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Rollingthunder
28th Jan 2006, 09:26
I actually learnt in Montclair, New Jersey, many miles from home. I fell so many times, it was daunting and I thought this would never work. Then, something clicked and the two wheeled world was beautiful.

G-CPTN
28th Jan 2006, 09:30
I learned on the Office Bicycle.

Had several goes.

Desert Nomad
28th Jan 2006, 09:59
Ah but how many times did you fall off thinking that it'll never work. It's when something clicks that you worry, could be a serious injury...:rolleyes:

ExSimGuy
28th Jan 2006, 10:01
I actually learnt in Montclair, New Jersey, many miles from home. I fell so many times, it was daunting and I thought this would never work. Then, something clicked and the two wheeled world was beautiful. I learnt to drive a 747 in Heathrow, not many miles from home. I "fell" so many times, it was daunting and I thought this would never work. Then, something clicked and the aviation world was beautiful :eek:

Fortunately for BA's fleet of the time, it was at Cranebank at LHR and I never "fell" more than 10 feet:p

broadreach
28th Jan 2006, 11:29
Learned to ride a bike in Glenbrittle when I was five or six. The grass and sand were soft. Even better was helping Dad rebuild a dinghy, learning to row and taking the boat out by myself.

frostbite
28th Jan 2006, 12:22
I remember the school bike, but not her name.

G-CPTN
28th Jan 2006, 14:22
The one I referred to was known as Jennie Droppem (as opposed to Big Jennie - who was a good tall size 18).

Gainesy
28th Jan 2006, 15:52
Glenbrittle, where the grass and sand are soft. Like it.

Gouabafla
28th Jan 2006, 15:59
My dad died when I was eleven, and I don't have many memories of him. But I do remember him making blocks for the peddles on my new bike when I was seven or eight (it's a bit big now, but you'll grow into it son). How many times did he hold onto the saddle as I tried to ride down the back yard? How long did it take me to realise that he'd stopped holding onto the saddle and I was riding on my own?

G-CPTN
28th Jan 2006, 17:06
I too had wooden blocks made by my father for the pedals of my new bike (possibly my 11+ present - that would be 1955). I too had my father running behind (it was my first two-wheeler). As far as I know he's still there (can't remember when he stopped). I DO remember doing the same (running, not blocks) for my son, but he was MUCH younger than me, possibly 4 years old. His older sister had a two-wheeler and he was DETERMINED to learn (but afraid to 'solo') "Don't let go, Dad!" Of course I DID let go and off he went, then looked over his shoulder and did a wobbler (though didn't crash). Still got the photo (somewhere) taken 5 minutes later as a he did a fast low pass with a beaming smile wrapped around both ears. He's never looked back since! Now 'I' ride his bike (he lives in Central London) that I bought him in 1989 when we moved away from a dangerous house (on a narrow main road with no pavements and high hedges) that we'd moved to when he was 7. Bikes were banned on safety grounds. He DID use the 1989 bike at Uni though.

Shaggy Sheep Driver
28th Jan 2006, 17:09
Anyone wants to teach their children to ride a bike, here's how:

Remove the pedals.

Lower the saddle 'till their feet can be placed flat on the ground.

Let them scoot themselves along, like using a Hobby Horse.

They'll soon get the hang of 2-wheel balancing, and if they feel insecure they can always put their feet down - so no falling off at all with its attendant fear and loss of confidence.

Once they are OK with extended downhill 'feet up' rides, put the saddle up and the pedals on, and they'll be fine.

SSD

ExSimGuy
28th Jan 2006, 17:36
taking off the pedals I can understand - but what advantage is there in taking off the saddle - apart from the danger of the lottle sid doing him/herself a nasty injury :eek:

flapsforty
28th Jan 2006, 17:39
The lad next door abandoned his bike next to the sandbox one day. I 'borrowed' it when my Mum looked away, and when she looked back I was biking along like the clappers.
Or so my mother tells me.
When Dad got some money back from the taxman, they went to the bicycle shop down the street and bought me a shiny red bike with coloured tassles at the handlebars and a chrome bell. :ok:

It's my first childhood memory, I was 4 and the bike must have been tiny. But to me it was grown-up BIG and the prettiest shiniest fastest bike in the whole wide world.

kookabat
28th Jan 2006, 22:34
prettiest shiniest fastest bike in the whole wide world.

Thats cos it was RED!!!! ;)

Shaggy Sheep Driver
28th Jan 2006, 23:19
taking off the pedals I can understand - but what advantage is there in taking off the saddle - apart from the danger of the lottle sid doing him/herself a nasty injury :eek:

Can't you read!!!

LOWER THE SADDLE!! I said

I'll draw a picture for our more 'challenged' readers next time!

SSD

Send Clowns
28th Jan 2006, 23:48
I remember holding the saddle for my then-landlady's son, who had just turned 3. What a brilliant experience, like having a little boy of my own. remember letting go without telling heim, after a surprisingly short time. He learnt in an afternoon! Amazing, but the problem was he then used to disappear without telling anyone he was going :ooh:

BlueWolf
29th Jan 2006, 02:05
I never had trainer wheels, or a seat low enough that I could reach the ground. I learned to stay on by falling off, repeatedly, and I learned to mount, on the move, by scooting.

But once I had...I rode everywhere. I rode to high school and back every day for four years, 8 kms each way, in all weathers; I rode to work in Dorkland for two and a half years. I rode for fun. Man, I was a riding fool. No helmets, no reflective gear, no lycra racing pants; just rugby shorts and a tee-shirt and sunnies, and the wind in my hair and the blacktop under my touring gums.

And the cold and the wet and the burning sun, and the wind and the hills and the dangerously close traffic, and the potholes and the roadkill and the dorks chucking beer cans, were all part of the great experience. Yeah, those were the freedom years. I remember seeing that Canadian movie, "Breaking Away", and thinking, yeah, that's me, apart from the leg-shaving bit.

It was a romantic and sheltered time of life, and a beautiful relationship, just one teenage boy and his ten-speed bike.

Now, of course, I'm just another sad old tired fat [email protected] with a stack of memories and a dusty old bicycle parked in the shed.....but then again, I did discover aeroplanes in between:ok:

Loose rivets
29th Jan 2006, 03:34
Aaaaah....happy memories. His kid is too big for a little bike now.:D



http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v703/walnaze/Scottonsmallbike.jpg

RatherBeFlying
29th Jan 2006, 16:08
I was a late learner, 7 or 8, and suddenly it clicked while riding about the apartment complex patio. That was the only place I could take it because the only road was four lane highway. Once stuck in a Toronto suburb, the bike was the only way around and public transit was practically non-existent.

So now I'm biking 15km to work around the corner from where I lived in said godforsaken suburb (now quite the classy area) with studded tires after doing a 180 roll courtesy black ice:ouch:

The good part is a paved bike path up the valley for most of the distance which minimises exposure to the ever diminishing standard of driving:ok:

reynoldsno1
30th Jan 2006, 19:58
Decided to teach r1jr to ride a bike when she was about 5 - did all the running, holding the saddle, letting go bit. Useless, she fell off every time ....
6 months later, r1jr announced she wished to ride her bike now, please - took 5 minutes...

G-CPTN
30th Jan 2006, 20:24
Anybody ride a UNICYCLE?

DG101
30th Jan 2006, 21:33
This is a BI-cycle thread, G_CPTN. We'll thank you to keep your UNI fantasy to yourself

boguing
30th Jan 2006, 21:49
that you lot don't know why it needs 'that moment' to learn to ride a bike.

It's because you have to ignore the bit of brain that says "turn the handlebars right to turn right". Actually you turn them left to get your CofG to carry on straight and then right to stop yourself falling off.

Paracab
30th Jan 2006, 21:56
Learnt when I was four and many of my childhood memories consist of long hot summers constantly riding my bike. An area of our reasonably large back yard was rough concrete and I stacked it big style one day, shredding my right knee in the process.

Still got the scars 20 years on. Anyone else remember building ramps to jump over ? Tip: Do not build ramps anywhere near the washing line :uhoh: :{

Para Jnr has just had her stablisers removed and sucessfully solo'd at 5.