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View Full Version : Pharaonic tomb find stuns Egypt


tall and tasty
10th Feb 2006, 21:16
Watched the evening news and this came up. As a child who was dragged around archeological sites by my father/grandfather to help dig I can imagine the atmosphere once they realized what had been uncovered.

http://http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/4700032.stm (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/4700032.stm)


I wonder how many more undiscovered wonders there are still left on the planet??


TnT :ok:

Onan the Clumsy
10th Feb 2006, 21:39
I'll have to go and tell my Mummy.

Davaar
10th Feb 2006, 21:41
Yes, Tall, and we could look more narrowly than the planet. I used to know a chap who would speculate on what and how much and how many we would find if we dug up every back garden in England!

G-CPTN
10th Feb 2006, 22:01
Beats me why they haven't soaked the site with GeoPhys equipment.

tony draper
10th Feb 2006, 22:09
Digging up bodies was a popular pastime in your old country at one time Mr Davaar.
Seems to me that folks in the old days went to great deal of trouble spent a great deal of time and coin to build a nice gaff to spend eternity in, and along comes some bearded university coves and digs em up,tint fair it int.
:rolleyes:

chiglet
10th Feb 2006, 22:10
TnT
We know a lot about a little, and a little about a lot....
There's [a lot] more than we can [ever] learn on this planet.
watp,iktch

flowman
10th Feb 2006, 22:25
"...as we know, there are known knowns, there are things we know we know,"

"We also know there are known unknowns; that is to say we know there are some things we do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns — the ones we don't know we don't know."

Donald Rumsfeld

Pharoanic, is that a word? :confused:

G-CPTN
10th Feb 2006, 22:30
An expert is someone who starts off knowing a little about everything, then learns more and more about less and less until they end up knowing everything about nothing.

Noah Zark.
10th Feb 2006, 22:33
Apparently the discoverers were led by a team from the University of Memphis. I wonder if "The King" is buried there? :)

tony draper
10th Feb 2006, 22:38
Hmmm,One hates being pedantic but surely a expert is someone who has expertise in one area, whereas the correct term for someone who has expertise in many fields would be a Polymath
:rolleyes:

allan907
10th Feb 2006, 22:46
No Drapes! A polymath is a parrot what can count, innit? I got stacks of them in my back yard.

G-CPTN
10th Feb 2006, 23:35
someone who has expertise in many fields would be a Polymath
:rolleyes:


So why do they call it 'expertise'? Should it not therefore be polymathematics?

Davaar
10th Feb 2006, 23:50
Dr draper, one places little uncritical trust in academic pointy heads. In what we laughingly refer to as our "work" we recently reviewed psychiatric reports which left the question: Which is physician and which is patient?

Close intellectual stuff about the patient's grief on the death of brother Bob. Sad enough, all will agree, but when we mak siccar, Bob was a dog.

To return to our muttons, surely what we mostly do is look at the aftermath?

airship
10th Feb 2006, 23:59
Correct me if I'm wrong...?! But these people did everything that came into their heads in order not to be disturbed after death. Yet here we are, a couple of thousand years later...

If someone was to dig up your grandma tonight, there'd probably be a huge outcry. But because we want to know just how many cats, and their servants were buried alive back then, we lose all respect!

Ergo... :rolleyes:

tony draper
11th Feb 2006, 00:09
Oddly enough it wasn't illegal to dig up someones grandma at one time,people who indulged in such practices could only be charged with stealing a shroud, damaging a headstone or summat similar,it being deemed that a corpse had no protection under the law,it remained thus until some important people started turning up on the desecting tables,things being the same then as now, the law was rapidly changed.
Yer don't **** with important people even when they is dead.
:uhoh:
Anyone care to wager on how long it will take the press to err, resurect the Curse of the Pharo's.

BlueDiamond
11th Feb 2006, 00:24
At least these remains will probably be accorded more respect and care than Carter/Carnarvon et. al. showed when they deliberately desecrated the body of King Tutankhamun in order to get at the valuables buried with it.

airship
11th Feb 2006, 00:30
Well Drapes, since Nigeria's just been hit pretty hard by H5N1 and there don't appear to be any measures in place in order to control Africa's first outbreak of the flu virus, your words may prove to be prophetic. Africa may not have been the origin of AIDS, but it's where the virus got a hold and propagated...?!

Perhaps in 2010, when the 'survivors' hold their 1st annual conference in Milton Keynes, in the wake of the ravages caused when avian flu first became transmissable between human-beings, a small voice from the back will endeavour to make himself heard: 'It was also in 2006 that we unearthed the throne of...?!'

tony draper
11th Feb 2006, 00:31
Madam BD untold thousands of mummies lay about Egypt in those days,there was even a scheme to import shiploads of them into America as fuel for a power station,as they were highly inflamable, I kid you not,those chaps were men of their time one doesn't suppose they tret the live Egyptians much better.
:uhoh:
Actually Mr airship there was populary held theory in the 1920's that the blowing of a ancient war trumpet from Tuts tomb live on the radio brought about the first world war.

tinpis
11th Feb 2006, 01:33
In fact the steamers plying the Luxor trade apparently used mummies for fuel.http://www.augk18.dsl.pipex.com/Smileys/mummy.gif

prospector
11th Feb 2006, 02:23
" Polymath"

Thanks for pointing out that word, just what I need to finish my CV.

That is if anyone is hiring "age challenged people" any more.

Prospector

RJM
11th Feb 2006, 03:17
Interesting point, Airship. I've wondered myself at what point or span of time elapsed does a 'grave desecration' cease to be repugnant and disrespectful and become 'an archaeological dig'?

I can't imagine a group of academics gleefully digging up, say, Churchill tomorrow and happily dismembering what's left (although he was mainly right :hmm: ) and dating the bones etc.

Loose rivets
11th Feb 2006, 05:03
One was always fascinated by Egyptology.

When the T/V program showed the similarity in patern to (Orion's belt?) stars-having adjusted for the years–with the position of the pyramids, I was enthralled.

Why was that little conduit made to accurately point that way? And why was there a door, some way up the square section duct, to seal it?

What did they know that we don't?

Solid Rust Twotter
11th Feb 2006, 05:14
In fact the steamers plying the Luxor trade apparently used mummies for fuel.http://www.augk18.dsl.pipex.com/Smileys/mummy.gif


As did the railways. Some pretty spectacular ruins in the Sudan and much older than the Great Pyramid IIRC.

Marvin the Robot
11th Feb 2006, 05:24
Some years ago, when the trade in Mummies was at it's unregulated height, they were ground up into powder and used to produce elixirs of life, aphrodisiacts etc. :ooh:

Tricky Woo
11th Feb 2006, 07:27
Archeology must have been a blast in its 19th C/early 20th C heydays. Characters similar to Indiana Jones really did exist, although they were usually French or Brit, never got the girl, and hired gangs of thugs to do the fighting and digging. Erm, rather like those German baddies on Indiana Jones.

Remember the bit where the German archeologist swallows a fly? I bet the old archeologists ate thousands.

Where was I?

Oh yes, imagine arriving in Giza or Memphis 150 years ago, and all around are piles of sand that no one had got around to root under? Must have been great fun. Then yer get yer rent-a-crowd gang of natives to dig like hell moving aside 200 tonnes of sand in a day until something valuable, erm, of historic importance is uncovered, and then a quick ship back to Blighty; Royal Academy speech, fame, fortune, and a quick trip to the auction house to flog off some lesser trinkets, quick shag with a duchess or six, and back to Egypt for more digging.

Nowadays? Well, it's all careful wafting of earth with a pastry brush these days, molecule by molecule, and then (wow!) a small piece of wood appears, and the whoile dig stops while the wood is measured in situ, photographed. Then the wood is placed into a plastic bag, bar-coded, and sent to the local laboratory who confirm (gasp) it's a 2,000 year old piece of wood! And the tests prove it's a real piece of a tree, in fact an Egyptian tree, examples of which still grow in the garden next to the bloody laboratory.

20 years later, and 3mm further down, and a small shard of pottery is found... hmm, I wonder type of clay the pottery is made of?

Meanwhile, 5 metres below, there's the shared tomb of Jesus Christ and his wife, Mark Anthony, Cleopatra, King Arthur and Socrates, complete with a full library etched onto copper of their biographies, writings, working examples of a roman combustion engine, an longitude-accurate phonecian map of the world, plus the left buttock of an unlucky alien who's spacecraft crashed into an Atlantian pyramid.

But it'll never be found, will it? Cos at this rate it'll take another 5,000 years to get down that far.

One believes that the old ways were the best, although a JCB or two would have made all the difference.

TW

Davaar
11th Feb 2006, 07:37
Quite true, Dr draper:
_________________________
Digging up bodies was a popular pastime in your old country at one time Mr Davaar
_________________________

One is oneself unique in that one did in a former life prepare and effect the conveyance of that self-same apartment in which Burke and Hare did their fell work. It is in the Grassmarket, as one recalls. The B & H practice was to accelerate Nature and provide bodies before effluxion of the tedious delay until they had died and been buried.

Of interest to none, I suppose, but the historian and perhaps to you, one must be one of the last ever to do a tinsel (from the verb “to tyne”; no connexion with the river, one thinks) of the feu. This is a process gone, sadly, for ever with the recent abolition of the feudal system of conveyancing. We are now one with Yesterday’s twice Seven Thousand Years. One did it but the once, though, so it was scarcely steady work.

How pleasant once again to share a page with Tricky Woo.

SLFguy
11th Feb 2006, 08:17
ooh ... I'm off to Luxor on Monday....have to nip down to the garden centre for a new shovel.....:)

tony draper
11th Feb 2006, 08:22
Watched a facinating doc about Pompeii,apparently rude paintings and statuary were quite popular among Pompeians,so the Victorians being a prudish lot employed people top go round painting out the naughty bits and chisling off the nether organs on statues,the Rude man of Cern also had some refurbishment and lost his bits.
:uhoh:

Creaser
11th Feb 2006, 09:33
ooh ... I'm off to Luxor on Monday....have to nip down to the garden centre for a new shovel.....:)

Then Tescos for "fava beans and a nice chianti"



Creaser

supercarb
12th Feb 2006, 15:20
Actually Mr airship there was populary held theory in the 1920's that the blowing of a ancient war trumpet from Tuts tomb live on the radio brought about the first world war.

Erm...

1. No live radio in 1914
2. Tut's tomb was not discovered until 1923

Perhaps it's WW2 rather than WW1 that this story refers to?

360 degree mason
15th Feb 2006, 17:57
One was always fascinated by Egyptology.
When the T/V program showed the similarity in patern to (Orion's belt?) stars-having adjusted for the years–with the position of the pyramids, I was enthralled.
Why was that little conduit made to accurately point that way? And why was there a door, some way up the square section duct, to seal it?
What did they know that we don't?


Mate the pyramids were aligned with the 3 stars in orion, that represented the kemetic god Ausar, which the europeans now know as osiris.

They were built on cosmic law.

In the bible (torah) Amos 5:8 it says "seeketh him who maketh the seven stars and orion" blatant reference to these colossals.

ImHotep:ok:

tony draper
15th Feb 2006, 18:51
If the buggas were that clever how come they didn't think of concrete?,twould have made lif a lot easier forrem.
:rolleyes:

360 degree mason
15th Feb 2006, 19:38
If the buggas were that clever how come they didn't think of concrete?,twould have made lif a lot easier forrem.
:rolleyes:


'cos they were waiting for you to invent it. i can see it now:

"drapers super strenth concrete. £4.99 a bag, made from oatmeal and butter"

"not suitable for building civilisations!"

lol

SLFguy
23rd Feb 2006, 13:05
Right I'm back... had a look down the hole on Sunday....lots of locals with sacks of sand, (mostly with large enough hole to redistribute the sand back from whence it came - reckon they'll be done in 15 years.... Valley has changed in past 5 years since I was there last - now has some Disneyland style choo choo trains to take you 150 yards from car park to the tombs :{

Just to keep it on aviation track...

MAN to LUX...one hour into flight 'divert to Luton'... before arriving Luton...'divert to Gatwick'....3 hours later - back in air only to have a G/A at Luxor. Ms SLF doesn't like flying so was not a happy bunny.... just how pleased was she to see a DASH 8 to take us from MAN to ABZ on the way home....:\