/09.jpg

Onan the Clumsy
4th Mar 2006, 21:04
I like the paintnig on my front door, but I didn't like doing it.

G-CPTN
4th Mar 2006, 21:06
Mrs G-CPTN says hers is one done by our kids. Can't find it anywhere on'tinternet . . . :{

Was disappointed by Mona Lisa. Good job we didn't queue, but entered the Louvre by the back door. Our tour guide knew how to get there and back on the coach within three minutes. If it's Saturday it must have been Paris . . .

Stockpicker
4th Mar 2006, 21:37
Wow, this is a tough one Drapes! The one that first springs to mind is this:

http://www.masterpiece-paintings-gallery.com/canaletto-regatta-1733.htm

but I'll prolly have to come back and add others in due course.

seacue
4th Mar 2006, 21:58
My favourite is by Winslow Homer:
http://www.globalgallery.com/prod_images/ny-833.jpg

and then some Turners like
http://www.j-m-w-turner.co.uk/artist/gifetc/tameria.jpg
and
http://www.j-m-w-turner.co.uk/artist/gifetc/turner-st.jpg

and a bunch of the impressionists.

Three is too few.

Howard Hughes
4th Mar 2006, 22:12
Well Drapes, being an Aussie I think it's impossible to have culture without beer.....;) So my submission is the great Melburnian icon, Chloe.:ok:
http://www.australianbeers.com/pubs/chloe/chloe.htm

G-CPTN
4th Mar 2006, 22:32
Au contraire, mon ami, one cannot have beer without CULTURE.

And isn't Australian culture an oxymoron (or am I the moron?)?

RiskyRossco
4th Mar 2006, 22:56
Ah, tis better t'have culture than be a culchie. :hmm:

Have a photy in t'albums of http://cgfa.sunsite.dk/gericaul/p-gerica11.htm

Manet's colours,

http://sunsite.sut.ac.jp/wm/paint/auth/monet/waterlilies/monet.wl-green.jpg

And so many more. ..

RaraAvis
4th Mar 2006, 23:45
Impossible task this is, mr.Draper.. The first few to come to mind

http://www.abcgallery.com/D/degas/degas24.html
http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/courbet/wave.jpg
http://www.abcgallery.com/M/matisse/matisse146.html
http://www.mystudios.com/masters/klimt-the-kiss-1907.jpg

Goya's caprichos, of course, can't pick one, they all tell a story
http://cgfa.sunsite.dk/goya/caprichos/index.html

broadreach
5th Mar 2006, 00:32
Impossible request Drapes. Favourites list an arm long. But one you might appreciate is "Off Valparaiso" ...

http://www.tate.org.uk/servlet/ViewWork?cgroupid=999999977&workid=13638&searchid=9337&tabview=image

Where Somerscales manages to make you really feel the swell and worry about how the ship and the boat are going to make contact.

Then there's the other seascape painting I first saw attached to a caption stolen from Cunard, "Getting there is Half the Fun!"...

http://www.artchive.com/artchive/G/gericault/raft_of_the_medusa.jpg.html

BlueDiamond
5th Mar 2006, 01:46
And isn't Australian culture an oxymoron ...
Culture, G-CPTN? Of course we have culture in Oz. Here ...


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v511/BlueDiamond01/Yoghurt.jpg

:E :E :E

One shall have to think carefully about this, Mr. Draper, narrowing the choices to three could be difficult.

Loose rivets
5th Mar 2006, 03:59
A great thread Mr Drapes!!!:ok:

Without a doubt, for me, The Ambassadors.

http://phs.prs.k12.nj.us/~ewood/virtualmuseum/Ambassadors/Ambassadors.html

I watched, (a T/V series) with baited breath, as restoration work was done, sometimes with a single bristle brush.

It was the subject of the 1,000,000 question on Cris Tarrant's 'Millionaire' prog. It was the one that was not broadcast cos of the fraud. I could have got that one right!!!:8

I was talking the other day with my grandson, trying to explain about Canaletto being an architect as well as a painter. Truly my kind of work...anything with intense detail.

I like Constable, because his work is near to home, and the mill and lock are where we spent the two summers before last. It's odd that the church seems to get moved to be in pics that it has no right to be in.

acbus1
5th Mar 2006, 05:30
Not much point posting mine.

The mods would only delete them. :(

Still, I think it's art and that's all that matters. :E

Solid Rust Twotter
5th Mar 2006, 06:47
There's a painting of HMS Erebus and HMS Terror heeled over and beating downwind at speed with icebergs low on the horizon in the background. It hangs in the saloon of the SA Agulhas and one covets it with a sore heart.

Another painting of unknown name is of the Battle of Trafalgar and shows both fleets in action with plenty of shot and shell flying around amid the flames and smoke. Brilliant!

Dogs playing poker...

http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d132/Lardbeast/DogsPlayingPoker.jpg

lexxity
5th Mar 2006, 09:08
ARGH! How difficult, I have many favourites, here are some of them:

Nightwatch (http://www.rijksmuseum.nl/images/aria/sk/z/sk-c-5.z)

The Singing Butler (https://secure.westend-gallery.co.uk/weg-catalogue/item/show.do;jsessionid=416C5D8DDD9FFEF8F31F33BFE4FAE17D?productI d=60)

Garden at Giverny (http://www.artpassions.net/gardens/giverny.html)

MagnusP
5th Mar 2006, 10:23
Canaletto, St Mark's Square, Venice
Henry Raeburn, Sir Walter Scott
Van Gogh, Olive Trees.

But it'll be different tomorrow. :)

jade04
5th Mar 2006, 11:15
Two of my all time favourite artists are Roy Lichtenstein (http://www.tate.org.uk/servlet/ViewWork?cgroupid=999999961&workid=8782) and Kandinsky (http://www.tate.org.uk/servlet/ViewWork?cgroupid=999999961&workid=8782)
Another would be Pam Carter (http://www.pamcarter.com/) as she taught me years ago at art school.

Plus many many more.

tall and tasty
5th Mar 2006, 11:16
For me my fav painters have to be

Degas - any of his ballet subjects
Monet - mainly his garden but love his characters (fav water lilies)
and Turner's landscapes, but love Stubbs, any of the impressionists with alot of the religious depictions and the pre-raphilite period.

Only three I could not choose my fav three, but three galleries that would be so much easier.:p

TnT

Ps to keep in on aviation I loved the paintings on the side of the Bratheans a/c particularly at Christmas

Loose rivets
5th Mar 2006, 18:59
[QUOTE=lexxity]ARGH! How difficult, I have many favourites, here are some of them:
The Singing Butler (https://secure.westend-gallery.co.uk/weg-catalogue/item/show.do;jsessionid=416C5D8DDD9FFEF8F31F33BFE4FAE17D?productI d=60)

This very telling picture produced a quite extraordinary pair of reactions in me.

They are quite obviously based on my previous lives. I have always thought that I should be living in a mansion, being waited on hand an foot by lesser mortals...but strangely, I have always felt a deep anger at the type of people that would use servants as umbrella holders or bath pourers.

Leading up to the war, the elite classes could still use their fellow beings as virtual slaves, while they sipped on the last of the good champagne.

This simple picture has a lot to say. Amazing, the power of good art, innit?

Loose rivets
5th Mar 2006, 19:00
ARGH! How difficult, I have many favourites, here are some of them:
The Singing Butler (https://secure.westend-gallery.co.uk/weg-catalogue/item/show.do;jsessionid=416C5D8DDD9FFEF8F31F33BFE4FAE17D?productI d=60)

This very telling picture produced a quite extraordinary pair of reactions in me.
They are quite obviously based on my previous lives. I have always thought that I should be living in a mansion, being waited on hand an foot by lesser mortals...but strangely, I have always felt a deep anger at the type of people that would use servants as umbrella holders or bath pourers.
Leading up to the war, the elite classes could still use their fellow beings as virtual slaves, while they sipped on the last of the good champagne.
This simple picture has a lot to say. Amazing, the power of good art, innit?

con-pilot
5th Mar 2006, 19:13
My favorite painting by my most favorite painter.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir.

http://www.van-gogh-on-canvas.com/images/renoir-luncheon.jpg?renoir_pierre-auguste.html

G-CPTN
5th Mar 2006, 20:43
How strange! We dined at that very table on the eve of son's wedding in June 2004.

http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c19/GroupCaptain/23.jpg

http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/renoir/land/dejeuner-canotiers/renoir.dejeuner-canotiers.jpg

Renoir travailla au "Déjeuner des Canotiers", d'avril à juillet 1881.
Il a réuni, sur la terrasse de l'Auberge du Père Fournaise, tous ses amis et modèles pour participer à cette grande oeuvre.
La toile mesure 130 x 173 cm.
Au premier plan, à gauche, Aline joue avec son petit chien. Derrière elle se tient Alphonse Founaise, le propriétaire de l'auberge. Accoudée à la rambarde, Alphonsine Fournaise, sa fille, écoute le Baron Raoul Barbier assis dos tourné.
Au premier plan, à droite, se trouve le peintre Gustave Caillebotte assis à califourchon sur une chaise qui écoute discrètement l'actrice Ellen Andrée tandis que le journaliste italien Maggiolo se penche sur elle.
Derrière eux, le petit groupe est formé du journaliste Paul Lhote avec un pince-nez, d'Eugène-Pierre Lestringuez et de l'actrice Jeanne Samary.
Au centre, le modèle Angèle boit assise à côté d'un homme dont on aperçoit juste le profil. Derrière elle se tient le financier Ephrussi en chapeau haut de forme. En arrière plan, au travers des saules miroite la seine sur laquelle passent des voiliers.
L'ambiance est heureuse et sereine. Pourtant, Renoir dont la situation financière de l'époque n'était pas brillante, ne savait pas, lorsqu'il commença cette oeuvre majeure, s'il pourrait la terminer.

Translation by BabelFish

Renoir worked with the "Lunch of the Rowers", from April to July 1881.
It joined together, on the terrace of the Inn of the Father Fournaise, all his friends and models to take part in this great work.
The fabric measures 130 X 173 cm.
In the foreground, on the left, Aline plays with her puppy. Behind it Alphonse Founaise, the owner of the inn is held. Accoudée in rambarde, Alphonsine Furnace, his daughter, listens to the Baron Raoul seated Barbier with turned back.
In the foreground, on the right, the painter Gustave Caillebotte is sitting astride a chair and listens to the actress Ellen Andrée discreetly while the Italian journalist Maggiolo leans on it.
Behind them, the small group is formed of the journalist Paul Lhote with a pince-nez, of Eugene-Pierre Lestringuez and the actress Jeanne Samary.
In the center, the Angèle model drinks sitted beside a man which one sees just the profile. Behind it is held the Ephrussi financier in a top hat. Behind, through willows the Seine gleams on which pass the sailing ships.
The environment is happy and serene. However, Renoir whose financial standing of the time was not brilliant, did not know, when he began this major work, if he could finish it.

Keef
5th Mar 2006, 22:59
I drool over most impressionist paintings, and quite a few others - even some of the "ordinary" ones I've got on the walls here. BUT...
Years ago M and I went for a wander round the Fitzwilliam in Cambridge, it being a soggy day and me not having an umbrella at the time. Wandering aimlessly, we turned a corner and saw this (http://www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/opac/catalogue_detail.php?&priref=2930&_function_=xslt&_limit_=100#1).
Fair took my breath away.

tony draper
5th Mar 2006, 23:09
Quite a while back I posted some drawings I had found somewhere on the web on one of the TRABBY threads along with suitable funny captions I made up,they were Mytholgy or Religious based subjects, I cannot find them now, but they were strangely dark grim and compelling.
:uhoh:

RiskyRossco
6th Mar 2006, 01:32
Only for those of a suitably dour medieval religious fatalism, Herr FSL.
;) Rather fanciful of the artists if I do say so.

con-pilot, cheers! :ok: For the life of me I couldn't remember the artist but that's one of my favourites. Quaintly reminiscent of more than a few occasions spent in company through several countries and auberges where there gathered fellow travellers from far-flung places.

A main mission yet to be realised is a call into Bob Jones Uni, S.C., and their awesome art gallery.