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captain cumulonimbus
12th Feb 2006, 15:59
:) Hi all

Paging through a private flying magazine i came across an hilariously named light plane called...wait for it... a "Pipistrel Sinus".I nearly wet myself laughing! Not being too into the small stuff (he says trying his best to sound blase :) ) i never knew this even existed but what on earth would posess someone to name their craft a "Pipistrel Sinus"???

Anyone else noticed ridiculously named aircraft?

Cheers,still laughing Cb

tilewood
12th Feb 2006, 16:42
Well at the risk of stating the bl**ding obvious, "Pipistrel" is a species
of bat, but quite where 'Sinus' comes in I'm not sure.

It probably flies at night with a blocked air intake!! :hmm:

Conan the Librarian
12th Feb 2006, 16:51
Well after all, Mitchell wanted to call the Spitfire the "Shrew" didn't he?



Conan

Konkordski
12th Feb 2006, 16:53
Pipistrel is, I believe, an Italian light aircraft company, so 'Sinus' might be a Latin or Italian term...

http://www.pipistrel.si/images/sinus9.jpg

mymymy
12th Feb 2006, 16:56
Does Beluga qualify?
http://www.op.dlr.de/FF-DR-ER/research/flight/beluga-start1.gif

Marvin the Robot
12th Feb 2006, 16:56
Pipistrel are based in Slovenia.

They also do a "Virus" model.

Great if you get the flying bug, but don't want to pay through the nose?

Non Normal
12th Feb 2006, 16:59
Mymymy, I believe that Beluga isn't so much ridiculously named as it is ridiculous looking.

G-CPTN
12th Feb 2006, 17:00
:) what on earth would posess someone to name their craft a "Pipistrel Sinus"???

si·nus
n.
1. A depression or cavity formed by a bending or curving.
2. Anatomy.
1. A dilated channel or receptacle containing chiefly venous blood.
2. Any of various air-filled cavities in the bones of the skull, especially one communicating with the nostrils.
3. Pathology. A fistula leading from a pus-filled cavity.
4. Botany. A recess or indentation between lobes of a leaf or corolla.


Probably didn't want to call it Pipistrelle's anus

con-pilot
12th Feb 2006, 17:10
Well it could be a bad translation of 'cirrus' the cloud formation.

Or 'Sirius' the star?

Krystal n chips
12th Feb 2006, 17:44
"Advanced" Turbo-Prop !!!:yuk:

Gordon Fraser
12th Feb 2006, 17:48
How about the 'Currie Wot' from the fifties?

rotorblades
12th Feb 2006, 18:23
just a few...
Bailey Kryptonite
T211 Thorpedo
Read Breezy Byplane (suppose this is literal)
Ragwing Special
Air Creation Buggy
Buttles Husky Chaser
Aust Mongoose-pusher (why would you want to push a mongoose?)
Young Gumpskin

Al:}

Grandpa
12th Feb 2006, 18:39
Used to travel with Cosinus...........
maybe they are parents, or close neighbours.......

Jerricho
12th Feb 2006, 18:40
What about A380?
Very feckin' original :rolleyes:

Non Normal
12th Feb 2006, 18:44
787 Dreamliner. Dreamliner sounds far too much like a pantyliner for night-time use!

Ewwww!

tilewood
12th Feb 2006, 19:10
Atel Accountant
Westland Widgeon
HP Herald
Bristol Brabazon
Walrus

Jerricho
12th Feb 2006, 19:15
I do giggle to myself whenever I hear some of the "Beaver" floatplanes round here call up........can't help myself with "And say again your aircraft type"

Yeah I know, grow up. I still giggle as well at Regina

cringe
12th Feb 2006, 19:16
In Slovenian language sinus is both a medical and a trigonometrical term.
As to how Pipistrel got its name:
When we started flying, there were no laws governing the use of trikes. But luckily, I had been one of the senior members of the aviation club, and the people there understood that what I was doing perspective. So we had a silent agreement: when other aircraft were flying, my "scarecrow" was in the hangar; but when they left - when it got dark - we could fly. We fitted the trikes with headlights and taillights to fly in the evening - like bats. So people started saying: "Oh, look at those bats flying again".http://slonews.sta.si/index.php?id=1974&s=75

seacue
12th Feb 2006, 19:21
The font on my browser makes Sirius and Sinus look very nearly the same. I wonder....

con-pilot
12th Feb 2006, 19:48
Well Jerry look at what Dassault did with the names of their aircraft.

First Dassault begat the Falcon 20. (Why 20 instead of the Falcon 10 or Falcon 1 I don't know)

Then Dassault begat the Falcon 10 which became the Falcon 100. (Now this tends to a bit confusing, why call the second falcon a Falcon10 when it was built after the Falcon 20. It could be because it smaller than the 20, but they could have called it the Falcon 20 Junior. The Falcon 10 became the Falcon 100 due to a change of the avionics package, but why didn't they call it the Falcon 10 Plus?)

Then came the Falcon 50. (Er, what happened to the Falcon 30 and Falcon 40? As the Falcon 50 has three engines calling it the 30 would have been logical. The Falcon 50 has become the 50EX.)

Now somewhere during this time came the Falcon 200 which was a Falcon 20 with a glass cockpit and new style of engines that had a bad habit of quiting.

Then came the Falcon 900, again what happened to the Falcon 60, 70, 80, 90, etc, why jump all the way to 900? (The 900 was the first production corporate wide body for Dassault, sadly it was so under powered it had trouble getting out of it's own way at high altitude airports, This was fixed with the 900B which became the 900EX which has now become the 900EZ.)

Then the Falcon 2000 was begat. This airplane consisted of a shortened Falcon 900 fuselage, Falcon 50 wings (less the inboard slats), two engines and a newly designed tail section. (With all the open numbers why 2000? The Falcon 2000 turned into the Falcon 2000EX and then the Falcon 2000EZ.)

Okay, things seem to becoming logical. While the numbering of the aircraft are a little confusing they are keeping the model changes consistent, Falcon XXX EX (EX for extended range and avionics changes) to the Falcon XXX EZ (EZ for a major avionics change.)

But wait! There was the Falcon 900C which became the Falcon 900 DX which is still in production along with the 900EZ. (Getting confused, just wait.)

Now comes the newest, baddest, bestest, meanest biggest Falcon of them all. The 7X!

THE 7X !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Now where the F-heck-K did that come from?

Now do not think I don't like Dassault and the Falcon aircraft, quite the opposite actually. I loved flying the Falcon 50 and 900 series of aircraft, absolutely wonderful flying machines. Built like a tank they are.:ok:

Solid Rust Twotter
12th Feb 2006, 19:59
There's an EAA WWI biplane kit called a Boredom Fighter.

Loose rivets
13th Feb 2006, 05:36
Atel Accountant
Westland Widgeon
HP Herald
Bristol Brabazon
Walrus


HP Herald!!! What's wrong with that? s'where I get me name from.



Sweep the runway when i've gone:sad:

Buster Hyman
13th Feb 2006, 05:52
"Pipistrel Sinus"

:confused: 'snot funny.:confused:

What about the optimistically named Boomerang? Although the following has an interesting name...
http://photos.airliners.net/photos/small/8/7/8/0619878.jpg

Tarq57
13th Feb 2006, 11:29
My all time fav is the Woody Pusher.

(EDIT) and there it is. http://www.warbirdsovernewzealand.com/ml/Woody-Pusher_0512.jpg

FLCH
13th Feb 2006, 12:44
How about the Curtiss Ascender or the Dassault Balzac ??

mymymy
13th Feb 2006, 13:46
Non Normal,
this one is not as ridiculous looking but has interesting name......

http://re2.mm-c1.yimg.com/image/1059185224
Flying Porcupine

(I could only find a thumbnail:\ )
3my

LowObservable
13th Feb 2006, 14:39
And what was the name of the engine in the original Quickie?
It was a four-stroke, I believe.

LowObservable
13th Feb 2006, 14:42
How about this deadly, sleek predator, the Blackburn Shark:http://www.rcaf.com/aircraft/photos/shark.jpg

G-CPTN
13th Feb 2006, 14:44
And what was the name of the engine in the original Quickie?
It was a four-stroke, I believe.

Don't know, but the Porcupine had FOUR (yes, four) big bristols . . . :ok:

BALIX
13th Feb 2006, 14:52
Vickers Vanguard. I mean, who had the bright idea of naming an aircraft after the bloke who looks after a clergyman's utility vehicle :confused: :confused: :rolleyes:

Jo Cover
13th Feb 2006, 14:55
GENERAL AVIA COSTRUZIONI AERONAUTICHE SRL F22A PINGUINI! Why on earth a Pinguini??

http://www.ppl.flyer.co.uk/pfa99/g-fzza.jpg

chuks
13th Feb 2006, 15:27
The United States used to train pilots on the Vultee BT-13 'Vibrator.' I guess it had certain NVH (Noise, Vibration and Harshness) issues, hence the nickname... and back then society was much more discreet about a certain class of toy, appliance, prosthetic or aid.

They scrapped most of them after the second World War, well before the DeHavilland Canada DHC-2 'Beaver' came onto the market. This was probably just as well.

jabberwok
13th Feb 2006, 15:40
One I always liked was the Reid & Sigrist R.S.1 Snargasher. :cool: