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BOTFOJ
15th Feb 2006, 15:09
http://www.break.com/movies/runoutofgas3.html

UniFoxOs
15th Feb 2006, 15:20
Why did he stop climbing at such a low height?? He could have been much higher with more time to adopt an emergency strategy.

Desert Whine
15th Feb 2006, 15:31
Why did he stop climbing at such a low height?? He could have been much higher with more time to adopt an emergency strategy.Yes but that's not as much fun. You might as well be back in your day job as an airline pilot.

It is, however, more fun than knackerising yourself with tree branches in the ballbag.

MungoP
15th Feb 2006, 16:04
The Q's is not why was he so low...he's low because it's more fun to be low...the Q that needs to be asked is ...why did the prat run out of fuel...( assuming of course that he did...)

Marvin the Robot
15th Feb 2006, 18:13
What was it I used to teach?

Anyone?

See, nobody ever listens.

Always have a place to land should the engine stop/you burst into flames.

(when I say "you" burst into flames, I don't mean you, as in you, the person reading this, nor do I mean you, as in you the human as opposed to the aeroplane in which you have this occurence).

Wish I hadn't started this now.

So he failed in that respect, by being too low to always have a place to land.



Did anyone actually understand that? Please explain it to me if you did (yes, I mean you, as in you, the person reading this as opposed to............God, I'm off again.....I give up :{

Noah Zark.
15th Feb 2006, 20:31
The glide ratio could do with some improvement!

G-CPTN
15th Feb 2006, 20:34
It's like fast driving - you ought to be always looking where you might have your accident if you need to take evasive action (as well as one third of the time looking in your mirrors to see where you've been).

VP959
15th Feb 2006, 20:54
Why didn't he climb?

Well, in a very low inertia ultralight speed is your friend, height is definately second best.

Watch most sensible microlighters. You'll (hopefully!) see that they rotate, then reduce the climb rate to build up a bit of airspeed, before climbing away with a reasonable speed reserve.

This chap failed to follow the most basic rule of all, the "where the heck am I going to go when the engine stops?" rule.

It's drummed into microlighters here, often by cruel instructors suddenly pulling the power off and asking the hapless student where he's going to go.

Unfortunately, the lack of formal pilot training in some places makes accidents like this one more likely.

VP

Davaar
15th Feb 2006, 21:06
This one did not build up airspeed after take-off. He went into an immediate turn to port, fairly steep it seems, but I do not fly ultralights so I am not well-place to judge that, that took him over the highest obstacles that we have a chance to see in the clip.

UniFoxOs
16th Feb 2006, 07:44
The glide ratio could do with some improvement!

I too was surprised how quickly it went down - he seemed to have the stick well back at the end - maybe it was a stall??