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View Full Version : Wine Bottles... are they getting harder to open?


topcat450
31st Aug 2005, 23:07
I think they are... in the olden days with proper corks they were relatively easy and satisfying to open.

These new-fangled rubber thingies seem a lot tougher to get out.

Not a good look when you're trying to look suave in front of the fairer sex and have to bust a blood vessel opening a bottle of plonk for her.

And before some bright spark suggests I stick to champagne.. you can **** off! :} :ok: She wasn't that special.

tart1
31st Aug 2005, 23:07
Get the woman to do it!!

I am excellent at opening bottles of wine!! :D

rubik101
31st Aug 2005, 23:11
Just unscrew it like what I do.

tart1
31st Aug 2005, 23:12
I thought it was screwing you were best at! ;) ;)

rubik101
31st Aug 2005, 23:21
And pray tell how would you know that? Are you assuming that because I open wine with my fingers rather than some mechanical device I am an expert at screwing? Actually, you might be right.

tart1
31st Aug 2005, 23:22
I am guessing that you are quite keen on mechanical devices as a rule.

Right??:D

rubik101
31st Aug 2005, 23:25
I don't use my tool as a rule but I do use my unscrewing hand to good effect sometimes. So I have been told by those who appreciate a good wine!

Conan the Librarian
1st Sep 2005, 00:22
A good whine? Here? Jetblast? Noooooooo.....


Conan

con-pilot
1st Sep 2005, 04:31
No, just remember that practice makes perfect!:ok:

Rollingthunder
1st Sep 2005, 04:38
There are cork pullers with levers for the arm strength challenged.

I find the plastic corks pull out cleaner than the corks. Save a cork tree.

ORAC
1st Sep 2005, 07:02
The opposite Rollingthunder. Plastic stoppers and killing the cork forests. See here (http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m2465/is_8_30/ai_67448418). You should use cork.

Unwell_Raptor
1st Sep 2005, 09:22
I find that the third bottle is somehow harder to open than the first.

phoenix son
1st Sep 2005, 09:33
One understands it's all in the wrist Mr TC...And therefore you should surely have no problems...:E

newswatcher
1st Sep 2005, 09:49
What's really irritating is to buy one of those "levered" devices, only to find in the "small print" that it says - "do not to use with plastic corks"!

Sadly, such corks seem to proliferate at the low-cost end of the market!
:mad:

Blacksheep
1st Sep 2005, 10:02
You're so right Unwell_Raptor, by the fifth I find it easier to smash the neck off against the edge of the table...

Solid Rust Twotter
1st Sep 2005, 10:03
This only works with champagne...

Give the bottle a really good shake to mix the goodness in and the cork comes out easy as pie.:ok:


Always wanted to try that sword thing, though. Problem is, with my lack of coordination I'd probably skewer a bystander.

henry crun
1st Sep 2005, 10:07
Change to screw caps, you know it makes sense.

Stockpicker
1st Sep 2005, 10:16
We've got one of those lever thingies, and it's brill - really quick, and quick to remove cork from screw afterwards too. Have to say, we use ours for plastic corks as well, with no noticeable adverse effects ...

VitaminGee
1st Sep 2005, 11:44
Always wanted to try that sword thing, though. Problem is, with my lack of coordination I'd probably skewer a bystander. I've found it easier if, having removed the sword (Wilkinson's of course) from the scabbard, one holds the Bolly, Krug, Veuve etc. (foil and wire removed) at arms length tilted approximately 45 deg from the vertical with the bottle's seam uppermost. Using a backhand grip place the edge of the sword halway up the bottle on the seam and then, with reasonable force, slide the sword up the seam to make firm contact with the point where the seam meets the collar of the bottle which comes off clean as a whistle during the flourishing follow-through.:ok: Pour and serve:cool:
(Unless one enjoys lip surgery, do not drink from the bottle:ouch: :{ )

VG

ThreadBaron
1st Sep 2005, 12:50
One's problem, if it be such, is keeping the bottles unopened!

Send Clowns
1st Sep 2005, 13:00
Waiter's friend is the only corkscrew to use. Makes it look simple, can be done without strain standing up, and fits easily in the pocket. Have a lovely rubber-handled one, with a safe foil cutter from some designer kitchenware maker, and it is perfect. Don't ruin them by pulling the cork straight out, it weakens the hinge, always use the lever!

rubik101
1st Sep 2005, 15:45
Hey newswatcher, here we go again, slagging off the Low Cost end of the market!
It's not the wine bottles that are hard to open, it's the bungs wot they put in 'em. Pedantry rules on JB!
My mate has one of those wine bar thingies bolted to his worktop, one pull down, one pull up and bingo!
Buffers the screwtops though!

Jerricho
1st Sep 2005, 16:00
Speaking of opening wine bottles, if anyone ever gives you one of these as a gift....................

http://www.go1better.co.uk/images/products/00914_261x261.jpg

.......keep it in the box and give it to somebody else. Fricken useless things.

Jerricho
1st Sep 2005, 16:12
to push a cork into a bottle with your tongue.

I knew a girl once who could suck a golf ball through a hose. She would come in handy ;)

Shaggy Sheep Driver
1st Sep 2005, 16:26
Waiter's friend is the only corkscrew to use. Makes it look simple, can be done without strain standing up, and fits easily in the pocket. Have a lovely rubber-handled one, with a safe foil cutter from some designer kitchenware maker, and it is perfect. Don't ruin them by pulling the cork straight out, it weakens the hinge, always use the lever!

Do you mean that device that has a lever that sits on one side of the bottle neck against which the 'screw' pulls the cork out? I've seen so many broken-off corks left in bottles by waiter using those. The initial pull is OK, but when the cork is about half way out the lever starts to arc backwards, putting an increasing sideways pull on the half-out cork, which then shears off leaving about a third of the cork still in the bottle.

Swiss Army Knife corkscrew thingy does it for me. :ok:

SSD

rubik101
1st Sep 2005, 16:55
When caught without an opener, try the following.
Hold your forefinger firmly in the grip of your other hand. Poke the little bit of finger protruding straight down on the cork until the cork moves a little. Once the initial friction has been overcome you can probably move it further in with just one finger. The last part is best done in the sink or the bath! Keep pushing until it pops into the bottle! Invert fully so that the cork floats then quickly return the bottle to the normal delivery angle. Works every time for me!

GearDown&Locked
1st Sep 2005, 17:42
As a very choosy consumer of good wines, please take my advise: Don't buy plastic / rubber "corked" wine bottles!

Real corks are there for a reason and it can't be replaced by rubber or plastic "corks". Excellent wine makers will not accept those things apllied to their "liquid artwork" containers.

GD&L

Foss
1st Sep 2005, 18:35
Instead of fiddling with corks, plastic or otherwise, messing with swords, breaking fingers..

... buy a box.

Send Clowns
1st Sep 2005, 18:41
Shaggy

Crap waiters, not bad corkscrews! Impossible to look refined while using brute force of any straight-pull corkscrew, hence the lever ones are the best. Once the cork is about half out then the lever should be abandoned and the straight pull complete the extraction with little visible effort.

My preferred example is the OXO Good Grip (http://www.cookware-online.co.uk/ishop/930/shopscr1052.html), bought for me as a very appropriate present!

GearDown

As a lover of beautiful countriside and suporter of wildlife abundance, don't buy rubber corks! Cork oaks are in decline, due to lower demand, and this is not good for the areas where they were farmed.

Dead_Heading
1st Sep 2005, 21:10
Lever ones I've seen have 2 ledgey things- initial pull with one hooked part of lever, then move up to the second.

Real Cork, all the way:ok:

rubik101
1st Sep 2005, 22:33
Sorry GDL, the future is in the placcy jobs. Wine manufacturers cannot afford the 7-10% return rate on fine wines and are incresingly turning to the synthetic version to ensure 100% no spoiled wine! It's economics, not fashion that will rule in the end.

compressor stall
1st Sep 2005, 22:45
Rubik has got it in one.

A few years ago they were worried about the shortage of cork, but since the advent of synthetic corks there have been fewer spoiled or "corked" wines.

Apparently the problem of corking is largely initiated due to a bacteria that enters the bottle at some sage o the process - at last report they were not sure exactly when. Plastic corks either stop the bactieria entering in the first place, or don't allow it to multiply.

Gear down and locked I would like to see you push a plastic cork down into a bottle....

Get a long piece of wire (if you are on a picnic, you'll find some on the end of a fence). Push thru to make a hole in the cork, remove then bend one inch from the end over 180 deg. Push the bend thru, and then the inch of wire wil pop out under the cork, then remove gently.

Method two - a piece of string, methylated spirits, and cold water....I'll let you guess how that works?!:ok:

newswatcher
2nd Sep 2005, 09:19
Wonder what happened to this idea (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/31571.stm), note date!

An article on a "blind" tasting had wines in screw-top bottles taking top place. here (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2003/06/05/nwine05.xml)

It's not the wine bottles that are hard to open, it's the bungs wot they put in 'em. Pedantry rules on JB! Rubik, if you want to be pedantic, then please explain how you "open" a bung. Don't you "remove" it, to "open" the bottle!
:p