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View Full Version : How much of a geek are you?


Bre901
28th Sep 2005, 09:19
Answer here (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/4287006.stm)
You got 10 right!
Excellent, you have the makings of a proper propeller head. :8 :8 :8 :8 :8 :rolleyes:

Whirlygig
28th Sep 2005, 09:30
I got 10 out of 10 too!! They weren't difficult though!

For an extra mark - what's the difference between a geek and a nerd?

Cheers

Whirls

PerArdua
28th Sep 2005, 09:31
You got 9 right!
Excellent, you have the makings of a proper propeller head.

Still room for improvement then!!!

PA

IFTB
28th Sep 2005, 09:31
Where does RSS stand for?
"Rubbish Silly System"
:} :} :ok:

(9 BTW)

SpinSpinSugar
28th Sep 2005, 09:52
<ANORAK>


How many colours in the VGA display standard?

A: 24 million
B: None, you've made it up
C: 16

The answer was C

I thought it was...

CGA 4
EGA 16
VGA 256

:confused:

</ANORAK>

under_exposed
28th Sep 2005, 10:00
16 colors at 640 x 480 or 256 colors at 320 x 200

SpinSpinSugar
28th Sep 2005, 10:09
Cheers!

I used to have a CGA machine.

Twin 5.25" drives too, I'll have you know (but no "Winchester").

Regards, SSS

under_exposed
28th Sep 2005, 10:45
Sounds a bit like my old work Olivetti M240. That was a fast machine, 10mhz!

SpinSpinSugar
28th Sep 2005, 10:56
Ah yes, the days when machines came with "Turbo" buttons to take them from 8Mhz to 16Mhz.

:)

Avtrician
28th Sep 2005, 11:08
You got 7 right!
Good work, but you need to try harder to embrace your inner geek.

Theres hope for me yet (could have got 10, but dont want to look like a geek)

under_exposed
28th Sep 2005, 11:08
Things went downhill when you could no longer fit your OS, application and data all on the one 360k floppy.
I still have an 8" floppy.

The SSK
28th Sep 2005, 11:12
I'm as un-geeky as they come but I did once write a program in APL to play Jotto.

Come to that, I even know what APL stands for.

Whirlygig
28th Sep 2005, 11:14
I still have an 8" floppy.
I'm impressed :O

Who remembers the PDP11 (shared a house with aguy who had one in his room!) and the VAX 11/780!

Cheers

Whirls

Bre901
28th Sep 2005, 11:29
Who remembers the PDP11 (shared a house with aguy who had one in his room!) and the VAX 11/780! Me, but I shouldn't brag too much about it as it gives a strong clue about my age.

Strangely, I'm currently working on a Powerpoint presentation which includes this picture :
http://www.crowl.org/Lawrence/history/dec_vax780.full.jpg
There is a slide charting some historical view of computing at our facility and it does start with a VAX 11-780.
I could tell you what we use nowadays, but I'd have to kill you afterwards.:suspect: :suspect:
repeatdly edited for crapy speling, must be the bronchitis

under_exposed
28th Sep 2005, 11:33
I used to have a data general nova 4, similar to this one. (http://www.wps.com/NOVA4/images/rackfront3.jpg)

Bre901
28th Sep 2005, 11:35
Bah, when I started programing, we didn't need no shtinkin' magtapes and hard disks, we used punchcards :rolleyes:

Whirlygig
28th Sep 2005, 11:48
under_exposed - it's just not the same if your pictures are in colour! We want 60s B&W, we want the Commodore Pet, we want punched tape that was used as Christmas Garlands....

airship - I wouldn't worry! I think I've given my own age away as well!

Cheers

Whirls

under_exposed
28th Sep 2005, 11:56
Bre, When I wur a lad I used t get up in the mornin and enter the boot strap sequence from memory into the switches

(No, I am not really that old!)

Bre901
28th Sep 2005, 12:03
Whirls airship - I wouldn't worry! I think I've given my own age away as well!I'm not aware airship posted on that thread. :confused: :confused: so this must be addressed to me but I have to assure you that airship and Bre901 are different persons


u_e enter the boot strap sequence from memory into the switchesOld enough to actually see some people do it ... (same beast that used to be fed with above mentionned punchcards)

Whirlygig
28th Sep 2005, 12:06
Sorry Bre; bit of a mind [email protected] - must be me age!!

Cheers

Whirls

lexxity
28th Sep 2005, 12:09
You got 8 right!
Excellent, you have the makings of a proper propeller head.


:hmm:

seacue
28th Sep 2005, 13:00
I built my own personal computer in 1970. It used the PDP-8 instruction set and used paper tape for removable storage.

The first IBM PCs and their look-alikes ran at 4.77 MHz. When "Turbo" came along it allowed switching to something faster - maybe 7 MHz.

The Intel 8008 instruction set was created by Victor Poor of Frederick, MD, USA, under contract to Datapoint. The 8008 was too slow so Datapoint implemented the instruction set in 7400-series LSI. The Datapoint 2200 may well have be the first serious business personal computer. It had integral keyboard, CRT and dual Philips cassettes.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datapoint
Poor became Datapoint's chief engineer.

The 8008 became the core of the 8080 instruction set. Blame it on Vic. But there is a somewhat different view from Ted Hoff. http://www.stanford.edu/group/mmdd/SiliconValley/SiliconGenesis/TedHoff/Hoff.html

Poor's ham call is now W5SMM.

under_exposed
28th Sep 2005, 13:04
Not sure if it was down to my email but question 2 now corrected.

Conan the Librarian
28th Sep 2005, 13:22
Another full blown 10 star Geek here. Better get me anorak then...

Conan