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delta x-ray
23rd Aug 2005, 02:33
This is a preety dumb question but I'm keen to find out. Do smokers have a hard time getting a 1st class medical? I've seen some pictures on airliners.net where packs of ciggarates are in the cockpit. :confused:

Dark Knight
23rd Aug 2005, 02:53
You are correct it is a dumb question.

Go and peddle your bleeding heart anti smoking campaign elswhere.

DK

Nicotine is a legal drug.

ps>> gave up smoking awhile ago.

Atlas Shrugged
23rd Aug 2005, 05:10
DXR,

Does your keyboard have a sticky "e" and "d"?

BALIX
23rd Aug 2005, 07:26
Dark Knight

A bit touchy there, weren't you? Maybe you are missing your nicotine fix more than you thought :ouch:

It is a reasonable question - a class one medical form asks the question of if you are a current smoker and if so how many. Whether the applicant responds truthfully or not is a different matter.

However, in answer to DXR's original question, smoking does not preclude the issue of a Class One as the number of nicotine addicts where I work will testify. Many of the deseases that smoking can cause or contribute to, though, will lead to the removal of a Class One...

doubleu-anker
23rd Aug 2005, 08:53
No it won't but don't know when the authorities will finally wake up.

To me a smoker is an addict. If a smoker has little regard for their health and well being by continuing with this dangerous but legal practise, what regard have they for the wellbeing of others?

An addict is a person with a mental problem who should not be at the controls of an A/C, until they are sorted out. Well, if a pilot who smokes has little regard for their health and well being, how can I garantee, they have my safety in mind?

Governments in general love smokers of course. It kills them off, rather than having to be looked after too long after "their sell by date" and of course is a great revenue earner.

Earthmover
23rd Aug 2005, 11:39
Oh, please.

In nearly forty years at the front end with both clean-living athletes and fag-ash encrusted, yellow-fingered coughers I can safely say there is no correlation whatever between need to smoke and ability to fly.

So you can feel safe now

delta x-ray
23rd Aug 2005, 14:26
Dark Knight,
I'm opposite you could say to an anti-smoking campaign. I'm a smoker myself and just wanted to ask a question.

Onan the Clumsy
28th Aug 2005, 14:03
In nearly forty years at the front end with both clean-living athletes and fag-ash encrusted, yellow-fingered coughers I can safely say there is no correlation whatever between need to smoke and ability to fly Oh yeah? (http://www.aviationmedicine.com/smoking.htm)

in case the print is too small to read...Non-smokers without any lung disease should consider using oxygen on night flights above 10,000’ MSL. Smokers will have almost a 40% reduction in night vision at 5,000’ MSL without oxygen.

:( <- that's hypoxia setting in

airship
28th Aug 2005, 15:19
Smokers will have almost a 40% reduction in night vision at 5,000’ MSL without oxygen. No wonder I couldn't see the neon-lit billboards when I last flew over N. America then...?! :O

frostbite
28th Aug 2005, 15:53
Do you smoke after sex?



Don't know, I've never looked.

delta x-ray
28th Aug 2005, 16:29
I smoke durring sex.:p

Antoninus
28th Aug 2005, 16:54
To me a smoker is an addict. If a smoker has little regard for their health and well being by continuing with this dangerous but legal practise, what regard have they for the wellbeing of others?

I don't know why but, for some reasons, this kind of quotes bring a word to my mind: fascism.
double ankeur: you CANNOT control other people's lives, by ANY means, including devious ones like that smoking or non smoking debate.
Lemme give you the scary truth, you don't even control you own life!
To me, non smokers like you are fanatics. As defined by Winston Churchill: "A fanatic is a person that won't change his mind and won't change the subject".
Now I won't tell you whether I smoke or not. You know why?
Because it's none of your business.

An addict is a person with a mental problem who should not be at the controls of an A/C, until they are sorted out.

"MENTAL PROBLEM"?? "SORTED OUT"??
You're the one with a mental problem, friend.

doubleu-anker
28th Aug 2005, 17:21
Antoninus

Ooooooh I think you just might be a naughty little smoker.

No I don't really want to be your friend.

Answer this one for me. Would you let your wife and kids loose in an A/C with a captain who has a cocaine habit? If not, why not?

Nicotine and cocaine are both deadly, both users are hopelessly addicted (I believe coke is easier to kick). The only difference I can see is that nicotine is legal.

Jerricho
28th Aug 2005, 17:32
Are you feckin serious?

Comparing smoking to cocaine use.

Wow.

Just out of interest doubleu, do you partake of alcohol?

Onan the Clumsy
28th Aug 2005, 17:36
Antonius It's a real issue, albeit perhaps not as important as if your pilot is snorking nose candy. That same web site I posted earlier also saidNicotine is a very additive drug that is quickly absorbed through the lungs and mucous membranes of the mouth. Even with the first exposure, users will feel it affects. The body is stimulated with activation of the "pleasure centers" of the brain. Heart rate and blood pressure will increase and there may be a "rush", particularly when first using tobacco. The effects of nicotine last for about 40 minutes and then the body responds with a craving for more. This sets up a cycle of increased blood levels of nicotine with effects on the brain’s "pleasure centers" followed by withdrawal and craving for more. After an individual has used tobacco for some time, the nicotine has a calming and sedating effect and the withdrawal is characterized by irritability, anxiety, restlessness and agitation.So when it's down to minimums and you have a guy sitting up front of you peering through the night sky, struggling to make out the blurry shapes he can hardly see cos the destination is Denver, do you want him to be relaxed and concentrating, or irritable, anxious, restless and agitated?




...and if that doesn't convince you, try this...

One final hazard of smoking during flight is simply the increased risk of fire with an ignition source in the cockpit. Although fire is not a physiologic effect of tobacco, the consequences of fire certainly do have significant physiologic effects! :uhoh:

Not impossible either, i did read one NTSB report once of a 337 (?) coming into land and a gas can fell over in the pasenger area :ooh: It was ok though cos the front seat pax turned round to right it := but he had a lit cigar in his hand :}

the ac was written off :{, but the 2 pob survived :ouch:

419
28th Aug 2005, 17:41
Are airline crew legally allowed to smoke in the cockpit of a non smoking flight?

Whirlygig
28th Aug 2005, 17:42
Doubleu-anker,

You may perhaps like to consider that smoking in not just a psychological addiction but also physical. Nicotine is one of the most physically addictive drugs known to man.

So it's not just a mental disorder that needs sorting; it is physiological as well.

Cheers

Whirlygig

Antoninus
28th Aug 2005, 18:03
OK...
Let's take a truck driver.
There are far more deadly accidents on the road than in the air.
He smokes two packs a day and he drives 40 tons of metal and freight at night. Towards Denver if you wish..
Let's take a car driver... And so on..
This is a new version of inquisition. Again it has very little to do with smoking and a lot to do with some yoyos trying to control other people's lives by any means.
If no one smoked they'd find something else.
Actually they do. You've got your anti-wool groups (shearing hurts the sheep), anti-milk groups (it's bad for your health), anti-meat groups (slaughtering animals is wrong) and so on, enough to fill a whole psychiatric ward. A big one.
Now I'd like some figures since we are going scientific there.

How many fires in the cockpit were caused by the crew's smoking habits?

How many crashes were directly linked to the crew's smoking habits?

BTW, Savonarole, I don't smoke... :cool:
And just in case you wonder, I sometimes get drunk, I drink milk, I wear wool and I eat meat (medium rare)

Solid Rust Twotter
28th Aug 2005, 18:54
Jumpseated on a flight where the only working lighter went tech. F/O and captain immediately lost all interest in what was going on outside and began searching for a lighter, to the extent that the F/O got out of his seat and rummaged in his luggage while the captain undid the seat belt and leaned backward to dig in his flight bag.

Really glad the autopilot didn't smoke.....:rolleyes:

As it was, I disembarked smelling like an ashtray. If those two were flying, I made sure I didn't blag the jumpseat after that.

That's a pretty strong addiction, IMO.:yuk:

Hobgoblin
28th Aug 2005, 20:00
My two cents worth.

If you smoke tobacco you have an addiction.

It is an insidious, very hard to break (in fact, make that extremely hard to break) addiction that society in the form of the mass media encourages by various methods. Believe it or not the best one to keep you hooked is the one where they try to convince you to give up. Makes it sound like you're missing out on something doesn't it? Sort of like " I like chocolate cake but I had to give it up:(.

Lots of cliches around smoking, one of the best ones I ever heard(and used myself I have to admit ) is the fantasy that I am in control and I can stop whenever I want. We've all heard the smoker proclaim proudly "I like to smoke" and "I only smoke when I want to"

Next time you have an opportunity, compare what any other substance abuser such as an alcoholic, heroin, cocaine addict etc say about their particular brand of poison.

Also, speak to any reformed addict of said substances and you'll more than likely see a cigarette in his or her hand. Strange that they can kick a drug as vicious as cocaine or alcohol but find nicotine so hard to beat.

Fact is smoking kills more people than any one cares to admit yet I have still to hear of a country anywhere that is willing to ban its production or sale. Call me a cynic, but could it be that someone is making a nice bundle on taxing the production, distribution and sale of tobacco?

Glad to see Ireland is leading the way in what it is hoped will be the wave of the future.

And yes, if anyone wondered I am an ex smoker and have turned into an anti smoking Nazi. However at the end of the day I no longer pay someone to poison me and contrary to what anyone may believe after this post, I am not opposed to smokers, just smoking.

Remember every time you stub out a cigarette you have stopped smoking...

until you light the next one.

BenThere
28th Aug 2005, 20:20
I was just reflecting on the impact of smoking on pilots. I certainly don't mean to be a cheerleader for the practise, as its ill effects are well known, making it hard to justify.

But on the short list of all the very best pilots and instructors I've flown with over the years, all were smokers. Maybe they were hypoxic, their night vision impaired. Perhaps they stunk. But something was clicking between them and the airplane. Maybe there are other effects we don't know about.

Smoking is the perfect example of something that hurts only the individual (Second hand damage claims are generally bogus.)

If you really want to save the world, go after alcohol first, as it touches many more with more devastating effect. Better yet, just mind your own business and and attain perfection in your own life before you set about interfering in mine. Thank you.

Turkish777
28th Aug 2005, 20:22
The say ex smokers are the worst.....

Maple 01
28th Aug 2005, 20:34
Second hand damage claims are generally bogus

tell that to Roy Castle!

and attain perfection in your own life before you set about interfering in mine.

OK, I. like the smell of Jet-A so don't interfer with my right to enjoy it while you're smoking nearby

Just face it, smoking is a disgusting habit, if you're not bothered about killing yourself, give a thought for us who have to share crewrooms/work areas/accomodation with you

BenThere
28th Aug 2005, 20:42
Maple,

Common courtesy is a virtue often ignored by smokers and non-smokers alike. Endangerment caused by smoking around a fuel source is unacceptable, of course.

My observation is simply that a number of people who won't tolerate smokers, and go over the top about it, are more distasteful and more of a nuisance than the smokers they despise. Courteous smokers and courteous non-smokers are more than capable of getting along without butting into each other's freedom.

doubleu-anker
28th Aug 2005, 20:45
In case you hadn't guessed I am not a non smoker. I am a smoker that has given up. Big difference. It will be with me for the rest of my life, just 1 cigerette from starting again, just like a reformed alcoholic really and I gave up over 20 years ago. I also know of a person who gave up for 25 years and started again when offered one in the pub when his "guard was down."

So if anyone tells you that nicotine is not addictive they are wrong.

Yes I drink but I can control that, unlike nicotine. I don't need a drink every 20 minutes or so but drink about 3 times a week or 5-6 units.

Onan the Clumsy
28th Aug 2005, 20:47
There are far more deadly accidents on the road than in the air. So what? Adjust the numbers for mile flown/driven, level of training, level of system support, average IQ of the individual involved, alcohol consumed etc and your statement might just mean something. :rolleyes:
How many fires in the cockpit were caused by the crew's smoking habits?

How many crashes were directly linked to the crew's smoking habits? I named one. If I could be bothered, I'd look for the accident report for you.
But on the short list of all the very best pilots and instructors I've flown with over the years, all were smokers. Maybe they were hypoxic, their night vision impaired. Perhaps they stunk. But something was clicking between them and the airplane. THink how good they would have been if they didn't smoke.

tart1
28th Aug 2005, 20:53
Don't know about the accident aspect of it - but it's true that ex-smokers are the worst.

If someone lights up near me in a restaurant, I get extremely stressy about it. It spoils whatever food I am eating or about to eat.

But, having said all that, I long for a cigarette most of the rest of the time. I really fancy one now but there are none in the house (luckily) and my mother (a smoker) is nowhere nearby. So I will go unfulfilled (again) !!!!! :{

Davaar
28th Aug 2005, 21:23
Aha!:
______________________
If you smoke tobacco you have an addiction.
______________________

Is this quite so? When I smoked (cigars, pipe) over a period of twenty years I always took the view that I could stop any time I felt like it. Pause here for guffaws from the anti-smoking nazis.

Every November I would stop for the month just to prove it to myself. It worked. Then I'd start back up for the Christmas season.

Well now, one year a terrible Fate overtook me. On 1 December I had no Tueros nor Confederation Mixture tobacco in the house, and little enough inclination to go buy some. Before I knew it we were at New Year's Day.

From there it was all downhill. I was deeper and deeper in the grip of a nasty habit that grew stronger and stronger, it took me past tobacconists, indifferent to their wares, Havana, Virginia, Turkish, it was all the same to me, and soon I had to admit to myself that I had become a non-smoker. It was not easy, let me tell you.

My friends looked at me askance, and the smiles grew cooler. What could I do? Sometimes I think of just facing up to it, and starting cold turkey, but I do not have the nerve.

Now, twenty years later I still revel in the aroma of a good cigar, and if by good fortune some acquaintance produces a child and offers a celebratory Havana, I will smoke that Havana. And there's an end ot it. No addiction whatever.

419
28th Aug 2005, 21:38
Davaar,
as you smoke cigars, you will probably know the answer to this.
How does the nicotine content of cigars compare to cigarettes.

I was just wondering if there is a reason why they don't appear to be as addictive.

Davaar
28th Aug 2005, 21:59
I'm sorry, 419, I really don't know.

I suspect the cigars carry a heavy load, buy less harmfully. I remember from my days in Ordinary Chemistry for Arts Students that pure liquid nicotine is a very strong poison indeed. The problem with cigars in my experience is that you do indeed get what you pay for. This is said of many products, but often without much truth. Once I bought a suit in Savile Row, and the seam on the sleeve split after one day's wear. It was such rubbish they replaced the whole thing.

Good cigars are good. Cheap cigars are often laced with what sounds like some fizzing potassium product, but the good ones are not.

In Canada I like Tueros, made in Canada of Havana leaf. Not perhaps for the great connoisseur, but good for me. When I used to smoke them they cost $0.41 each, but now several dollars each. Still, even inflation and sin taxes leave them a possibility if you like them.

I think the "addiction" element may lie in the inclination of cigar smokers just to enjoy the aroma, and not to drag the smoke to the furthest lobe of the lungs. A cigar should, of course, be smoked for active pleasure, after dinner say, and not as an addiction-feeder negative need-remover every twenty minutes in that undignified crowd around the door.

DishMan
28th Aug 2005, 22:38
...yes I detest smoking and hate the smell...so that's cleared up :rolleyes:

I believe that the tobacco indstry actually removes nicotine in the process of producing cigarettes an then deliberately reintroduces it during the fabrication process. That is, to my mind, a blatant banner waving admission that nicotine is the required "addictive" ingredient.
Otherwise, why not just keep it out :rolleyes:

I grew up with a father who smoked Rothmans Kingsize, one othe highest nicotine conetnt ciggies in the UK. One day he just put tem down and didn't touch them again. does that prove they were NOT addictive...NO! Just that he was lucky enough to be able to do it. Then I discovered he "only smoked while drinking" then "only occasionally".... go figure.

Over the years I have worked with smokers and non- smokers alike. There have been no major incidents to sway my thinking against a smoker.

BUT I would rather put my faith in someone who has the proven skills and abilities WITHOUT nicotine than someone who has similar abilities and relies on their regular nicotine fix.

One can react appropriately when no ciggie has been smoked at all...and the other MIGHT be able to react appropriately or not.....guess which one stands out as the lower risk pilot?
:rolleyes:

PS I just hate the idea of my kids breathing ciggie smoke second hand ( I mean why should they have to??)....so temper my anti-fag stance with that if you wish :E

Davaar
28th Aug 2005, 22:53
On the other hand, I do not so much like being surrounded by a vomit of drunks.

Antoninus
28th Aug 2005, 23:10
HEAR! HEAR!

My observation is simply that a number of people who won't tolerate smokers, and go over the top about it, are more distasteful and more of a nuisance than the smokers they despise. Courteous smokers and courteous non-smokers are more than capable of getting along without butting into each other's freedom.

Second hand smoking IS bogus. Don't give me any statistics, pleeeze..
You'll inhale far more harmful particles simply standing on a street corner in any big city at rush hour. And it won't smell that good.

What I mean about the truck driver comparison is, in that same "safety conscious" vein, and in order to improve road safety, smoking should be forbidden while driving, and since domestic accidents are --statistically-- more numerous that previously thought --whatever "previously'' may mean-- maybe we should actually "sort out" all the smokers and put them in reeducation camps, for their own good of course.
What is this, North Korea?

Hobgoblin
28th Aug 2005, 23:44
Wow, it really looks like the hornet's nest has been well and truly stirred and everyone whether smoker or not has a strong opinion on the matter.

Ben There: If my anti smoking stance has given offence I apologise. It is not my intention to be holier-than-thou towards any one person or group. I was lucky enough to be able to stop smoking and my intention is not to interfere in your or anyone else's life, or with your freedom to smoke or not.

Smoking is an addiction that is strongly defended by its adherents for a very good reason.

Fear.

If you think I am talking moondust; why do smokers always make sure they have enough cigarettes with them? Why when you go on a long trip do you always check if you have enough in the box and if in doubt put an extra in the bag for in case you run out?

Why do smokers always tell you they can stop when they want, they only smoke because they enjoy it and they only smoke when they want to?

And then every smoker has a story about someone who has quit by just putting it down never to smoke again and never missed smoking for a second. ( By the way my dad did that so I know it can be done - he still craves the stuff.)

If this thread lasts long enough someone is going to tell us about his aunt or uncle that smoked 40 a day since the age of 16, was never sick a day and is still happily smoking at the age of 95.

It could even be true - but then I am willing to bet that Aunt Harriet or Uncle Frank does not have a friend left alive as he has outlived them all. Not surpising since he must be an exceptionally strong man (or woman ) to have survived all that poison for so long. You do get people like that, but don't kid yourself, they are extremely rare.

The fact is: once that monkey is on your back you think he is a friend and by the time you get tired of him he has grown into a huge gorilla. Not so easy to shift him then. Easier to convince yourself you like having him there.

To everyone who smokes I can only say good luck. If you want to know how I stopped PM me and I'll tell you the secret.

Onan the Clumsy
29th Aug 2005, 00:14
As defined by Winston Churchill: "A fanatic is a person that won't change his mind and won't change the subject".

...

Second hand smoking IS bogus. Don't give me any statistics, pleeeze..


love fifteen
:}

Confabulous
29th Aug 2005, 01:03
Interesting thread, and one close to my heart, so to speak... I'm an NLP practitioner, and help people give up various substances (unhappiness being the most poisonous) on a regular basis, but it's struck me that they have to WANT to give up - no amount of hypnosis etc can convince someone who WANTS to keep smoking no matter what to give up - I usually recommend they to do whatever makes them happy in the long run. It's their life.

The strange thing is the vociferous anti-smoking lobby - they claim that the knowledge that someone is smoking 3 feet away will give you cancer/emphysema etc. The amount of pollutants in the air without smokers around is unbelieveably high anyway, and getting fixated on one cause isn't going to help - that would be going down the path of banning breathing. I don't smoke, but I see the two sides all the time. Nicotine is physically addictive, and legal, but so is coffee and alcohol, as well as oxygen, and I don't see anyone trying to ban those.

Since the smoking ban has come into effect in Ireland I've seen a vast increase in the number of smokers come to me wanting to give up - not because of the cancer warnings, but because they enjoy being warm and dry. Smokers are in general very sociable - and they prefer to do the socialising in the warmth of the pub/office/nightclub etc. I recently went to cardiff, and the smoking in resteraunts, cafes etc was immediately noticeable, even though I'm around smokers ever day.

In my opinion, each side has their valid arguments for and against, but the more they try to ban smoking completely, raise prices etc, the harder it'll be to kill it now (think of the Prohibition in the US). Leave it be like it is in Ireland and it'll filter out.

Everyone who smokes can give up, if they really want to. It's not fear or anything Freudian (or SickMan Fraud as he's known), it just makes them feel good - the trick is to find something they feel even better about - or just make them feel ambivalent about smoking itself. Making people feel bad about the dangers of passive smoking and shortening their lifespan only works with relatively few clients - most prefer to feel better about life in general, but out of 342 this year there's only been one who preferred to keep smoking, and he's only on 5 a day :cool: :ok:

Confab

(Edited for brain fades)

BigEndBob
29th Aug 2005, 10:07
The sooner smoking is banned in all public areas or just ban it totally the better.

It killed my father and many more than any wars.

I always got irritated by flying instructors who would as soon as they had landed felt the need to light up.

TheFlyingSquirrel
29th Aug 2005, 10:26
All smokers should be boiled alive in hot oil ! ( says the ex-smoker of two years ! ) What a waste of f***** time that is !! Anyone thinking of starting - you mug ! Any smokers defending themselves here - you mug !

419
29th Aug 2005, 11:17
Second hand smoking IS bogus. Don't give me any statistics, pleeeze


In that case, it must be my imagination that when I come out a pub, my clothing stinks of cigarette smoke.

Why don't you want statistics? Could it possibly be that they might prove your comment is bull5hit.

How does the old saying go?

"your pleasure is smoking. The resultant of which is smoke, which covers my clothes.
My pleasure is drinking, the resultant of which is urine. How would you like it if I pi55ed all over your clothes.

GearDown&Locked
29th Aug 2005, 11:31
Vive La Resistance!

I smoke a pack a day. So what?

I don't smoke near non-smokers, I don't smoke in restaurants, I don't smoke inside my house, I don't smoke inside the office building, I even don't smoke in my car. It's my own private pleasure.

So when someone is talking about all that BS about smoking, and smoking bans and such... they must remenber that they are giving me the "right" to talk about and criticise their sexual preferences, eating and/or drinking habits, the way they educate their children, et ceatera.

Having said that, I'll go out now and allow myself to have a smoke.

GD&L

Speed Twelve
29th Aug 2005, 16:06
For those advocating pilots smoking as having an effect on the safety of flight, consider that a good proportion of the Apollo astronauts smoked, Neil Armstrong included.

No chance of a quick puff in the descent to the Moon...

Discuss! :}

ST (non-smoker, Devil's Advocate)

effortless
29th Aug 2005, 18:46
O dear here we go again. I won't bore you all with stats but:

Almost all smokers start when they are children.

Smoking is harder to give up than heroine.

Smoking does cause lung cancer, heart disease and loads of other things.

Many smokers die after being attached to an oxygen line for the last five to twenty years of their lives.

Smokers taste awful, ever gone down on a smoker? Even their knickers taste of smoke.

The only reason people smoke IS TO MAKE SOME FAT, RICH BASTARD FATTER AND RICHER

I have lost someone of whom I was very fond when she died within thirteen months of having her first baby. She was diagnosed when she was in labour with lung cancer.

normal_nigel
29th Aug 2005, 19:44
doubleu-anker

You are by far the most pompous cretin on the whole of pprune.

And that is really saying something.

White Bear
29th Aug 2005, 20:03
There is more than hint of fascism in the anti smoking lobby arguments

It seems to me GearDown&Locked has a good pint. The antismoking lobby is commenting strongly on a lifestyle choice, without considering the counterpoint. “Other’s may feel free to criticize their sexual preferences, eating and/or drinking habits, the way they educate their children, et ceatera”.

The minute we allow ourselves to be governed by ‘popular demand’ or ‘popular degree’ without considering the source or the influences, we abandon all hope of a real democracy.


Onan, I’m surprised at you. I thought better of you.
Quoting a statistic that smoking will decrease your night vision by 40%.
We are all individuals, so 40% of what?
I have a good friend, a non smoker, whose night vision is (IMHO) so bad that I refuse to ride with him at night. So 40% of what norm? 40% of who, or whom?
Even if the percentage number is correct, (and that alone is questionable, how strong was the tobacco give the subject, how much, over how long a period, in what manner, cigarette, pipe, cigar, chew, snuff???), there will still be some smokers whose (impaired) night vision will be better than some non smokers.

Why can’t we enjoy our dirty habits, and treat each other with respect?

Please bring back the humor and balance you are so well known for.
Regards,
White Bear.

Taildragger55
29th Aug 2005, 20:43
Smoking causes diarrhoea in pilots.

At least it did for me once when an instructor lit up unknown to me in the circuit and I smelled burning.

Splook.

Personally I can live with others smoking if they don't give them to children and if I can't smell the malodorous buggers.

The industry are of, course, lying scum who deserve to be disembowelled publicly.

Onan the Clumsy
29th Aug 2005, 22:00
doubleu-anker - You are by far the most pompous cretin on the whole of pprune Come come now. I can think of at least one, more pompous and cretinous by far :E





Diarrhoea almost caused smoking in pilots.

At least it did for me once when my PIC had to tak a dump in a cardboard box at the back of the airplane and I smelled it :yuk: (I did have the passing thought of yanking back on the control column :} )





Onan, I’m surprised at you. I thought better of you. :(

Why can’t we enjoy our dirty habits, and treat each other with respect? good point. I'll have to take that on the ...erm chin :=

balance :ooh:

dragonflyA109
30th Aug 2005, 03:48
IfNicotine is one of the most physically addictive drugs known to man.

then Chocolate is the most mentally addictive drug known to woman :E

I should know - I live on the drug nicotine, my good lady on the chocolate.

But I am a responsible smoker

Why can’t we enjoy our dirty habits, and treat each other with respect

I second that :ok: