PDA

View Full Version : Question for meat-bombs


scrubed
18th May 2005, 17:15
Any free-fallers out there.... I have been told that during free-fall, when you reach terminal velocity, the speed (and therefore dynamic pressure) is such that air passes through the skin in a kind of forced-absorption process.

They say at these speeds, you no longer need to breathe using the traditional method.

Now it sounds like the Bank of Springfield to me BUT my girlfriend says the idea of me not needing to breathe through my mouth presents possibilities.

So is it true?

Anybody....


Bueller.....




Bueller.....

Solid Rust Twotter
18th May 2005, 17:32
....not needing to breathe through my mouth presents possibilities.



Jerricho and a roll of duct tape?:E :ok:

Dead_Heading
18th May 2005, 17:32
Try breathing through yer ears :E

Caslance
18th May 2005, 17:35
the idea of me not needing to breathe through my mouth presents possibilities.Try breathing through yer earsShouldn't be a problem. After all, he usually talks through his..... oh, is that the time already? :D

RaraAvis
18th May 2005, 17:39
Right, perhaps you'd care to experiment and report the findings ?

Now, are you a large, heavy individual (nothing wrong with that, of course, softer landing, no?!:ouch: ) . Just that the terminal velocity depends on the weight of the falling body/s:E and on the orientation at which the body/s fall. Average TV is considered 53m/s-76m/s.

You figure out how high you have to fall from to make your girlfriends ideas worth while ... for her.

CUNIM
18th May 2005, 17:39
One normally breathes through ones nose.

scrubed
18th May 2005, 17:46
Bueller..............







Bueller..............







Bueller..............





Ah a reply.

Funny you should mention that, Mr. Asslance!!

Tonic Please
18th May 2005, 17:52
Just that the terminal velocity depends on the weight of the falling body/s...

Erm...call me stupid but...

Since when has that one entered the physics text books? :confused:

scrubed
18th May 2005, 18:00
We're talking about jumping through the atmosphere, here. The preferred medium for parachuting and the one in which the 'chute generally performs best .

You're thinking of the speed of a falling body in a vacuum. Sort of. In a vaccum, there is no terminal velocity. Or is there?

Anyway the real question is can I give my lungs a rest whilst free-fallling or will this lead to a bounce.

Can't believe some people would make bad taste jokes about this, by the way.

Tonic Please
18th May 2005, 18:05
SCIENTISTSSSS????????????

Scrubed, you fly 767's. Shouldn't you know about this relatively basics physics? :uhoh:

RaraAvis
18th May 2005, 18:11
Tonic Please

If you insist ...

Lets clarify : for a heavy object, TV is greater than for a light object - because, AIR resistance is proportional to the falling object's velocity squered. For the said object to experience TV, AIR resistance must balance the weight.
Another bit, if an object falls with a large surface area perpendicular to the direction of motion, it will experience greater force and smaller TV.

:8

Onan the Clumsy
18th May 2005, 18:12
This is almost worth taking him off my ignore list to see what he's saying.


Nah.




Rara Well I'm glad you clarified that :confused:


:}

scrubed
18th May 2005, 18:12
What the hell you talking about, Tonic????? :confused: You bin on the gin again???

We are trying to discuss human biology here.


Anyway what's so hard about the above physics? have you ever tried to flatten a cat by dropping a feather on it from the third floor? Next time try a pot-plant.

I thought there a few Big Brains around here???



Anybody????








Bueller........




PS Who wants to bet Onan sneaks a teeny weeny little peak.....

tony draper
18th May 2005, 18:13
Falling bodies don't weigh nufink.
:cool:

nosefirsteverytime
18th May 2005, 18:22
Verry good Mr. Draper. They have mass!

Now, as for the mechanics of the situation:

Terminal Velocity depends on

Mass of object

Cross sectional area in front of and behind object

Air pressure

Air movement

And I'd say that whole air absorbtion thing would depend on the amount of skin exposed to the air

And considering that at those heights the air is rather cold......

RaraAvis
18th May 2005, 18:22
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Since when has that one entered the physics text books?
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yarrrr, the new text books, all the new ideas n' stuff, all bollocks, I say !!!!! Heard some chap yapping about earth bein' round an' all.....:p

CUNIM
18th May 2005, 18:22
One normally breathes through ones nose.

scrubed
18th May 2005, 18:23
Great.
:zzz:

Caslance
18th May 2005, 18:26
Heard some chap yapping about earth bein' round an' all..... Round? :ooh:

That's plain daft - how would it balance on the turtle's back if it was round?

scrubed
18th May 2005, 18:28
Bueller...........





Bueller...........





Bueller...........





Bueller...........

Jerricho
18th May 2005, 19:36
Can't help you Scrubby, but I know when I did my first tandem dive I did wonder how I managed to scream like a little girl the whole way down without taking a breath.

Tonic Please
18th May 2005, 21:06
I know you're on about biology mate, but i picked out the bit about terminal velocity and just wanted a simple clarification but yet again..... :rolleyes:

Thanks for the information R

Solid Rust Twotter
18th May 2005, 21:10
Can't see it being absorbed through the skin.

It's just air, albeit moving along a bit. Breathe as you would when you hang out of the car window to annoy other motorists.:}

cavortingcheetah
18th May 2005, 21:17
;) Is it the Duck Billed Platypus that breathes through another orifice as well as its nose? You chaps in Australia should know that.

This fascination with Bueller.
Would that be Ferris Bueller?

Popple on now. :D

SmilingKnifed
18th May 2005, 21:20
I can't imagine it also penetrating ribs, trachea or bronchi. And seeing as gas exchange occurs at the alveoli......

ShyTorque
18th May 2005, 21:21
Er... I think air absorbed through the skin is done by amphibians.

Air absorbed by the skin of a mammal is called an air embolism and is likely to be fatal. This is why it's dangerous to blow in a lady's .......ear.

joe2812
18th May 2005, 21:37
Caslance - it's supported by four elephants remember...

I assume they act a four-legged tripod... a quadpod perhaps?

tony draper
18th May 2005, 22:13
Watched a documentry once about a American military chap leaping out of a balloon at about 100,000 feet and free falling a awful long way before opening his chute, he was falling at mach one +
:uhoh:
Rather he than me,
"uhoh"

Read something interesting once, if yer threw a 1 pound weight into the ogan over the challenger deep, it would take three and a half hours to reach the bottom.
:cool:

SmilingKnifed
18th May 2005, 23:44
A British guy was going to try and beat that record fairly recently but wound up going mad and topping himself. I guess you'd have to be mad to jump from the edge of space in a pressure suit! I can't be bothered to work out what Mach 1 is in that vicinity, but I imagine you fall bloody quickly.

Solid Rust Twotter
19th May 2005, 07:21
Capt (Rtd) Joseph W. Kittinger.

102,800'

Lost his right glove which made things difficult, to say the least.

Another test jumper, Nick Piantanida, jumped from a balloon at a slightly higher altitude but didn't survive the jump. When they opened his pressure suit he was on his last legs and didn't make it to the hospital.

Reckon they both carried them around in a wheelbarrow.....

RaraAvis
19th May 2005, 09:58
quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Round?

That's plain daft - how would it balance on the turtle's back if it was round?
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Heloooo, like, what was the chewing gum ever invented for, eh ? :ouch:

tubthumper
19th May 2005, 10:51
Surely it all depends on the amount of skin area exposed to the air: the greater the area, the more air "absorbed".

Sky-diving naked, whilst holding one's breath....:(

Caslance
19th May 2005, 15:44
Heloooo, like, what was the chewing gum ever invented for, eh ?Why, for sticking on the bedpost overnight, as any fule kno..... :ooh:

ehwatezedoing
19th May 2005, 16:07
the greater the area, the more air "absorbed". oh yeah! and the greater the stress, the more air "expulsed"... :}

Skydivers are fart's kings/queens of the sky before a jump run!



Bueller...........




Bueller...........




Bueller...........


What was the question ? :E

Solid Rust Twotter
19th May 2005, 16:10
Dropped my sump on jump run once and a very green/purple team member begged me to pull her reserve if she passed out.

In the days before AADs.....:E

Gouabafla
19th May 2005, 16:10
Just can't see this one having any validity. I'm pretty sure that transfer of oxygen across a cell boundary only happens when the oxygen is in solution. At the very least, the surface where the oxygen is transferred must be very moist (that's why the inside of your lungs is always damp). Another problem is that you've got a great thick layer of dead cells covering almost all of your skin: your lung linings are alive and directly exposed to the oxygen. Then lastly, as has been mentioned, the surface area is a real problem. The spongey structure of the lungs gives them a huge surface area. Even if you did skydive naked (and covered in moisturiser to make sure you were damp enough) the whole of your skin would have an infinitessimly (sp?) small surface area compared to your alveoli. Mind you, if you hit the ground fast enough, your surface area would increase substantially.

Onan the Clumsy
19th May 2005, 16:12
Dropped my sump on jump run once I messed my britches in freefall once. Not from fear though, I just followed through :ugh: