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Onan the Clumsy
30th Oct 2005, 01:28
Number 1: You're and Your

You're angry that your car got stolen.

You're is simply the contraction of You and are

your is the possesive form.

joe2812
30th Oct 2005, 01:39
Number 2:There , Their and they're

There is a ruddy ugly woman

'There' as is in a place

The inflatable cat is theirs

'Their' as in belonging to

They're two ruddy ugly women

'They're' is contraction of 'They' and 'Are'

TheFlyingSquirrel
30th Oct 2005, 01:49
Two - a number

too - excessively

to - something or other, i've forgotten !

Farrell
30th Oct 2005, 01:56
ALUMINIUM

pronounced... "AL-YOU-MIN-EE-UM"

allan907
30th Oct 2005, 03:05
Number 5 its and it's

it's A contraction of it and is It's time we got this right.

its possession. The dog wore its collar.

BlueDiamond
30th Oct 2005, 03:12
If you don't curb your enthusiasm for sitting on the kerb, a car might run over your feet.

The limn of the moon is the thin margin of light surrounding it. The moon does not have a limb (arm, leg etc.)

There is a median strip down the centre of the road, not a medium strip.

:E

kansasw
30th Oct 2005, 03:34
Oh Bluey, I am really sorry to tell you this, but the sun and moon are accurately spoken of as having limbs, just give it a google and you'll see. I suspect the terms date from the time of celestial navigation with sextants and whatnot, before GPS.

BlueDiamond
30th Oct 2005, 03:57
Don't be sorry, kansasw ... this is good debating stuff. :ok:

I believe it is a modern misuse that has been picked up by folk because limn is a word not often used and mistakenly interpreted as limb simply because they sound the same. And of course there will be many references if one does a web search, just as there will be plenty of results for curb when the user really means kerb. Frequency of use, however, doesn't make it correct.

planepsycho
30th Oct 2005, 04:01
hangar- a garage for airplanes
hanger- what your clothes are draped around in the closet

peace-what everyone in the world wants
piece- what everyone in the world wants

cribble
30th Oct 2005, 04:28
Lose: be unable to locate, having once had in one's posession

Loose: opposite of tight.:D

colmac747
30th Oct 2005, 05:17
Fool - to clown about

Full - to not clown about

:ugh:

Wholigan
30th Oct 2005, 05:19
oooooh a split infinitive -- oooh oooh teacher please sir --- he split an infinitive sir.........

:E

RiskyRossco
30th Oct 2005, 05:36
My, oh my.
S/body has stepped up to the plate, enfin.
Ainsi. . .

The verb is to have. Possessive.

I have.
You have
He/she has.
We have.
You (pl.) have.
They have.

Nowhere does 'to get', in either verb or past participle form, enter into the grammar of the possessive.
'To get' is an acquisitive verb, which means 'to acquire', where the direction of the thing is towards the possessor.
'To have' clearly denotes the thing already in possession, therefore one 'has'. Not 'has got'.

One did get s/thing, or got , or had got (past perfect). After the action of acquiring is finished the state of the thing acquired becomes 'possessed', ergo:
I have an idea. . . I have the keys. . . I have a new job. . .
So, why in the name of all that's holy do people still say "I've got" when they mean "I have". . . ???
Answer - popular usage, habit, amnesia and apathy. I continue the fight.

Farmer 1
30th Oct 2005, 05:54
So, who's right? In other words, whose answer is correct?

Strange beasts, possessive pronouns. To a man, they eschew the convention of using an apostrophe.

BlueDiamond
30th Oct 2005, 05:57
"Who" and "that."

The people who like music, not the people that like music.

The picture that hangs in the gallery.

henry crun
30th Oct 2005, 06:08
If you wish to express your agreement with someone the expression to use is
Hear Hear, not Here Here.

For Onan's edification,
Site: the place or setting of an event.
Sight: the faculty of vision.
:D

sprocket
30th Oct 2005, 06:09
The picture that hangs in the gallery.


But wait ... unless; of course the picture being referred to, is the young girl who was often said to be "as pretty as a picture" and had just committed suicide in the shooting gallery down sideshow alley .... then and only then the correct grammar would be "The picture who hangs in the gallery." :8

Farmer 1
30th Oct 2005, 06:19
then and only then the correct grammar would be "The picture who hangs in the gallery. I take that as a challenge.

The aforementioned young girl is employed in the art gallery. Her job? Hanging pictures. So, she's the picture who hangs in the gallery.

sprocket
30th Oct 2005, 06:22
Her job? Hanging pictures. So, she's the picture who hangs in the gallery

.... Aha! So then, is she a hanger, or a hangar?

Farmer 1
30th Oct 2005, 06:24
Now that's a tricky one.

Farrell
30th Oct 2005, 06:32
Taxi - a vehicle that you hire to take you somewhere.

Taxy - to manouver from the terminal to the runway.

Farmer 1
30th Oct 2005, 06:48
Beg to differ on that one, Mr F., and Mr Chambers agrees with me. You're not consulting with Mr Webster, are you?

From Chambers:tax'ying or tax'iing present participle; past tense and past participle That's the only mention of "taxy" in the dictionary, i.e. as a participle.

jon s gull
30th Oct 2005, 06:48
In OZ also


Loo's bathroom ammenities plural form

Lew's belonging to Lew (is that personal possesive)

Loose of flexible morals

Therefore ; Lew's loose girlfriend did lose more than her lunch in the loo's.

skaal Jon

Caslance
30th Oct 2005, 06:54
Number Whatever: Probably and Prolly

There is only one correct spelling: PROBABLY.

Deal with it.

Wingswinger
30th Oct 2005, 06:57
Taxy - to manouver from the terminal to the runway.

I'm sorry but I must disagree with this on two counts.

1. "Taxy" is an Americanism which has crept into the aviation lexicon in recent times. Consultation with the OED will reveal that it is "taxi".

2. It is "manouevre" not "manouver" - likewise an Americanism. The origin is French.

And now

Number 6

"The amount of people there..."

should be the number of people there.

People and identifiable objects en masse are a number. A pile of sand, gravel or leaves is an amount.

Likewise, fewer should be used instead of less .

"Fewer people attend nowadays" not "less people attend..."

And also:

The picture that hangs in the gallery

or "the picture which hangs in the gallery" which is possibly more correct. If you're really interested read Fowler. It Bores for Britain on the subject.

Just my hap'orth.

WS

BlueDiamond
30th Oct 2005, 07:21
Probably and Prolly
Errrm ... people write that as a sort of joke, Caslance. :rolleyes:

It's like writing "fer" goodness sake or "gizza" look. I'm sure nobody actually thinks it is spelled that way.

And now, a perennial favourite ...

"Could of" instead of "could have".

I could of caught the bus, instead of I could have caught the bus.

Farmer 1
30th Oct 2005, 07:25
"One out of ten people don't know how to spell properly."

"Oh, don't he?"

Binoculars
30th Oct 2005, 07:35
Well, in 25 posts so far on this thread, I count nine mistakes, including four in one post alone. Three separate posters, including the originator of the thread, :E err in their spelling of "possession" or its derivatives.

Pots, kettles and the perils of hurling rocks in buildings made of glass all come to mind. It's a very good idea to preview your post on this thread rather more thoroughly than usual, methinks.
:8

BlueDiamond
30th Oct 2005, 07:43
Their prolly just typo's, Bino's. :E

Farmer 1
30th Oct 2005, 07:44
I'll bet you previewed that post an inordinately long time, Bins.

Papa Charlie
30th Oct 2005, 07:44
The boy took a bow.
The buoy was placed on a bough.

:ooh:

Binoculars
30th Oct 2005, 07:49
You are absolutely correct, Farmer, to the point where the 25 posts I quoted had become 27 by the time I hit "Submit"!

Whirlygig
30th Oct 2005, 07:52
Infer and Imply

I can infer something from what you've said.

I believe you implied it.

Cheers

Whirls

Farmer 1
30th Oct 2005, 07:52
Bins, we are of like minds.

BombayDuck
30th Oct 2005, 08:44
"I would of"

v/s

"I would've"

er... i mean "I would have"

:E

2 sheds
30th Oct 2005, 08:46
"If the administrator has selected to moderate all posts in this forum..."

"elected", perhaps??

ChampChump
30th Oct 2005, 08:54
"Off of".

'Off' and 'from' cover most eventualities...

Incipient Sinner
30th Oct 2005, 09:18
Don't get me started...

The statement "I'll be with you momentarily" always begs the question "What will you be doing after that?"

and another thing...

The checkout should NOT have a sign reading "10 items or less ". What's wrong with "10 items only please".

Rant over:D

Wingswinger
30th Oct 2005, 09:22
Like wise "outside of" as in "outside of the UK" It's a double preposition unless prefixed by "on the" as in " on the outside of the house" in which case "outside" is an abstract noun. Simply "outside" will do.

In other contexts, "apart from", "aside from" or "except". Anything but "outside of" which grates. Besides, it's an Americanism so it belongs in America, not here.

DeBurcs
30th Oct 2005, 09:22
I know it's a 'grammar' thread, not a 'spelling' thread but more than a few D&G punters need to know that:

Looser - is your jocks are after the rubber band has perished.

Looser - is what dumb people call other dumb people.

Wingswinger
30th Oct 2005, 09:25
IS

The trouble with "ten items only"is obvious. "Ten items or fewer" would be better.

cavortingcheetah
30th Oct 2005, 09:26
:p


http://www.maxwellhouse.com/maxwellhouse/page

Good to the last drop.

What might be wrong with that last drop ?

Shall I be hanged or shall I be hung? There's a thought.
I would prefer, on balance, to be hung rather than hanged.
For a better understanding of the subjunctive tenses, read Shakespeare. Whoever wrote his verse and prose.
Be careful lest you intersperse your witty words with litotes.;)

Fewer is usually used with plural nouns. eg: Fewer books.
In the previous supermarket example. 'Less than eleven items'.
might be even more correct?

tart1
30th Oct 2005, 09:34
Well-hung maybe, CC?? :E

Binoculars
30th Oct 2005, 09:43
Check your PM's

B Fraser
30th Oct 2005, 10:05
Gotten:yuk:

Could our transAtlantic chums please try using words such as obtained, received, acquired, fetched, took, was given, bought, collected, selected, purchased, procured or as a last resort ..... "got".

DeBurcs
30th Oct 2005, 10:13
Add this thread to your favorites...

Gordon Fraser
30th Oct 2005, 10:29
WingsS
Or - "No more than ten items"

tart1
30th Oct 2005, 10:34
Nobody takes any notice of the '10 items' rule anyway. :D

Romeo Charlie
30th Oct 2005, 10:36
The easiest way to tell whether 'less' or 'fewer' should be employed is that 'less' applies to singular items whereas 'fewer' applies to plural items.

Thus 'less money, fewer monies'.

diginagain
30th Oct 2005, 10:45
Please feel free to correct me if I am wrong (as I'm certain you will), but doesn't the expression 'one of the only......' seem incongruous?

Surely the inclusion of the word 'only' implies the singular?

I await your response.

(Took me an age to pick my way through what I wished to say, lest sufficient ammunition provide I).

Wingswinger
30th Oct 2005, 10:48
RE: Gotten

Actually, this is an archaic participle which has all but died out in British English except where it is preserved in compounds such as "forgotten" or "begotten". Shakespeare used it often and American English has kept it alive.

anoxic
30th Oct 2005, 11:25
Confusing these confuses me!

Affected and effected.

Insure, assure and ensure.

Reading a Boeing manual that tells me to assure a switch position is beyond me. How? Be nice to it?

While I'm at it:-

less = not so big
fewer = not so many

effortless
30th Oct 2005, 11:30
Hyper-urbanisms such as "I" instead of "me" as in "He hit Jenny and I" when it should be "He hit Jenny and me."

Noah Zark.
30th Oct 2005, 11:54
And what of that televisual feast, Dr. Who?
Dr.Whom, surely.
The only thing wrong with my grammar is that she's dead!

Incipient Sinner
30th Oct 2005, 11:56
Wingswinger,

You're quite right, I sit corrected. How could I even think of going to the '10 items only' counter with 7 items!!

Should I be writing to my local Tescos manager (and no, Tescos doesn't have an apostrophe)?

:ok: Proud pedants unite:ok:

Anoxic. If you post, better make it right.

Less: Not as much.
Fewer: Not as many.

Binoculars
30th Oct 2005, 12:00
Since the thread originator himself professed confusion on the difference between affect and effect and it's now been raised again, let's clear it up since it's simple and unambiguous.

Affect = Verb
Effect = Noun.

(Stands back and awaits the inevitable exceptions).

airship
30th Oct 2005, 12:04
I never new my gramma. Or grampa neither. :{

Farmer 1
30th Oct 2005, 12:36
Somebody mentioned prepositions, those things with which a sentence should never be finished. So, if you are allowed to be ungrammatical for one sentence, how many prepositions can you think of with which to finish it?

How about:

When Captain Cook was strutting his stuff on the South Seas, one of his officers asked him what his plans were. He replied, "I'm about off back up to Down Under." (Makes perfect sense if you're a Yorkshireman.)

I make that seven, and I reckon I could possibly add another, maybe with just a teensy bit of cheating. Anyone else?

Whirlygig
30th Oct 2005, 12:48
Ending a sentence with a preposition is an error up with which I shall not put!

Cheers

Whirls

Farmer 1
30th Oct 2005, 12:50
Bins,

(Stands back and awaits the inevitable exceptions). Gotcha!

Effect (Chambers):verb transitive to produce; to accomplish or bring about. I won't mention the full stop, either.

Onan the Clumsy
30th Oct 2005, 12:51
Thankyou Binos

and btw, my spelling is this


:8

BlueDiamond
30th Oct 2005, 12:55
Walking briskly along the footpath, a car nearly ran me over.

Dangling participle, anyone? :E

Binoculars
30th Oct 2005, 12:58
Bugger. I knew there was something gnawing at my mind that said "think a bit longer about this before you post it". :{

Full stops don't count. :}

Onan the Clumsy
30th Oct 2005, 13:01
Back in England, I had a girlfriend who would occasionally miss her full stops.

Of course she bothered me less than my American girlfriend...

Binoculars
30th Oct 2005, 13:09
I should of quit this thred while I was ahead. What a looser. :{

...but just between you and I.......

effortless
30th Oct 2005, 13:12
I sometimes affect that I effect some change in my affect. This of course has no effect on my affect.

Farmer 1
30th Oct 2005, 13:24
As has been pointed out before on this thread, there are still many, many people who cannot spell a perfectly normal, simple, everyday word correctly. In this day and age, computers and all, there is just no excuse - use the spellchecker, for goodness's sake!

It really is pathetic, and I am so moved by it all I've been inspired to compose a short poem. Well, actually, I was given it.



OWED TWO A SPELL CHEQUER

Eye halve a Spelling Chequer.
It came with my pea sea.
It plane lea marques four my revue
Miss steaks eye kin knot sea.

Aye strike a quay and type a word
And weight four it two say
Weather eye am wrong oar write
It shows me strait a weigh

As soon as a mist ache is maid
It nose bee four two long
An dye can put the error rite,
Its rare lee ever wrong.

Eye halve run this poem threw it,
I am shore your pleased two no.
Its letter perfect awl the weigh
My chequer tolled me sew.

Binoculars
30th Oct 2005, 13:26
Hmmm, let's not get too precious here, effortless. Your first use of affect is still a verb, if of a different meaning. Farmer1 beat you to the use of effect as a verb, and your double use of the noun affect is at best tenuous. Dictionary references are usually qualified by "obsolete" or something similar. The only modern usage any of them seem to be able to come up with is by Norman Mailer. :uhoh:

And Farmer1, since pedantry is now the name of the game, I'm sure you won't be surprised to learn how many times that piece has been run on Pprune; at least once by yours truly!

Onan the Clumsy
30th Oct 2005, 13:34
P = Participle found dalgling under #2 engine
M =

Farmer 1
30th Oct 2005, 13:34
Actually, Bins, I am surprised; I haven't seen it posted before. For a moment, I was tempted to delete it, but it's still not a bad poem if you've never seen it before. And if I did, it would make your post a nonsense, which would be ungallant of me.

Touché.

Binoculars
30th Oct 2005, 13:39
You are quite correct, Farmer. It is so good that I actually had it printed out and put above my 486 DX2-66 computer many moons ago so the Binoettes could absorb the message.

You're also correct that if everything that was repeated on Pprune were deleted the site would be half the size it is. It was yet another cheap shot by me, desperately looking to get back on the front foot and still smarting from my stupidity at not remembering the transitive verb usage of effect before posting. :(

I'm like that sometimes, but I always appreciate gallantry. :ok:

(quickly edited to include a subjunctive, which I would only ever think about on this thread).

Spuds McKenzie
30th Oct 2005, 13:52
The bird flu

The bird flew

:hmm:

Farmer 1
30th Oct 2005, 13:57
Bins, I was being gallant, you understand?

allan907
30th Oct 2005, 14:55
I take it you already know
Of tough and bough and cough and dough.
Others may stumble, but not you,
On hiccough, thorough, laugh and through.
Well done! And now you wish, perhaps,
To learn of less familiar traps.

Beware of heard, a dreadful word,
That looks like heard and sounds like bird;
And dead: it's said like bed and not like bead.
For goodness sake don't call it deed.
Watch out for meat and great and threat;
They rhyme with suite and straight and debt.

A moth is not a moth in mother,
Nor both in bother, broth in brother;
And here is not a match for there.
Nor dear and fear for bear and pear.
And then there's dose and rose and lose -
Just look them up - and goose and choose,
And cork abnd work and cord and ward,
And font and front and word and sword,
And do and go and thwart and cart.

Come, come, I've hardly made a start!
A dreadful language???
Man alive!
I'd mastered it when I was five!


frontispiece to the Joint Services Command and Staff College English Reference Book - for which I am ever grateful

barit1
30th Oct 2005, 14:58
Medium / media
datum / data
bacterium / bacteria
ad inf.


:D

Onan the Clumsy
30th Oct 2005, 15:00
ad sing, / ad inf.

Farmer 1
30th Oct 2005, 15:04
More latin plurals?

Stadia
Fora
Ra
Ba

anoxic
30th Oct 2005, 15:17
Farmer 1

Mor = a big awkward girl

Mora (plural?) = the game of guessing how many fingers are held up

(hopefully, not up the same big awkward girl)

[Ah .. you edited it!]

Farmer 1
30th Oct 2005, 15:22
Well spotted, Anoxic. Yes, I just beat you to it - phew! I must try harder next time.

anoxic
30th Oct 2005, 15:28
I would have beaten you but I had to check things so carefully on this thread!

Ah! Seoul!
30th Oct 2005, 15:35
Time for my two pet peeves, much abused by so-called professional users of the English language (BBC and CBC, are you paying attention?)



Disect

There is no such word.

Do you mean dissect (dis-sect - cut into pieces - no number specified) or bisect (bi-sect - cut into two parts)?



Defuse/Diffuse

As used, oh, so frequently, in comments like "The Police diffused the situation"

Did they really spread the situation about? Or did they de-fuse the situation? I suspect the latter.



I blame the Americans. I really do. And, this once, not just Dubya, either.

effortless
30th Oct 2005, 15:43
Affect and Effect are both verbs and nouns. Affect can mean emotional arousal, as in "One of the symptoms of depression is loss of affect."

It is a verb as in " He affects to be.." that is "He puts on the air of..."

2 sheds
30th Oct 2005, 15:57
I notice on the ASTAC (Rudloe College) website:

"All The Other News Story's"

Aa-a-argh! Get a grip, chaps, it does not create the right company image.

B Fraser
30th Oct 2005, 16:06
RE: Gotten .... Actually, this is an archaic participle which has all but died out in British English except where it is preserved in compounds such as "forgotten" or "begotten". Shakespeare used it often and American English has kept it alive.

Perhaps a redneck cousin from Birmingham Alabama wrote a few lines of Macbeth while visiting the Brummie Bard :}

Farmer 1
30th Oct 2005, 16:16
Re Rudloe:

That's terrible. There are typographical errors, there are spelling errors, and then there are those errors made by people without the benefit of an education in the English language. It seems at least one of the latter works at Rudloe.

patdavies
30th Oct 2005, 16:18
NONE

Always takes a singular verb, as in "''none of them has..."

This one is easy to remember if you substitute 'not one' or 'not any' for the occurrence of 'none'.

frostbite
30th Oct 2005, 17:23
Not mentioned thus far....

Why do so many people make such a mess out of spelling 'tongue' ?

Davaar
30th Oct 2005, 17:42
Not all grammatical; one or two are usages:

1. "if anyONE offends [etc] THEY will be punished".

2. "We'll send it to forensics". No, you fool, you will not. You will send it to the forensic laboratory, that laboratory that busies itself in forensic matters. On its own, "We'll send it to forensics" could equally well mean "We'll send it to the lawyers".

3. "Is he a cop or a civilian". A cop IS a civilian. He is governed by civil law, not military law.

innuendo
30th Oct 2005, 18:42
The uses of,
insure,
ensure,
and assure.

barit1
30th Oct 2005, 21:10
There are typographical errors, there are spelling errors, and then there are those errors made by people without the benefit of an education in the English language.

But a homophonic substitution is neither of the first two, and a correctly-spelled homophone will slip right past your speilchecker.

Ahem - ah yes the media. But that's what J-school is for - so they learn how to properly misuse & mangle the language.

And how to aim a microphone at you as they ask "How does it make you feel that your wife & kids were killed today?"

It's a wonder more of them don't suffered on-the-job trauma.

PileUp Officer
30th Oct 2005, 21:35
I take it you already know Of tough and bough and cough and dough. Others may stumble, but not you, On hiccough, thorough, laugh and through. Well done! And now you wish, perhaps, To learn of less familiar traps. Beware of heard, a dreadful word, That looks like heard and sounds like bird; And dead: it's said like bed and not like bead. For goodness sake don't call it deed. Watch out for meat and great and threat; They rhyme with suite and straight and debt. A moth is not a moth in mother, Nor both in bother, broth in brother; And here is not a match for there. Nor dear and fear for bear and pear. And then there's dose and rose and lose - Just look them up - and goose and choose, And cork abnd work and cord and ward, And font and front and word and sword, And do and go and thwart and cart. Come, come, I've hardly made a start! A dreadful language??? Man alive! I'd mastered it when I was five! frontispiece to the Joint Services Command and Staff College English Reference Book - for which I am ever grateful

A friend of mine had read that out at IOT and kept mispronouncing all the words. It made me laugh my head off! :O :D

Farmer 1
31st Oct 2005, 05:34
Barit1,

Ah, yes, the media. I understand it's their golden rule - to never split an infinitive.

jon s gull
31st Oct 2005, 06:42
Perhaps this panel of experts would care to settle a long dispute twixt my father (may he rest in peace) and I. He always used utilise where I would have utilised use.He may well still be following this forum from his new domain.
salute'

RiskyRossco
31st Oct 2005, 07:34
The rule is, 'Never use a big one when a small one will do'.
Unless your audience expects it. Generally, in official or business correspondence, complicated or large words are frowned upon and can be a detriment to the writer's ultimate goal.
Depending on the effect or context I'd 'use' or 'utilise'. But a drug addict would probably not have the concentration to get out 'utiliser'. . . :hmm:

Anyhoo, on another tack.

Just. a. true, acting agreeably to right, or law, or engagement, impartial, righteous, faithful, agreeable to what is due, or proper, or proportionate, merited, deserved.

Compare - "I was just going out". . "I was just here a moment ago". . . "he was just joking". . ."just in the nick of time". . .

Here's a simple tip, for those who haven't bothered to remember their education, or pick up the dictionary in years. It is this.
Omit from your sentence what appears to be an extraneous or redundant word; if the sentence makes sense still, or in fact is improved, leave the blasted word out and don't ever use it again.
:hmm:

Takan Inchovit
31st Oct 2005, 08:57
:( I dont have a gramma, she passed away before I wuz born.:(

Farmer 1
31st Oct 2005, 09:15
The rule is, 'Never use a big one when a small one will do'. I said exactly the same thing the other day to the meteorological prognosticators.

WeatherJinx
31st Oct 2005, 09:22
Jinx's annoyance du jour - Brits that say 'can I get....?' instead of 'may I have....?' in coffee shops and the like. Too much 'Friends'? Or too many? ;) Mind you, I'm half expecting some wag to point out that both are incorrect! :p

VitaminGee
31st Oct 2005, 10:18
Sticky usually describes something that has a tendency to adhere to another object. Would it also be correct to use the word sticky to descibe someone, or something, that has an appearance similar to a stick (opposite of bushy for instance)?
Was it wishful thinking by Onan to include the word sticky in the title to this thread?:E

VG

Farmer 1
31st Oct 2005, 12:50
Yes, indeed, hence the answer to the question, what's brown and sticky?

A stick.

Stockpicker
31st Oct 2005, 13:34
I obtained rhythm
I received music
I acquired my girl
Who could ask for anything more?

I fetched daisies
In green pastures
I took my girl
Who could ask for anything more?

Old man trouble?
I don't mind him
You won't find him
Round my door

I was given starlight
I bought sweet dreams
I collected my girl
Who could ask for anything more?

Hmmmm ..... doesn't seem quite the same. Maybe it needs Gene Kelly and a bunch of winsome American faux-Parisian children?

:E

frostbite
31st Oct 2005, 14:40
Another common one that grates is 'Here, here' instead of 'Hear, hear'.

flapsforty
31st Oct 2005, 14:45
Another common one that grates is people not taking the time to read a thread but still posting on it and then repeating something that has been said already. ;)

MacApple
31st Oct 2005, 15:39
'Ear, 'ear, F40!!

And so to summarise:

GUIDE TO AUTHORS

Make sure each pronoun agrees with their antecedent.
Just between you and I, the case of pronouns is important.
Watch out for irregular verbs which have crope into English.
Verbs has to agree in number with their subjects.
Don't use no double negatives.
Being bad grammar, a writer should not use dangling modifiers.
Join clauses good like a conjunction should.
A writer must not shift your point of view.
About sentence fragments.
Don't use run-on sentences you got to punctuate them.
In letters essays and reports use commas to separate items in series.
Don't use commas, which are not necessary.
Parenthetical words however should be enclosed in commas.
Its important to use apostrophes right in everybodys writing.
Don't abbrev.
Check to see if you any words out.
Check to see that jargonwise, it's A-OK.
As far as incomplete constructions, they are wrong.
About repetition, the repetition of a word might be real effective repetition
-- take, for instance, the repetition of Abraham Lincoln.
In my opinion, I think that an author when he is writing should definitely not
get into the habit of making use of too many unnecessary words that he does
not really need in order to put his message across.
Use parallel construction not only to be concise but also to clarify.
It behooves us all to avoid archaic expressions.
Mixed metaphors are a pain in the neck and ought to be weeded out.
Consult the dictionery to avoid mispelings.
To ignorantly split an infinitive is a practice to religiously avoid.
Last but not least, lay off clichés.