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View Full Version : First glimpse of New Moon


Grainger
28th Feb 2006, 16:10
OK, sunset tonight is the best chance this year to glimpse a less-than-day-old Moon. Right now the New Moon is just 17 hours old . . . I'm off to see if I can spot it (about 6 degrees south of Mercury).

Anyone in the Eastern States will have a better chance five or six hours from now . . .

If anyone does spot it, please post here !

Krystal n chips
28th Feb 2006, 16:16
[QUOTE=Grainger]OK, sunset tonight is the best chance this year to glimpse a less-than-day-old Moon. Right now the New Moon is just 17 hours old . . . QUOTE]

Awwww Bless it :p Erm, has it got a name yet and do we know if it's a boy or a girl moon ? ;) :D

Kalium Chloride
28th Feb 2006, 16:25
Erm, has it got a name yet?



How about 'Gary New Moon' ?

'Here in my car...I'm the safest of all..."


OK, OK, I'm going

Capn Notarious
28th Feb 2006, 16:42
Ah the dearly departed Keith; what a fine drummer he was. Cremated at Golders Green. I should have liked to have seen and heard The Who, in that line up.

colmac747
28th Feb 2006, 16:56
Baby Moon:ugh:

acbus1
28th Feb 2006, 17:09
Right now the New Moon is just 17 hours old . . .


Tony Blair idea, is it? "And I pledge to you all, gathered here today, on this momentous occasion, that New Moon is only 17 hours old."

Only a small fib, then, by his standards.


At least even he can't put spin on it. :E

frostbite
28th Feb 2006, 17:09
Everyone outside mooning?

Jerricho
28th Feb 2006, 17:09
http://www.wiseacre-gardens.com/gnome/image/mooning.jpg

Grainger
28th Feb 2006, 22:23
Pah ! Froze my nuts off* and didn't see a thing. Well, Mercury - but not a trace of the Moon.

Oh well, tomorrow night . . .

* No, Jerr - not those nuts :eek:

tony draper
28th Feb 2006, 23:21
Spotting Mercury will be the trick,been into astronomy for 40 years and I have seen Mercury only once naked eye,drivng down the AI just before sun up,I mean I was, Mercury weren't
:rolleyes:

Lafyar Cokov
1st Mar 2006, 07:51
Sophie Moon perhaps?????

Windy Militant
1st Mar 2006, 10:42
Slight Thread slip, but did anybody see the return to the moon Clangers episode on Moon Night on BBC 4 on sunday. Cracking stuff!:ok:
By the way don't forget that it's considered to be bad luck to see a new moon for the first time through Glass. I wonder why that came about? :confused:

Grainger
1st Mar 2006, 16:57
Hooray !

OK - we're 24 hours later, but it's there right now - still a very thin sliver. If it's clear where you are, go out and take a look.

colmac747
1st Mar 2006, 17:28
http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b330/Dxer/PICT0053.jpg

Here it is. Awwwww:\

One's hand was a little shaky with lack of alcohol.

G-CPTN
1st Mar 2006, 17:33
It's stuck in our ash tree. It's Wednesday. Ash Wednesday. Figures!

AerBabe
1st Mar 2006, 17:54
I accidentally saw the new moon this evening, while looking at the traffic jams on the M11.

colmac747
1st Mar 2006, 18:07
My little digi cam is crap (as can be seen above!), but really is quite spectacular. You can see the dark side too..oooooooh The Dark Side of The Moon:ugh:

vapilot2004
1st Mar 2006, 18:25
Spotting Mercury will be the trick,been into astronomy for 40 years and I have seen Mercury only once naked eye,drivng down the AI just before sun up,I mean I was, Mercury weren't
:rolleyes:

Well my timing's not very good but have a read here on Mercury's current visibility status:

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2006/21feb_mercury.htm?list757758


New Moon on Monday XXXXX make that Tuesday then.:}

Grainger
1st Mar 2006, 19:13
Nice one Colmac !

Here's a slightly steadier view, hot off the press.

http://www.stirlingastronomicalsociety.org.uk/images/alan/moonmar1.jpg

Lon More
1st Mar 2006, 19:28
Nice clear evening here, could see about 3/4 of the circumference

colmac747
1st Mar 2006, 20:47
That's a stunning image Grainger!

tony draper
1st Mar 2006, 21:51
Yer cheated Mr G,with a image that size yer used a telephoto and a tripod,good shot though, the new moon is a difficult subject the earthlight tends to make life difficult,one can get the Cresent but not the earthlight, or get the earthlight and overexpose the cresent.
:rolleyes:

G-CPTN
1st Mar 2006, 23:55
http://www.stirlingastronomicalsociety.org.uk/images/alan/moonmar1.jpg
Is that a professional job?


I found that using a long-focus/telephoto lens for moon-shots increases the intensity across the 'film' more than reduction due to a smaller maximum aperture (ie 400mm f5.6 versus 50mm f1.8) and obviated the need for reciprocity failure correction. Don't suppose it matters with digital though? I've also got a 1000mm f10 (for 35mm).

Keef
2nd Mar 2006, 01:30
I got a brilliant view of the new moon this evening as I went into Church (right at the top of the hill). I didn't have a camera, but wished I had. Had I taken one, it would of course have been overcast.

Like Mr Draper, I hoped to see Mercury too (for the first time wtih the naked eye), but the brilliant light near the horizon turned out to be a 737 going to Stansted.

Grainger
2nd Mar 2006, 08:05
Thanks guys ! Digital camera through the eyepiece of a small telescope in my back garden.

Check out the Moonphase project (http://www.stirlingastronomicalsociety.org.uk/moonphase%20project/moonphase.html) on the same site if you want to see some more shots.

had to get up quite early in the morning for some of those, I can tell you !

Oh - and here's an earthshine shot for Drapes:

http://www.stirlingastronomicalsociety.org.uk/images/alan/earthshine.jpg