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PAXboy
30th Jan 2006, 23:11
In The Indepdendent Monday 30th January.
Ponds, rich in diverse and rare species, are vanishing from the British landscape - and your country needs you to replace them. It's time to get digging, says Sanjida O'Connell Discuss how new ponds can help rebuilding our planet and don't forget the pond-life that lives in them ... :=

Loose rivets
31st Jan 2006, 03:07
Please don't forget the pond life, or these little treasures will simply become breeding grounds for mosquitoes.

ExSimGuy
31st Jan 2006, 03:48
Build (or dig) a nice pond in the back yard, stock it with pretty multi-coloured fishes. . . .

. .. and feed the neighbourhood cats :sad:

NOT!

tony draper
31st Jan 2006, 06:07
Much easier to go to homebase and purchase a flat pack pond.
It is true though,there used to be lots of newt ponds around here for us sprogs to plodge about in, but they have all gone now.
:hmm:

Standard Noise
31st Jan 2006, 08:22
.......don't forget the pond-life that lives in them ... :=
Indeed, we should never forget the plight of the poor journos!:}

MagnusP
31st Jan 2006, 08:30
Build (or dig) a nice pond in the back yard, stock it with pretty multi-coloured fishes. . . .

. .. and feed the neighbourhood cats :sad:

NOT!
Unless your friendly neighbourhood heron gets there first......

Capn Notarious
31st Jan 2006, 09:26
Tsk tsk. Some lacklustre responses. We can do better, positive mental approach.
The pond need not be level with the ground.
A substantial retaining wall can be sat on.
Rainwater may be diverted from down pipes to keep water level topped up.
A net will keep out the heron; that is a wading bird.
Cats around the pond may be thwarted, by careful construction, so that a shallow marginal shelf doesn't afford enough water for fish to swim in,
Moving water; away from a home, supposed to be good for the Feng Shui.
Then the first Dragonfly, you will marvel at its hovering.
Ponds are able to give pleasure.

Things natural: theraputic.

Bahn-Jeaux
31st Jan 2006, 09:36
I am all for a few more ponds.
Nothing finer than sitting by the edge of a pond on a nice winters evening watching loads of lovely ducks fly in...............................then shooting the tasty li'l 'ol critters.:}

maggioneato
31st Jan 2006, 09:56
Tsk tsk. Some lacklustre responses. We can do better, positive mental approach.
The pond need not be level with the ground.
A substantial retaining wall can be sat on.
Rainwater may be diverted from down pipes to keep water level topped up.
A net will keep out the heron; that is a wading bird.
Cats around the pond may be thwarted, by careful construction, so that a shallow marginal shelf doesn't afford enough water for fish to swim in,
Moving water; away from a home, supposed to be good for the Feng Shui.
Then the first Dragonfly, you will marvel at its hovering.
Ponds are able to give pleasure.
Things natural: theraputic.
This is how we built our outdoor pond, with a retaining wall. Safe for children, no trouble from cats and heron. Best one is inside, built within a conservatory, retaining wall to stop fools falling in, used all year round, very relaxing, no dragonflies though. Lots of lovely fish to watch.

airship
31st Jan 2006, 13:01
I'd much prefer yer proverbial swamp to any old pond.

But if money was no object, what I really fancy is an indoor pond in a 'Kew Garden' type structure:

The pond's dimensions would be about 150ft x 250ft. At one end would be the wave-making machine. This is to aerate the entirely natural coral reef running along both edges. One should also be able to get a decent bodysurf down the centre 'pass'. About 2/3rds of the way down would be a little desert island with a few coconut trees (you need at least 2 to hang the hammock) to 'break' the surf. At the other end would be a gently sloping sandy beach. Everything would be imported from Bora Bora. I've prolly forgotten something, but you have the general idea...

BTW, no probs with wading birds 'cause there'd be a roof and central heating. I do have a few questions though. I'd like to have a couple of those small black-tip sharks - is 2 enough or do sharks get lonely when not in a pack? Also, how do I keep them from eating all the other fish? ;)

G-CPTN
31st Jan 2006, 13:09
Get a few Nile crocodiles (for conservation purposes, as since the construction of the Aswan Dam they cannot reach the lower reaches).

Rushton
31st Jan 2006, 13:14
Sadly miss my old ponds (4). Had loadsa frogs, newts and breeding koi . Never had any problem with mozzies. Never used filter systems or pumps, all oxygenated naturally. Spent many an hour just watching all them little critters.

airship
31st Jan 2006, 13:35
A few Nile crocodiles: now there's food for thought! They could be kept caged up at one end, let out for the day one invites 'people one's fallen out with'... :8 They only need feeding once or twice a year I hear, so I guess I could keep them from starving... :E

Hang on, this is a seawater pond we're talking about. Can't be Nile crocs then. Have to import some from Oz?!

Jordan D
1st Feb 2006, 00:15
Water World - didn't Kevin Costner do something similar a few years back ....

Jordan

Solid Rust Twotter
1st Feb 2006, 05:41
Chinese aquaculture has it figured out. Rice planted in paddies, chooks in coop above paddies, chook organic fertiliser drops into paddies. Husks and stalks fed to chooks, fish in paddies assist with insect control and dispose of leftover chook crap and the odd duck kept alongside for a bit of variety on the menu.

With the amount of wetlands along the Nile in the Sudan, I'm pretty sure this could be viable but I guess it's easier to just wait for food to fall out of the sky... - as it does...:hmm:

A battalion of Chinese farmers dropped in the Sudan could solve a lot of the world's food problems.