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View Full Version : Sperm Donor Anonymity Rights End DISCUSS! ! !


mikedurward
1st Apr 2005, 08:38
People donating sperm and eggs will no longer have the right to remain anonymous, under a new law coming into force on Friday.
Children conceived in this way will now be able to identify their genetic parents once they reach 18.

The new rules will not be retrospective, so people who have already donated will not be affected.

But some experts are concerned that the removal of anonymity will deter donors from coming forward in the future.

And the British Fertility Society has warned that couples who do want eggs or sperm from anonymous donors may choose to go to unlicensed "backstreet" clinics, or travel abroad to countries with less strict regulations.

'No financial obligation'

Around one in seven couples in the UK have fertility problems.

There is now serious concern in many clinics about the future of infertility treatments

Dr Alan Pacey, British Fertility Society


'I want to know where I come from'

An estimated 7,000 patients receive treatment with donated eggs and sperm, known as gametes, every year and, as a result, 2,000 children are born.

Around 500 sperm donors and 1,500 egg donors are needed each year.

However, clinics say there are long waits for some infertile couples. One reported that a couple had been waiting five years for donated material.

Other clinics have closed their waiting lists.

Genetic origins

The change in the rules means that children conceived using donor eggs or sperm will be able to trace their biological parent in the same way as children who are adopted.

Sperm donation has been seen as 'smutty' - it's time we changed that

Dr Ruth Curzon - King's Hospital

While children will be able to access more information about the donor's genetic origins, they will have no financial or legal claim.

Because the law only applies to people who donate from Friday, the first time children born in this way will have the option to ask for the identity of their donor will be when they turn 18 in 2023.

They will have to ask the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority to release the information.

The donor will not be able to trace a child.

'Creating a family'

Health minister Stephen Ladyman said: "We think it is right that donor conceived people should be able to have information should they want it about their genetic origins and that is why we have changed the law on donor anonymity."

To limit the possibility of a fall in the number of donors, the Department of Health and the National Gamete Donation Trust (NGDT) has been running a campaign to raise awareness of donation.

Laura Witjens, chair of the NGDT, said evidence from other countries, such as Sweden, which had already removed anonymity rights, showed it was no longer young students who donated.

"There is an initial fall. But then the profile changes. Instead of young single men who do not have children, it tends to be older men, who do have children and who see that what they are doing is creating a family, who come forward."

Dr Ruth Curzon, of the Assisted Conception Unit at Kings Hospital in London, said: "We are going to have to change the way in which we recruit donors. Sperm donation has been seen as 'smutty'. It's time we changed that."

But Dr Alan Pacey, of the British Fertility Society, warned: "There is now serious concern in many clinics about the future of infertility treatments using donated gametes.

"We have evidence that more and more patients are being denied treatment because of a shortage of donor gametes."




DISCUSS! ! ! ! !

UniFoxOs
1st Apr 2005, 11:16
And how long will it be before one of the children puts the CSA onto getting support from the father??

PilotsPal
1st Apr 2005, 11:45
There is and always has been a shortage of egg donors - unsurprising as it's not an easy or entirely straightforward process. This legislation will undoubtedly end the hopes of many recipient women on the waiting list for such donation.

Jerricho
1st Apr 2005, 12:28
Exactly PP.

I'm sure this will change the mind of many would be donors.

(Of course, you will still the the college guy who want the money to buy beer!)

tony draper
1st Apr 2005, 12:42
One thought the protocol was, never let the left hand know what the right hand is doing?
:rolleyes:

stagger
1st Apr 2005, 13:16
There is already a serious shortage of sperm donors in the UK - the fact that this legislation was looming has put many potential donors off.

This will make things difficult for patients and difficult for scientists trying to do research.

Never quite understood the "need to know your genetic background" argument. Someone with an anonymous donor father carries round copies of all the genes they inherited from that him.

Burnt Fishtrousers
1st Apr 2005, 13:28
If your one of those people that goes to the sperm clinic weekly and whacks one off for a tenner, ( those back copies of Penthouse are looking a bit dog eared)you are going to have an awful lot of people looking for you.

What you call coming into money I suppose:ok:

Kolibear
1st Apr 2005, 13:51
It could get a bit embarrassing - imagine it, you're sitting at home one evening with wife & 10 year old child. Theres a knock at the door, you answer it and theres an 18 yr old girl standing on the doorstep saying 'Daddy!!' :uhoh:

Burnt Fishtrousers
1st Apr 2005, 13:54
.....and your wife would scream..."What have you been up to, you w&nker"

ehwatezedoing
1st Apr 2005, 15:28
On the other side,

I find it kind of weird/curious not wanting to know what happen with your "spermatozoids" or "eggs" if they might become someone. And if so, not taking care of the "person " they will be.....you know what I mean... :hmm:

That's why I'll never be a "sperm donor".

Except when I'm sure about their fate :E

Onan the Clumsy
1st Apr 2005, 16:17
If your one of those people that goes to the sperm clinic weekly and whacks one off for a tenner, ( those back copies of Penthouse are looking a bit dog eared)you are going to have an awful lot of people looking for you. Actually, sperm banks limit the number of times you can donate. An odd restriction you might think, until you contemplate that many of the sperm will eventually becomoe people and they want to avoid a new genertion of children with the same genetic traits - the Wunderkind comes to mind.

There was a case in the US where the doctor was substituting his own and had created many (maybe fifty?) children, often with couples who thought they were raising their own. Now THAT's spooky.

Rainboe
1st Apr 2005, 16:39
I find it kind of weird/curious not wanting to know what happen with your "spermatozoids" or "eggs" if they might become someone. And if so, not taking care of the "person " they will be.....you know what I mean...

This is a bit naive! Why should you be interested in them. All you have done is contribute to anonymous procreation. If you want anonymity, you should have it. You should be spared the threat of having someone you don't know and have no interest in knocking on your door out of the blue if you want your privacy! And you should most certainly be spared any threat of Child support, maintenance whatever.

The sad outcome is this. The 'rights' of the offspring have been regarded more important than the responsibility to maintain anonymity for the donor. Quite simply the donor will feel his rights have been overriden, and he will not bother himself. Nobody is forcing him- if they will not respect his rights to privacy, he will not donate. Who 'wins'?

ehwatezedoing
1st Apr 2005, 20:47
Why should you be interested in them. All you have done is contribute to anonymous procreation
That's why I'm saying I'll never be a "sperm donor"
- First I'm too naive to be selected :8
- Then I'd like to know the outcome.

More seriously, being the natural (and wanted) father of 2 wonderful daughters, I can't imagine missing the joy of having them in my life.


Anyway, just a quick personal "naive" :* opinion as I don't want to hijack this topic into a father/mother definition.

Onewordanswer
2nd Apr 2005, 10:02
Giving away your building block of life is an incredibly rash and ill thought concept, if you have ever had the real thing I doubt many would do it.

Solid Rust Twotter
2nd Apr 2005, 10:44
The purpose of all life is nothing more than to pass on our genetic material to the next generation. The only surprising thing is that there aren't queues outside sperm banks, fighting to get a piece of this simple way of fulfilling our purpose. It certainly beats buying dinner and putting up with the nagging.....:E

Onewordanswer
2nd Apr 2005, 11:02
And you have how many kids........?????
None? Suprise suprise:E

Solid Rust Twotter
2nd Apr 2005, 11:06
Yep!:ok:

Afraid they may turn out to be [email protected] like you and I'd have to have them put down.

Rainboe
2nd Apr 2005, 11:53
I'm afraid SWT is absolutley right! That is the one purpose you are put on this Earth for- not to build bridges, roads or fly 747s. You are here to procreate- nothing else. Continuation of the species. This is traditionally done with flowers, many dinners, waiting patiently whilst hormones run amok periodically, ducking when things are thrown at you, waiting patiently in the waiting room (please don't get suckered into actually going into the delivery room until all the shouting is over- it's a truly horrible experience). If this can be achieved by anonymous donation- how marvellous! You can get on with playstation and nights out with your mates, football every Saturday (without trawling every Karen Millen shop within 50 miles all day Saturday....every Saturday).

As for wanting a relationship- you are not procreating with someone you like or even know. Why should you become involved- that is not what the affair is about. But they are going to take that anonymity away. So you are not going to bother- it really will be an unwelcome intrusion having some spotty teenager with dental braces standing on your doorstep saying 'Daddy!' whilst your new (childless) partner is standing behind you saying 'who is it dear?' Disaster. Who will lose? Those women desperate for a load of male chromosomes.

The donor has rights too- they are being ignored in favour of the rights of the offspring. Except there won't be any offspring anymore.............there won't be no donors!

Bern Oulli
2nd Apr 2005, 20:06
Is it not true that there are just a teeny weeny bit too many offspring in the world already? I suspect any downturn in this market is to be encouraged.

Incoming!!!

Blacksheep
4th Apr 2005, 01:40
Just imagine the horror of discovering that your father was a sheep :E

Solid Rust Twotter
4th Apr 2005, 07:04
Plenty of Ozmates with a penchant for grass.:E

Nothing new there, then....:ok: