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Grainger
28th Sep 2005, 11:33
An 11-year-old boy who was caught behind the wheel of a BMW has been disqualified from driving for a year. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/hampshire/4289930.stm

OK, we really are in world gone mad. We lock up pensioners, yet this lad - who could have killed someone - is given what amounts to a non-punishment !! Disqualified from something he's already not allowed to do !

WTF is going on ?

It gets even more comical:
. . . chairman of the bench, Esther MacDonald, imposed three penalty points for driving without a licence and six penalty points for driving without insurance. How can they give him points when he hasn't even got a smegging licence !

Biggles Flies Undone
28th Sep 2005, 11:36
Sentencing him on Wednesday, Mrs MacDonald said: "If you break any of the terms of the order we will bring you back to court and we can punish you in a different way."

What, like confiscate his conkers and pocket money? :hmm:

Binoculars
28th Sep 2005, 11:48
Disqualified him for a year> Until he's 12? You mean he can drive then? :confused:

lexxity
28th Sep 2005, 11:52
When he was caught, the boy claimed he owned the car, did not realise he needed a licence and that he knew how to drive.

:eek: How does an 11year old get the money for a BMW? Do you think he teaches martial arts?

Dak Mechanic
28th Sep 2005, 11:54
One would hope that IF the little scrote survives to 17 (and I for one hopes that he will not) he will be banned from that point and suffer the 6 points and extended driving test that results.

If this isn't the case then the magistrate needs locking up as well.

JC

C130 Techie
28th Sep 2005, 12:04
11 years old............

In keeping with the mental age of most BMW drivers then. (Sorry Dave):E :E

Groundloop
28th Sep 2005, 12:05
"How does an 11year old get the money for a BMW?"

If this is the 11 year old I think it is , he swopped his motorised skooter with some bloke he met in the street for the BMW.

ORAC
28th Sep 2005, 12:14
If you're under age or don't have a licence, a record is created at DVLA with these endorsement points noted so that if, and when, you apply for a licence the endorsements will be recorded on your licence at the time of issue.

The penalty points are, therefore, applied at the time of conviction whether you have a licence or not.

Mariner9
28th Sep 2005, 12:14
Really isn't fair to blame the Magistrates who are constrained by sentencing guidelines. Presumably the motoring offences comitted were only punishable by motoring-related sanctions.

Would be interested to hear the views on here if said "Scrote" had been fined 50 and refused to pay....

tony draper
28th Sep 2005, 12:20
Behead the little fecker!
:E

CWL2YOW
28th Sep 2005, 12:24
Don't forget to read the whole article, folks...

The boy, who has behavioural and learning disabilities, pleaded guilty to driving without due care and attention, driving without a licence and driving without insurance at an earlier hearing.

It doesn't make his actions right, but this may go some way towards explaining why he acted in this way.

BleriotXI
28th Sep 2005, 12:28
One would hope that IF the little scrote survives to 17 (and I for one hopes that he will not)

Behead the little fecker!


Wow... the things you wish for this kid to happen... thank god he's not a cat or this thread would have been swamped with angry cat lovers.

C130 Techie
28th Sep 2005, 12:31
The boy, who has behavioural and learning disabilities, pleaded guilty to driving without due care and attention, driving without a licence and driving without insurance at an earlier hearing.

If these problems mean that he is capable of doing something as dangerous as this then why isn't he under constant supervision.

419
28th Sep 2005, 12:37
thank god he's not a cat or this thread would have been swamped with angry cat lovers.

But, then again, don't forget that there aren't any cats that I am aware of, who are capable of driving a lethal weapon (without insurance), who could quite possibly wipe out an entire family in a crash.

Whirlygig
28th Sep 2005, 12:37
The boy, who has behavioural and learning disabilities
Nothing that a couple of rounds with Joe Bugner wouldn't cure! Just sounds like a modern term for being thick and naughty!

I'm sorry and I'm normally cute and cuddly and PC and all that but... "behavioural and learning disabilities" is getting used as an excuse far too often. By the age of 11, a child should have learned the difference between right and wrong if they were taught it in the first place. Let's face it, a child should know the difference between right and wrong long before the age of 11.

Cheers

Whirls



Better go and hug a tree before I come over all Tory-minded!

tacpot
28th Sep 2005, 13:46
Behavioural disabilities = PC for Naughty ! (I hate political correctness!)

Learning disabilities = finds it difficult to learn new stuff, e.g. that actions can have a consequence, so perhaps not all his own fault...

But banning him does not give him any consequences anyway, so even a kid without learning disabilites would struggle to make the connection! Suggest the court fines the parents and makes arrangements for the parents to recover the cash from the kid, by making the fecker work. That way he might just connect that action a = consequence b. And repeat until learning disability is overcome!

Mariner9
28th Sep 2005, 13:48
Perhaps he was going to visit his pregnant girlfriend ;)

teeteringhead
28th Sep 2005, 14:00
there aren't any cats that I am aware of, who are capable of driving ... that can only be because they don't want to ....;)

Curious Pax
28th Sep 2005, 14:04
Interesting to note that some of the same folks who were recounting 'boys will be boys' stories about things ballistic from their childhood a few days ago are now demanding violent punishment on some kid doing the modern equivalent now!

No idea in this case, as I've no doubt that the 'learning disabilities' tag is sometimes misused, but used to live next to a 16 year old girl who legitimately had it. She definitely wasn't thick, but her literary skills were 4-5 years behind. Despite that she worked hard and got a job in a nursery when she left school which she had always wanted to do. Talking to her parents, the thing that concerned them most was that the problem made her very trusting of other people. No idea if this is relevant to the case in question, but if the bit about him swapping his motorised bike for a BMW is true, then he may well have taken the other person's word for it that it was an OK thing to do.

Despite all that, he could of course still be a scrote......

Grainger
28th Sep 2005, 14:24
. . .if the bit about him swapping his motorised bike for a BMW is true . . . True ? Load of hogwash more like ! I mean, he's hardly likely to say that he nicked it, is he ?

Although these news stories are often more interesting for what's left out rather than what's said. Where did the car come from ? Did the police trace the registered owner, or what ?

henry crun
28th Sep 2005, 21:46
Learning disabilities, obviously doesn't apply to learning how to drive.

Mr Chips
28th Sep 2005, 23:40
ok, at the risk of damaging my Daily mail Reading credentials...

there is such a thing as "behavioural and learning difficulties". Would you prefer to label this child as Moderately Mentally Handicapped? i spent many of my summers working with these kinds of young people. (Not driving though)

I THINK that by banning the offender, it opens up more sentencing opportunities next time, or possibly, they have effectively told the offender it is actually wrong, and he must not do it again...

But lets just hang him anyway and ignore his disabilities

Send Clowns
28th Sep 2005, 23:56
I have known people with learning disabilities, some very well; I have even taught them (not aviation-related - I used to teach in kayaks) and had one up for a trial lesson. They knew right from wrong, that was never a problem for any of them, so I am suspiscious of this assessment. In fact all knew what was right more than many more 'able' kids. However we here don't know the circumstances. I would like to have met this boy before making a judgement. I suggest some here consider that too.

guccigal
29th Sep 2005, 00:22
"Behavioural and Learning Disorders/Disabilities"

This umbrella term can refer to a number of different developmental problems. It can range from things like dyslexia, and specific learning disorders related to spelling, arithmetic etc to more serious problems such as Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Asperger's, ADHD, and even Childhood Schizophrenia.

The use of the term "Behavioural and Learning Disabilities" may indicate this child sufffers from more than one problem and these conditions vary in their severity.