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The SSK
31st Jan 2006, 11:47
Curious to watch BBC2 yesterday - 'Balderdash and Piffle' followed by 'The Thick of It'. The latter had the standard Beeb warning about bad language and was wall-to-wall 'F'-swearing - seriously funny programme nevertheless.

The former had to have a special *very* bad language warning, because it included a fairly serious piece on the 'C' word which was not only spoken (gasp! - first time on TV?) several times but was painted on a wall in 4ft high letters by Germaine Greer.

I still remember falling off my chair when Kenneth Tynan uttered the BBC's first-ever 'F**k'.

tony draper
31st Jan 2006, 11:50
As one said elsewhere re Miz Greer investigating the "C" word, it takes a thief to catch a thief.
:rolleyes:

UL730
31st Jan 2006, 11:52
Crikey - not Germaine :uhoh:

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/39334000/jpg/_39334163_germainegreer_bbc_body203.jpg

Buster Hyman
31st Jan 2006, 11:52
I believe that she only recently realised she had one...or was it was one??

angels
31st Jan 2006, 11:58
It's been heard many times in the background of football coverage.

Just last Saturday the ditty (sung to the tune of 'My old man said follow the band) was audible on several occasions during the Wolves/Man Utd game.

My old man said be a City fan,
I said, '**** off winker you're a cnut.'

Tis an old one but always seem to fool the producers who never get the soundman to hit the off button on the crowd mikes.

frostbite
31st Jan 2006, 12:01
Also frequently used (too often?) in C4 'Shameless' for some years now.

G-CPTN
31st Jan 2006, 12:04
Didn't see the programme, but I read a trail in a mag that Ms Greer tried some years ago to popularise the C word (Lord knows exactly what her motives were/are). It was deduced that her actions have failed as it is (was) still taboo with the Beeb. Watch this space (no, not THIS space - this is merely a euphemism for let's see what happens on BBCTV).
It's strange how SOME nationalities accept body parts and bodily functions as 'normal' whereas they scorn religious references (as swearing). We were initially shocked in Denmark that the 'usual' English swear words were not taboo, whereas blaspheming was a no-no.

tony draper
31st Jan 2006, 12:07
Tiz a very ancient word and was even included in Street Names in the past,such as Grope Cnut Lane,in London,weird how some words become verbotten and others once forbiden become common parlance.
One can recal a time when if you used the "F" word in mixed company say in a pub, you would have been on the floor spitting out teeth very shortly thereafter.
We all swore like troopers but never, repeat never, in front of the womenfolk.
:rolleyes:

Whirlygig
31st Jan 2006, 12:10
Same in Ireland; most Anglo-Saxon "swear" words are reasonably commonplace but you could seriously offend a lot of people by taking the Lord's name in vain!

Personally, I'm not bothered by the word but then, I'm not bothered by any words (apart from "mauve" which just sounds horrible!!) - it's the context in which they're used which causes the offence. The concept of the word is hardly offensive so why should the actual word?

But it is quite a "hard", "aggressive" sounding word and this was Germaine's point last night. She's capitulated and now pleased that the word is still taboo and she now believes it has more power.

Cheers

Whirls

south coast
31st Jan 2006, 12:13
missed the bbc 2 programme last night as am in usa and the tv is so good here they dont need bbc2!

with regards to the word in question, i have it on good authority that origins of the word date back to old english times when it meant, ' a hole in the bush'...as in, ' lets cut throught this cnut into the next field...'

not difficult to see how its modern day meaning came to be then...

anyone agree with this or know of anything better?

AerocatS2A
31st Jan 2006, 12:13
The former had to have a special *very* bad language warning, because it included a fairly serious piece on the 'C' word which was not only spoken (gasp! - first time on TV?)

Not the first time. It has been spoken in Sex and the City at least once.

tony draper
31st Jan 2006, 12:17
Its origins in one form or another date back way beyond old English Mr south coast,according to that prog anyway,all the way back to the Indo European language.
:cool:

Wedge
31st Jan 2006, 12:46
I believe that she only recently realised she had one...or was it was one??

That's very unfair actually Buster, I think this is the quote that is remembered as her attempt to popularise the word referred to above:

Sadism is the necessary outcome of the belief that one sex is passive and suffers sex at the hands of another. If we are to escape any of the hideous effects of this mythology, effects which include war and capital punishment, we must regain the power of the c***.

(Germaine Greer "Lady Love Your C***," Suck (London 1971).)

Certainly not the first time it's been said on TV. C4's recent series on profanity catalogued the many times it's been broadcast since the 1970s. It's even said several times by John Travolta in 1970s disco movie 'Saturday Night Fever'.

Onan the Clumsy
31st Jan 2006, 12:57
I went to see the Vagina Monologues once (because a friends daughter had a friend that was in it). Well you have to understand that this girl was a beautiful intelligent eighteen (ish) year old with Iranian parents.

It got to her part the lights went dim, the spot came on and she had the stage to herself. Then for three minutes shes just said "**** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** **** ****... etc etc". It was like listening to me do a DIY project

A very odd experience.

ronnie3585
31st Jan 2006, 13:00
Anyone who has listened to Derek and Clive must be very fimiliar with the "c" word... thank you Peter Cook!:}

Wedge
31st Jan 2006, 13:07
....oh and I forgot about 'Jerry Springer the Opera', broadcast on the BBC last year - of which the programmes opponents took the trouble to count every single 'C' word (taking into account the number of actors on stage) - and came up with a total of no fewer than 297 (plus 3168 'f***s').

tony draper
31st Jan 2006, 13:35
Remember reading something about the outrage caused when Lily Langtree used the word "Bloody" on stage for the first time, questions in the house,death threats the playright ect.
The first use of the "C" word on Brit telly I recal was way back in the sixties on a Frost Prog some anti vietnam war huggy fluff hippy type used it when being interviewed by Frosty,much national outrage caused of course.
Interesting series of documentries being shown on UK History channel on the History of Pornography at the mo,tiz amazing the lengths authorities would go to keep it from the public eye,such as obliterating the Rude Man of Cern Abbas's willy,apparently it was not replaced until the the early ninteen hundreds and even then amid much hand wringing, they seemed to think the sight of a enormouse willy would encourage revolution among the great unwashed.
:rolleyes:

G-CPTN
31st Jan 2006, 13:50
the Rude Man of Cern Abbas's willy,apparently it was not replaced until the the early ninteen hundreds and even then amid much hand wringing,

It had to be coaxed back?
I know just the man for the job . . .

sixmilehighclub
31st Jan 2006, 15:05
How to repel sixmilehighclub....

Use the 'C' word once. Wait for disappointed response. Use it a second time, job done.

G-CPTN
31st Jan 2006, 15:08
Eee lass! Tha's not into Mellors then?

Ontariotech
31st Jan 2006, 15:40
Buster Hyman Wrote:
I believe that she only recently realised she had one...or was it was one??

Ha ha ha ha ha ....:p :p :p

sailor
31st Jan 2006, 15:44
I believe that a Canadian squadron during WWII planted poppy seeds one spring on the upper portion and waited for the subsequent rash of clapping!

Burnt Fishtrousers
31st Jan 2006, 19:39
I seem to recall a few years back, the "Peterborough Gazette" ran a piece on King Canute . Next day they had to print an apology for misspelling Canute.....silly cnuts

Wedge
31st Jan 2006, 20:18
Ah yes, a misprint. Reminds me of Nicky Campbell's slip on the R5 breakfast show last year, which I've tracked down. Warning contains inadvertant strong language:

http://www.ivorysky.com/files/nicky_campbell.mp3

:E

MMEMatty
31st Jan 2006, 22:22
Isnt it true that the word "Quaint", so beloved of american tourists, is just a derivation of the "C" word?

Or is Bill Bryson lying to me again

Matt