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flapsforty
10th Feb 2006, 08:05
We have a mod who's called 4HolerPoler, and just I read the expression 'poling along' on the 'memorable pax' thread.
I presume poling means flying; anyone able to tell me how that came about?

Mebbe there's no explanation... when our pilots fly a tad faster than normal they call it 'door-boren' literally meaning 'to drill throug'. I can see the logic in drilling through the air, but poling?
... visions of hatted beribonned chaps in Gondolas ..... ;)

Solid Rust Twotter
10th Feb 2006, 08:28
Joy sticks used to be a straight pole stuck through a hole in the floor (if you had a floor).

patdavies
10th Feb 2006, 08:39
But I have also heared 'poling along' used with regard to motoring.

I suspect, but have no proof, that since in their respective infancies, both motoring and flying were the preserve of the rich upper classes that the reference comes form punting - where a flat bottomed boat is propelled by virtue of using a long pole aginst the river bed (like a gondoier)

Whirlygig
10th Feb 2006, 08:41
Joy sticks used to be a straight pole stuck through a hole in the floor

Sort of still are with a helicopter and in that context, the term is quite common.

Cheers

Whirls

Grainger
10th Feb 2006, 08:45
'cept in a Robbo, of course... ;)

Now of course the 'T' bar works really well - it only feels like it's going to break off in your hand - but it is a wibbly wobbly world in there !

tony draper
10th Feb 2006, 08:56
Yer all wrong.:rolleyes:

Poling-induced structural change and second-order nonlinearity of Na+-doped Nb2O5-TeO2 glass


Abstract. The effect of thermal/electrical poling on surface structure and poling-induced second-harmonic generation have been examined for 15Nb2O $_{5} \cdot 85$TeO2 glass. Since the poling was carried out with the 15Nb2O $_{5} \cdot 85$TeO2 glass sandwiched in between two commercial borosilicate glasses containing Na+, penetration of Na+ into the anode-side surface of 15Nb2O $_{5} \cdot 85$TeO2 glass took place, as revealed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS studies also suggest that Nb5+ migrates from the anode-side surface into the bulk by the poling. It is thought that the migration of Na+ and Nb5+ forms an internal dc electric field, leading to the second-harmonic generation.

Desert Whine
10th Feb 2006, 09:45
The original came from 3HolerPoler, what you call a 7-two driver. He posts occasionally.

But BungHolerPoler was more up some peoples' alleys... What happened to him??

Kaptin M?? ;)

DX Wombat
10th Feb 2006, 09:45
There is always: 5.5 yards = 1 rod, pole or perch. For a fuller list of the old Imperial Measurements (for those not brought up properly) :E see here: http://www.gwydir.demon.co.uk/jo/units/length.htm

tart1
10th Feb 2006, 17:54
I also seem to remember a brownholerpoler. :uhoh:

tall and tasty
10th Feb 2006, 18:02
I also seem to remember a brownholerpoler.I do too and to be honest I don't think he was that bad!

TnT :p

Paterbrat
10th Feb 2006, 18:04
Would personaly go with the pole control in early aircraft, a long stick with the various control wires for wing warping and pitch control attatched.

Shaggy Sheep Driver
10th Feb 2006, 19:30
Watcha mean, early aircraft? All the good ones have a stick, new and old (Spitfire, Lighning, Vulcan, Chipmunk, Stampe, Extra 300.....etc, etc.) :ok:

SSD

captain cumulonimbus
10th Feb 2006, 20:17
"Poling" is indeed common,at least here in SA.Have also heard a B737/BE20 FO refer to the very same as "Winding" (as in "winding up your window etc").

:confused: Didnt bother asking.

Have also heard of "steaming".

Loose rivets
10th Feb 2006, 21:01
Pretty standard term. ‘I was doing the paperwork, while Fred did the poling.' for example.


XPS studies also suggest that Nb5+ migrates from the anode-side surface into the bulk by the poling. It is thought that the migration of Na+ and Nb5+ forms an internal dc electric field, leading to the second-harmonic generation.

I bet you made that up.

jon s gull
10th Feb 2006, 22:40
Real aeroplanes still have a pole.

An alternative could be an ice hole fisherman with four rods.

tony draper
10th Feb 2006, 22:56
Buggah!! one has been rumbled.:(

george bridson
11th Feb 2006, 00:19
Over enthusiastic rotation on a winch launch as a glider pilot usually referred to as pole-bending. Frowned upon as the possible outcome is a steep stall with a wing drop-induced cartwheel:{

R4+Z
11th Feb 2006, 03:53
My take on this would be that poling along comes from the days barges used canals and often poles were used to propel the barge through tunnels and the like.

Well it sounds good to me.

:D :D :D

Sultan Ismail
11th Feb 2006, 04:08
ShaggySheepDriver
The Vulcan did not have a pole. It used half a yoke stuck on the end of a "through the panel" shaft just like the common span can