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tony draper
26th Feb 2006, 21:05
Start of a exceedingly interesting documentry series on BBC4 tonight on the nature of time,tonight was mostly concered with how we as humans percieve same inour everyday life,found it a bit odd that the phenomenon or the perception of time speeding up as one gets older was not explored,hmmm never mind perhaps next week
Always thought Time to be a facinating subject,any prooner thoughts on same,before one begins ones lecture?
:rolleyes:

arcniz
26th Feb 2006, 21:12
Saving the best for last?

ex_matelot
26th Feb 2006, 21:13
My head tends to fall off when dwelling too much on this subject.Have read Bill Brysons book which dabbles on 'time'.

Apparently NASA are/were trying to disprove Einsteins' theory...dunno what the result was though.

If time travel was possible,how come we have not been visited from the future yet??..As Hawkings says.

My personal thought is that the person who discovers a way to manipulate time would become closest to being Godlike than mankind could ever be and would keep the secret and rule etc etc...I know I would!

BALIX
26th Feb 2006, 21:17
Time is an illusion.

Teatime doubly so.

copyright Ford Prefect

Jerricho
26th Feb 2006, 21:23
You've touched on an interesting topic there Tones.

Why is the last half hour of a night shift lasts forever?

Yet when I make love, it's over in an matter of seconds............Umm disregard, I think I can answer that one.

Buster Hyman
26th Feb 2006, 21:26
Jerricho Next time you're making love, try and ask someone else to be there to put the stopwatch on. You may be being too hard on yourself.

As for Time, I think Pratchett's written a book on the subject, I'll have to look it up before I can make an educated comment!

Loki
26th Feb 2006, 21:29
I have either always thought, or I read somewhere (more likely) that time is what stops everything happening at once.

G-CPTN
26th Feb 2006, 21:36
Time, like an ever Rolling Stone.
So it's still going, but getting to be of pensionable age.

Of course we've never been visited by anyone from the future, because it hasn't happened yet! The past, however is another matter altogether. There's lots of past about, but they weren't clever enough in the olden days to effect time travel. Stands to reason dunnit?

tall and tasty
26th Feb 2006, 21:39
Always thought Time to be a facinating subject,any prooner thoughts on same,before one begins ones lecture?
It facinates me and the one thing I ask myself constantly is "why when I promise I will only pprune for just a moment, that moment in time seems endless and then I look and it has been anything up to 8 hours of the day!!!" :p

Worth it but I would love to know why time speeds up as an adult and when you are little it goes at a snail space. Maybe the way the brain is developing as you grow?

TnT

steinycans
26th Feb 2006, 21:41
Fellows, the answer is rather simple. I am not sure of the name of the principal but it has something to do with a unit of time having different percentage values of your entire humen experience. One week when you are a year old is a whole 1/52nd of your 'grand total human experience' wheras, if you make it to 50 years old, it is [5, two, carry the one... ] 1/2600 of your experience, a flash in the pan.

ps: on a semi-related matter, you might want to book an appointment to see your computer technition for a solution to The 2038 bug (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2038_problem)

Jerricho
26th Feb 2006, 21:45
Hey, I like that Steiny! That's very good.

Please don't be insulted by this, but is that genuine Steiny logic or did you read it somewhere. Cause if genuine, give yourself a huge pat on the back (give yerself a pat anyway :ok: )

G-CPTN
26th Feb 2006, 21:50
The revolutionary French established the Republican Calendar on November 24, 1793, including decimal time of day. The day was divided into 10 decimal hours, each divided into 100 decimal minutes of 100 decimal seconds each, and 10 days made a decimal week, or "décade". Clocks were constructed with decimal faces, most of them displaying times in both systems. The hours were numbered 1 to 10, with 10 representing midnight local apparent time. Days of the week were also numbered 1 to 10. However, Revolutionary Time was officially abandoned on April 7, 1795, after only 18 months, although the Republican Calendar, with its the ten-day weeks, survived until the 1805, when it was repealed by Emperor Napoleon.

French decimal time was first declared by the decree of October 5, 1793, which was modified by the addition of the underlined words in the decree of November 24, 1793:

VIII. Chaque mois est divisé en trois parties égales de dix jours chacune, et qui sont appelées décades...
XI. Le jour, de minuit à minuit, est divisé en dix parties ou heures, chaque partie en dix autres, ainsi de suite jusqu’à la plus petite portion measurable de la durée. La centième partie de l'heure est appelée minute décimale; la centième partie de la minute est appelée seconde décimale.

Which translates into English as:

VIII. Each month is divided into three equal parts, of ten days each, which are called decades...
XI. The day, from midnight to midnight, is divided into ten parts or hours, each part into ten others, so on until the smallest measurable portion of the interval. The hundredth part of the hour is called decimal minute; the hundredth part of the minute is called decimal second.

Thus, French decimal time was originally defined simply as a decimal fraction of the day, which was later modified with the definitions of decimal time units (decimal hours, minutes and seconds) to match the hands of clocks.

The French made another attempt at the decimalization of time in 1897, when the Commission de décimalisation du temps was created by the Bureau of Longitude, with the mathematician Henri Poincaré as secretary. The proposed unit of time was the standard hour of 1/24 day, divided into 100 minutes, and each minute into 100 seconds. However, this effort failed to gain any acceptance.

If they hadn't screwed it up we could be fully decimalised by now!

tony draper
26th Feb 2006, 21:56
Delete that post this instant Mr G-CPTN, lest some fecker in EU headquarters sees it.
:uhoh:

seacue
26th Feb 2006, 23:12
Fellows, the answer is rather simple. I am not sure of the name of the principal but it has something to do with a unit of time having different percentage values of your entire humen experience.
I thought that was so obvious that I hadn't bothered to post it.

The SSK
27th Feb 2006, 00:38
They had some nice names for their months, those revolutionary Froggies, Germinal, Fructidor, Brumaire and so on.

RiskyRossco
27th Feb 2006, 01:52
Time, like age, is relative.

The standard second is calculated on the wavelength of some element beginning with C. Cadmium? Californium?
Trust the Spams to have some sorta franchise on time :hmm:

SoundBarrier
27th Feb 2006, 02:24
However, Revolutionary Time was officially abandoned on April 7, 1795, after only 18 months, although the Republican Calendar, with its the ten-day weeks, survived until the 1805, when it was repealed by Emperor Napoleon.


was that erm, 18 months as in :-
18 months * 4(weeks per month) = 72 weeks
72 weeks * 10 Days = 720 days
720 days * 10 hours = 7200 Hours

Because that would mean that we lost time!

72 weeks * 7 days = 504 days
504 days * 24 hours = 12096 Hours

Edited to add :- "That's like 204 days man!"

So when all this happened, did our ancestors become strangely younger?

And finally, with all this messing around with time, how do we know for sure that we have not lost a year or two in this mess, I mean, I could be younger than I think I am, and so could you!

I think we need an inquisition.

Draper - Blame the French man, Blame the French. This is all their fault. If we find our the anomalies we will have to re-write history won't we?

RiskyRossco
27th Feb 2006, 03:42
Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition!

MrFire
27th Feb 2006, 04:11
Time, like age, is relative.

The standard second is calculated on the wavelength of some element beginning with C. Cadmium? Californium?
Trust the Spams to have some sorta franchise on time :hmm:

innit some sort of unstable particulate what emits a ***tron every second or summat?:confused:

Loose rivets
27th Feb 2006, 06:08
Jerricho Next time you're making love, try and ask someone else to be there to put the stopwatch on. You may be being too hard on yourself.

Did you mean to say that:}

I've sussed this time v age thingie. The fekkin bin men do come every day...they're conspiring agin me.

Really, it goes something like this. Time is a perfectly elastic conveyor belt.( he he, got that one in. ) As we age, the bit we're on streatches more than the newer bit...and so on till the youngsers are getting on their bit for the first time. They are born on that scale, but straightway start to experience the stretching. Okay so far? So, why don't they notice right away? Cos they're all preoccupied with SEX that's why...lucky little sods.:D

Go on Mr Drapes...I'm all ears. (my daddy was a wheat sheaf)

BlueWolf
27th Feb 2006, 06:31
Nyet comrades, the second is as inherent a part of the earth and her sacred geometry as the inch and the degree.

As the nautical mile is one minute of arc at the equator at sea level, so the second is the time taken for the earth to rotate through one sixtieth of that distance.

The vibrations of atomic clocks come very, very, very close to matching that rhythm, but they don't quite make it. So we have adjustments every so often.

It's a bit like pi being an inexact value, but one which is exact enough for our human and earthly purposes; to the degree that we even use it (amongst other things) to validate some of the the "laws" of physics, which also remain exact enough within our human and earthly experience that we proclaim them as truth ;)

Buster Hyman
27th Feb 2006, 07:41
Absolutely! No one should be alone during sex...even Mr. J. :E :ouch:

ORAC
27th Feb 2006, 07:45
Personally, I blame the Sumerians....

Avtrician
27th Feb 2006, 07:56
Jesus, what a thought, Decimal time:ooh: :ooh: :yuk:
I work a nine hr day. so that only leaves an hour to get home, eat, Pprune and sleep:eek: :eek: :\ :confused: :confused: :{
Dont like that Idea at all. Lets nuke the french with an imperiial bomb;) :D

acbus1
27th Feb 2006, 08:20
Time is potentially a fascinating subject. I was really looking forward to the programme.

However, last night's documentary proved that it's possible to make time slow down to a virtual standstill. It was dreary! :*

Lets just hope it gets better as the series progresses. I fear it may be yet another documentary, as are 99% of documentaries these days, tailored to suit those who possess the attention span of a goldfish.

BALIX
27th Feb 2006, 08:47
Apparently, a cesium atom vibrates 209,091,200,500,000,000 per second. It must get very dizzy.

Alas, Blue Wolf, atomic time, based on the above figure, replaced Earth time as the world's official time standard in 1972. So the reason we have ajustments is because the earth is less reliable than our friendly cesium atom and not the other way round.

BlueWolf
27th Feb 2006, 09:16
Well I still say the original second was around before the first atomic clock, even if the cesium atom had already been invented. Anyway, if I'd been vibrating at 209,091,200,500,000,000 times a second since 1972, I'd be a little tired, and prone to the odd lapse requiring adjustment. So there. :* :p

tony draper
27th Feb 2006, 09:36
Of course it was, yer time is based on the divisions of a circle, arc seconds,minutes of arc, degrees and such,15 degrees = 1 hour (err I think)not supprising as our orbit around the sun is circular (I know! I know! it's actually a elipse).
:rolleyes:

Cameronian
27th Feb 2006, 11:55
Blue Wolf, I think your maths is a bit suspect. On the basis of your position that the earth revolves one sixtieth of a minute of arc (one second of arc?) in one second, then the earth would take 60x60x360 seconds = 1,296,000 seconds to complete one daily rotation. There are only 60x60x24 = 86,400 seconds in a day. Your version would require a "day" to be 15 days long.

BALIX
27th Feb 2006, 11:59
Of course, the 360 degrees in a circle is down to the fact that it takes about 360 days for the Earth to orbit the sun. I seem to remember learing about radians during my A level maths several hundred years ago. I think that mathematically speaking they are a better way of dividing up a circle. Perhaps someone who actually gives a shit could explain. Maybe we should adopt a metric system of measuring angles...

Anyway, time dilates as you speed up and it all gets very confusing. If your cesium atom is travelling at 99% the speed of light it would still vibrate at 209,091,200,500,000,000 per second but by the time it gets back to you it will have vibrated far fewer times than its stationary siblings.

I wonder when cesium atoms were invented, though. Probably a few seconds after the big bang. But if there were no cesium atoms about in those first few seconds, how could you measure it :confused: :confused:

I must go for a lie down :sad:

tony draper
27th Feb 2006, 12:27
Err don't think there is such a thing as a arc hour Mr Cameronian,,60 seconds of arc = one minute arc,,the hour is not used, err I think,
Hmmm,but in Astronomy Right Ascension does however use hours,in Astronomy the position of stars planets ect is given in Hours Minutes and Seconds Right Ascension and degrees plus or minus degrees declination from the celestial Equator,****! one used to know all this stuff at one time, now my head hurts as well ,wheres Mr Slasher when yer need him.
:(

patdavies
27th Feb 2006, 12:29
Time, like age, is relative.
The standard second is calculated on the wavelength of some element beginning with C. Cadmium? Californium?
Trust the Spams to have some sorta franchise on time :hmm:

Caesium, I believe

Jerricho
27th Feb 2006, 15:25
Does Avy Scott know how to use a stopwatch?

Cameronian
27th Feb 2006, 16:44
Did I mention an arc hour, Señor Draper? You've got me all wrong - mind you, you're not the first and surely won't be the last!

simon brown
27th Feb 2006, 17:32
Apart from starting 5 mins late I found it V interesting

Grainger
27th Feb 2006, 17:52
Ticking away the moments that make up a dull day
You fritter and waste the hours in an offhand way
Kicking around on a piece of ground in your home town
Waiting for someone or something to show you the way

Tired of lying in the sunshine staying home to watch the rain
And you are young and life is long and there is time to kill today
And then one day you find ten years have got behind you
No one told you when to run, you missed the starting gun

And you run and you run to catch up with the sun, but it's sinking
Racing around to come up behind you again
The sun is the same in a relative way, but you're older
Shorter of breath and one day closer to death

Every year is getting shorter, never seem to find the time
Plans that either come to naught or half a page of scribbled lines
Hanging on in a quiet desperation is the English way
The time is gone, the song is over, thought I'd something more to say

Whirlygig
27th Feb 2006, 18:01
Showing yer age there Grainger ;)

Cheers

Whirls!

Time is an illusion, lunchtime doubly so!

BALIX
27th Feb 2006, 18:53
Time is an illusion, lunchtime doubly so!

Oi!! I've already said that. :ugh:

Well, I said teatime, actually

acbus1
27th Feb 2006, 18:58
Stop making a meal of it! :*


;)

Onan the Clumsy
27th Feb 2006, 19:06
See I told you I could!

flowman
27th Feb 2006, 19:07
Strange nobody seems to know what it is but I get a thousand phonecalls a day asking for some of it back, as if I'VE got it :hmm:
Well whatever time is it surely has to be the most precious commodity of all.
If only I could find a way of flogging it....
Legally!
Jerricho, I have the solution to your problem- make love at the end of a night shift!:ok:

Onan the Clumsy
27th Feb 2006, 19:10
Actually I can travel back in time.

To prove it, I'll go back in time and make a post earlier in this thread.

Loose rivets
27th Feb 2006, 20:16
Time is relative......but then, so are aunties. :bored:

Buster Hyman
27th Feb 2006, 21:02
Oh yeah! Well, if you're so clever Onan, tell me what last weeks lotto numbers were...

con-pilot
27th Feb 2006, 21:04
The hell with last week's numbers, I want to know NEXT week's lottery numbers.:}

jimgriff
27th Feb 2006, 23:04
Did you know that a MOMENT is almost three minutes in length?:8

airship
27th Feb 2006, 23:09
Only if you're willing to devote the rest of your life to the dark side c-p... :}

con-pilot
27th Feb 2006, 23:11
Dark? Like in a bar, okay I'll go for that.:p

G-CPTN
27th Feb 2006, 23:26
Did you know that a MOMENT is almost three minutes in length?:8


But how long is 'just a minute'?

tony draper
27th Feb 2006, 23:33
A hell of a lot longer than, Just a Jiffy.:cool:

Jiffy
A formal definition of the jiffy as a light centimeter (roughly equal to 33.3564 picoseconds)

airship
27th Feb 2006, 23:40
You leave c-p alone now Onan! He might be a heavy-breather, but he be my bro...OK?! ;)

goshdarnit
27th Feb 2006, 23:53
shoot, I left my watch..does anyone know what time it is?

RiskyRossco
28th Feb 2006, 00:15
'Tis why Bistromatics never caught on. The lunch hour is a distortion of the space-time-matter continuum.

Ta, patdavies. ;) I should've remembered that.

Blacksheep
28th Feb 2006, 02:44
A formal definition of the jiffy as a light centimeter (roughly equal to 33.3564 picoseconds)Relative to what? :confused:

henry crun
28th Feb 2006, 03:31
G-CPTN: the answer to your question in the case of the ex Mrs Crun is about 2 hours.

Arm out the window
28th Feb 2006, 03:33
My theory, ahem:
The apparent speeding-up of time as one gets older is merely a psychological thing, related to the number of demands on you at any particular period of your life.

eg - as a whippersnapper, your job is to run around getting into mischief and get Mum and Dad to do everything for you. No worries, 'you are young and life is long, and there is time to kill today' (thankyou Pink Floyd, that's enough now)

Growing up - got to get jobs, move out, learn to do all those things your parents used to do for you - oh no ... not so much time to p155 around any more!

House, spouse and kids ... I need say no more ... never a spare moment

Then, when you're old, grey and/or bald and wrinkled, the kids have gone, you don't work any more, the seemingly amazing expansion of time occurs again, similarly to when you were a young'un, except now you sleep through half of it and it takes you four times as long to do anything, so the effect is somewhat lessened.

So all this talk of tachyons and neutrinos is all a pack of roobbish, your honour.

Avtrician
28th Feb 2006, 07:40
MMmmm Neutrinos on Toast and a cup of fresh Tachyon juice.

I dont have time for this nonsense:E

ORAC
28th Feb 2006, 08:00
Were you aware the corresponding slow particle to match the tachyon is called the tardyon? Honest to god..... :}

Bern Oulli
28th Feb 2006, 09:14
Orac, [pedant mode] Were you aware the corresponding slow particle to match the tachyon is called the tardyon?
I think you meant complement rather than match. A tardyon by definition could never match a tachyon.
[/pedant mode]

Civis
28th Feb 2006, 18:54
Mr. Arm
Your theory sounds about right. :ok:

One has been deeply hurt by referring to tachyons as roobish:{ :{
Have a heart kind sir. Do you appreciate how few places in the world one may even use the term, much less engage in discourse, puns, anything
related without sanity being suspect?

Don't know where I stumbled onto the following but tis one for the ponder room:
There was a young lady named Bright
Whose speed was far faster than light
She went out one day
In a realative way
And returned the previous night :confused: :8

Loose rivets
28th Feb 2006, 23:03
Must go...be back in a flash.

puts phote on, and departs.

G-CPTN
1st Mar 2006, 00:55
shoot, I left my watch..does anyone know what time it is?

It was 23.53
Hope that helps.

allan907
1st Mar 2006, 01:26
and in hypnosis we can make time expand or contract at will. Very useful in convincing someone that they have been a non-smoker for the past year - and all done in 15 minutes!

SoundBarrier
1st Mar 2006, 01:31
DO NOT READ allan907's post more than once!!:uhoh:

It will hypnotise you and make you think that the thread has just started, BUT we're on page 4!!:{ :oh:

Edit to make the post make sense!

Arm out the window
1st Mar 2006, 03:27
Sorry, Civis, I do apologise. Far be it from me to criticise tachyons and such things that are well beyond my comprehension.
Speaking of relativity, though, that's a very popular subject here in certain parts, particularly in Tasmania, where it's possible to be one's father's cousin, uncle and son all at the same time.
:eek:

broadreach
1st Mar 2006, 03:58
Don't know about time. Just that it keeps getting faster every year. The usual thirty minutes or so I used to have to process a thought are now reduced to five or less; the thirty seconds it should take to write down this reply, is now more like five minutes.

Unfair. But excuse me, I have to leave and decide how to spend the remaining minutes of my life...

Civis! About time we had a limerick thread again...
There was a young lady from York
Who had an affair with a cork
....

Let's see who can work that into Drapes' "Time" thread.
:p

Loose rivets
1st Mar 2006, 06:55
There was a young lady from York
Who had an affair with a cork.
After thirty five minutes
it had reached inner limits
and made it more awkward to walk.:ugh:

acbus1
1st Mar 2006, 07:03
Here's a combining of the thread topic and the attempted sabotage drift topic.........


Mary had a little watch
She swallowed it one day.
So then she took some castor oil
To pass the time away.

The castor oil, it did not work
The watch, it did not pass.
But if she needs to know the time
She just looks up her @r$e!

:}

Arm out the window
1st Mar 2006, 08:51
There was a space traveller named Brum
Who went for a trip round the Sun
His twin brother Rory
died of old age before 'e
got back and disappeared up his own bum!

That's real poetry, that is, if I do say so myself.
(Had a couple of beers though)

tony draper
1st Mar 2006, 12:51
Time, a poem
by Tony Draper

Tempus Fugit! this is true
time flies it never sits,
Sad it is to look down and see,
ones pecks have turned to tits.

Tiz sad when autumn comes around,
your sixpack once ridged and svelt
is now all soft and floppy
and hangs below your belt.

That gleaming row of shining teeth
that smiled a smile fantastic,
have gone the way of all flesh,
and now are made of plastic.


Worse again is winter,
where golden locks stood bold,
one has to wear a wooly cap
to keep out the feckin cold.

Avtrician
1st Mar 2006, 13:02
I would go back in time if I could, but me Tardis is being used on another thread. It can cross time but not thread boundries:E

Wyler
1st Mar 2006, 13:51
There was a young lady from Kilkenny
Whose favours could be bought for a penny
For half of that sum
You could roger her bum
A source of amusement for many



I think UFOs from are people from the future coming back to change how things turn out. Can't wait til they send the bloke to get rid of Bush.
Then again, they might just be rich tourists on a weekend break from 3012.:cool:

ExSimGuy
31st Mar 2006, 04:52
Edit to make the post make sense!
What the devil for :confused: This is JB





(How on earth did this thread skip a month? Maybe because I was on vacation in UK and US, where time flows much more quickly than here in the Middle-East where, as everyone knows, it flows so slowly that it takes a week to get a days work finished)

Arm out the window
31st Mar 2006, 07:31
P'raps it's all got something to do with that heinous song by Madonna, the one where she's pinched an old Abba keyboard riff, mixed it up with some tachyons and added the poignant lyrics 'Time goes by so slowly, slowly, slowly, slowly ... '

My theory is she's a witch who sacrifices one of her young dancers every month on the full moon to warp time in her personal space, thus warding off the signs of ageing, as well as leading people to believe she's a musician.

arcniz
31st Mar 2006, 10:33
Q.
The second is the duration of 9 192 631 770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the caesium-133 atom.

Who originally came up with that one!!!??

A.
In 1967, the 13th General Conference on Weights and Measures first defined the International System (SI) unit of time, the second, in terms of atomic time rather than the motion of the Earth. Specifically, a second was defined as the duration of 9,192,631,770 cycles of microwave light absorbed or emitted by the hyperfine transition of cesium-133 atoms in their ground state undisturbed by external fields.



From the age of 12, or so, I have parceled out my life in nanoseconds. That was quite a while ago, (they were invented not too much before then, some say), so the little things have been accumulating and piling up in a nuisancesome way. Fortunately they are small.

With a bucket of nanoseconds - or picoseconds or femto or attoseconds, one can do many marvelous things. Unfortunately most of the really neat things are either immoral, illegal, secret for military reasons, or just so overwhelmingly dull that people will fall over when hit square-on with the thought.

Buzz is that the universe is 14 (US-type) billion years old. And there are 31.6 million seconds a year. So, this gets us to 443 million billion seconds since time began. Based on the rate of progress in computing during the last century, by the end of this century we should have computers capable of analyzing and simulating events and processes at the resolution of one second - for all the time the universe has existed, and do it once or twice a day. That's gotta come in handy for something, eh?


The speed of light, with nothing interfering, spans a tad over over a foot per nanosecond - that's a thousand-millionth of a second. Radio waves travel a bit slower in the atmosphere. Electricity in a very good quality wire will take about 1.5 nanoseconds to travel a foot. A little change in the thickness, or a small kink in the wire, might slow that down to 1.6 nanoseconds per foot.

If one looks at the variations in the speed of a pulse through a wire using a resolution of one picosecond ( a thousandth of a nanosecond, which isn't that hard to do, nowadays), then one can detect the location of a kink or stretch to less than 1/100 th of an inch..even if the wire itself is hundreds or thousands of feet in length and has many kinks and stretches. This (an exercise for the curious) prospectively provides one good way to help keep carbon-composite tails from falling off large passenger aircraft, making those picoseconds seem really valuable.

The 133 isotope of caesium is good for making clocks because it is built like a brick ****house from the resonance perspective. Fifty-four electrons spin in relatively balanced, stable orbitals and one little girlie electron wobbles around in the outermost shell, highly susceptible to the influence of external stimulation. When tickled with energy, it pops up a quantum level, making a distinctive echo in the surrounding energy field, then later pops down to the resting quantum level with another type of echo. Sensing the up echo and timing a repeating stimulus signal with it allows the process to be tuned for endless repetition at a multiple of that magical 9.2 GHZ rate, perfectly tied to the quantum mechanics of the atoms.

I have my own personal little cesium clock in the corner. Never have to wind it, but it does take a while to settle down to best results if not used regularly. Sometimes I have races with other folk's clocks to see who has the steadiest. One part in 10 to the 13th is the ballpark. It's another variant of the big-watch thing.

frostbite
31st Mar 2006, 12:11
Too much time on your hands, arcniz?

Conan the Librarian
31st Mar 2006, 13:00
Only just stumbled in here, but I remember reading that Cherenkov radiation had particles that actually exceed the speed of light. This sounds highly suspect to me, but not being a physicist, one simply does not know...

Conan

Confabulous
31st Mar 2006, 13:06
urrrmm... if E=mc(squared), and if ojects become infinitely dense at the speed of light, then why doesn't a torch fly out of your hand when you turn it on? Surely a stream of infinitely dense energy coming out of something that small could propel a rocket to Saturn?

Am I missing something?

ExSimGuy
31st Mar 2006, 18:06
between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the caesium-133 atom.

Who originally came up with that one!!!??
Probably the French:8

But seriously, I am amazed at the quantum level of knowledge expressed here on PPRuNe. How come pilot-left-seaters and old has-been sim engineers are the repositories of things that Einstein would have baulked at ? :\

Has to signify that there IS a God :E

Loose rivets
31st Mar 2006, 18:27
Coooo........Never knew that 55th electron was a girly:oh:

Armed with this information, I can now guess why my new hi tech pilot's watch is so BLOODY ERRATIC!

BALIX
31st Mar 2006, 20:33
urrrmm... if E=mc(squared), and if ojects become infinitely dense at the speed of light, then why doesn't a torch fly out of your hand when you turn it on? Surely a stream of infinitely dense energy coming out of something that small could propel a rocket to Saturn?
Am I missing something?

Cos the torch isn't traveling at the speed of light. The light is, however, and light has no mass therefore it can go as fast as it likes (as long as it doesn't excede the speed of, erm, light...).

arcniz
31st Mar 2006, 23:09
frostbite query: Too much time on your hands, arcniz?

No, not really. By now, most of it has slid between my fingers and landed on the floor. Just keeps slip-sliding away....



Loose rivets says: Coooo........Never knew that 55th electron was a girly

One of those little-known faects. Hard to discern tho - a process rather like chick(en) sexing.


ExSimGuy says: How come pilot-left-seaters and old has-been sim engineers are the repositories of things that Einstein would have baulked at?

One can sometimes make a decent living, selling magic tricks to folks with the proper credentials.

Spinflight
1st Apr 2006, 16:18
There have been plenty of experiments showing particles appearing to travel at above light speeds through various substances, though they can be easily explained using wave particle duality and the uncertainty principle.

In other words they arn't necessarily travelling faster, just that they were a lot closer to the finish line than you originally thought.

ExSimGuy
1st Apr 2006, 18:01
SpinFlight - Yes, I have a calendar ;)

Nice one:ok:

Spinflight
2nd Apr 2006, 03:31
I don't get you....


Am I being dim?? :confused: :confused: