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effortless
24th May 2005, 11:13
Basic Flying Rules: "Try to stay in the middle of the air. Do not go
Near the edges of it. The edges of the air can be recognized by the appearance of ground, buildings, sea, trees and interstellar space. It is much more difficult to fly here."

"If you're faced with a forced landing, fly the thing as far into the crash as possible."

- Bob Hoover (renowned aerobatic and test pilot)

"Never fly in the same cockpit with someone braver than you."

"There is no reason to fly through a thunderstorm in peacetime."

- Sign over squadron ops desk at Davis-Monthan AFB, AZ, 1970

"If something hasn't broken on your helicopter, it's about to."

"If the wings are travelling faster than the fuselage, it's probably a
helicopter -- and therefore, unsafe."

"When one engine fails on a twin-engine airplane you always have enough power left to get you to the scene of the crash."

"Though I Fly Through the Valley of Death ... I Shall Fear No Evil.
For I am at 80,000 Feet and Climbing."

- At the entrance to the old SR-71 operating base Kadena,

scrubed
24th May 2005, 12:37
Don't forget:

P: Something loose in cockpit
E: Something tightened in cockpit

P: right engine missing
E: right engine found attached to wing

etc





etc





etc............. :rolleyes:




PS: If you're faced with a forced landing, fly the thing as far into the crash as possibleWTF does that mean??? If you "fly it" then you haven't crashed yet. You can't crash until you stop flying. I thought that was lemonentry watson????

I guess Bob isn't such a whip after all.....

Jhieminga
24th May 2005, 13:58
WTF does that mean??? If you "fly it" then you haven't crashed yet.
Cannot fully agree with that. There are several circumstances that may lead to a certain and inevitable encounter with terra firma without having lost control of the airplane yet. And in those circumstances it could just mean the difference between life and death if you remain in control until the last moment as opposed to giving up hope at 300ft.

In the Hurricane/Spitfire days several sources advocated carrying out a crash in densely wooded area by stalling the aircraft just above the treetops. That way you would be sinking into the treetops at the lowest possible forward speed. That means having to pass less treetrunks before coming to a standstill. Something I would consider doing if I would find myself in such a circumstance.

Onan the Clumsy
24th May 2005, 14:05
Eino Luukkenen wrote a book called Fighter over Finland and he recounted crashing a 109 in a wooded area. He chose two trees and used them to take the wings off. He was already on the ground of course, but skidding along at a fair rate of speed.

Link #1 (http://www.virtualpilots.fi/hist/WW2History-LuukkanenEnglish.html)

Link #2 (http://www.sci.fi/~fta/finace03.htm)

scrubed
24th May 2005, 14:28
circumstances that may lead to a certain and inevitable encounter with terra firma without having lost control of the airplane yetSo you haven't crashed yet. You fly, then you crash. Can't do both at once except in the new version of Flight of the Phoenix" which was not a good fillum.

In a stall, you are falling, not flying.

Well you are kind of flying through the air... downward. But not really "flying" as Pontius did it.

You're kidding yourself if you think you have much control over a still moving ball of wreckage by yanking the yoke around. Anyway most pilates are too busy kissing their arses goodbye at that stage to attempt anything fancy with the wreckage.

I still think Bob Hoover shoulda stuck with vacuum cleaners. Old fart.... :rolleyes:

OpenCirrus619
24th May 2005, 14:37
I think it refers to "keep flying the aircraft until ALL the parts have stoped moving".

When I was doing my PPL someone had engine failure on final with full flaps, put it into the only field available and realised that he was not going to stop. Instead of assuming the "kissing a****hole goodbye" position, as soon as the wheels were on the ground, he carried on "flying the aircraft" and managed to direct it through an open gate. If the gate had been wider, or the gate posts shorter, he wouldn't even have damaged the airframe. As it was he walked away without a scratch - thus qualifying for a "good" landing (as opposed to a "great" one).

scrubed
24th May 2005, 14:53
Wouldn't that be taxiing the aircraft as far into the crash as possible, then.....???

I still say you can't crash and fly at the same time. Even the Phoenix crash was a fly-crash-fly-crash again-fly again-crash again-etc, etc kinda thing.

Anyway I think BH muttered something after a bottle of JD and everyone thought it must be Gold, Jerry, just because he flew P-51s and can pour water upside down.

Miserlou
24th May 2005, 20:04
I don't see the problem of flying through the crash.

When you get to try it you'll discover that a crash doesn't go from a state of not having happened to all over in an instant. And given the human brain's ability to work extremely fast under pressure, almost like like time dilation, one may have time tomanipulate the controls in such a way as to influence the final outcome.

So many spam-can drivers stop flying the aircraft as soon as the aircraft touches the ground whilst it is actually very well controllable by aerodynamic forces.

captplaystation
24th May 2005, 21:21
Think it depends whether you could see it coming or whether you completely lost the plot.I remember an Instructor once saying to his student,only half-jokingly, "well the good news young man is that if you have an accident it won't hurt, because you are so far behind this bloody aeroplane you can just step out the way afterwards"many a true word spoken in jest;just hope I could keep my eyes open if it came to it,I have this frustrating habit of closing them/ducking if I see birds reversing into the windshield at 250KT

effortless
24th May 2005, 22:00
Fugginell it was supposed to a bit of lighness for a grotty morning.
http://www.security-forums.com/forum/images/smiles/icon_rolleyes.gif

Onan the Clumsy
24th May 2005, 22:14
Well don't do it again!

PA-28-180
25th May 2005, 06:27
I was actually taught during my mountain flying course in California to also land between the trees in case the "pilot cooling device" ie, prop stopped. It would take off the wings (losing the fuel) and also cut down on the decel effects. I didn't know that it went back to the Spitfire though!:O

chuckT
25th May 2005, 08:15
I guess it is also better to loose the wings, than having the engine on your lap :uhoh:

Lon More
25th May 2005, 10:12
There was avideo around a couple of years ago made by a BBC(?) cameraman in Canada where he kept on filming as the aircraft flew into the trees. All walked away without a scratch I believe

I was always told that the flight doesn't end until all the parts have stopped moving - regardless of where you park it.

effortless
25th May 2005, 10:18
There was avideo around a couple of years ago made by a BBC(?) cameraman in Canada where he kept on filming as the aircraft flew into the trees. All walked away without a scratch I believe

Ok so add to your survival kit:

BBC CAMERA emergency for the use during, 1 number.



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