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Bigwings
21st Mar 2005, 19:00
Thought this link might provide a bit of light hearted diversion in the small hours:-

http://www.micom.net/oops/

Bigwings :uhoh:

Onan the Clumsy
21st Mar 2005, 19:23
I spent a whole weekend looking at these about a month ago.

I still can't figure out (and would love to) the story behind the B24 picture.

Jerricho
21st Mar 2005, 19:35
The US Air Forces experimentation with "catapult" launch systems met with mixed results.

cringe
21st Mar 2005, 20:16
The B24 crashed at takeoff from a base near Cerignola, Italy on 12 April 1945. Six crew were killed, 4 survived.

http://b24bw.proboards33.com/index.cgi?board=B24Aircraft&action=display&num=1106355336

Bigwings
21st Mar 2005, 20:43
I still can't figure out (and would love to) the story behind the B24 picture.

Oh good, thought I'd missed something................

Bigwings :confused:

Onan the Clumsy
21st Mar 2005, 20:58
Ok. On take off makes sense because the (vertical) speed might be fairly slow. If it had dived vertically from a height, there wouldn't be much left of it, certainly not an intact spar.

but...


It says they were off the deckAccident involved take off for combat mission, in witch, airplane lifted off run way, plot applied brakes to stop main gear rotation and the airplane settled back down, as a result, the nose wheel collapsed and the aircraft slid off the runway about 150 yards until a dirt embankment arrested movement and the craft came to rest in this unusual position. The report recommends All pilots should be instructed on the dangers of retracting main gear too soon and of applying brakes too soon after take-off. in which case, the only thing applying the brakes could do would be to transfer the angular momentum of the wheel to the a/c causing a nose down pitching. There's a lot of mass in the wheels and they're spinning quite fast, but I don't know if there's be enough to pitch the entire aircraft.

I hear DC3 poilts were warned against this because it caused the tires to creep around the wheel.

MikeKnight
22nd Mar 2005, 04:29
Holy Swiss Cheese Batman! This is a mine of caption competition fodder.

Lon More
22nd Mar 2005, 08:19
The US Air Forces experimentation with "catapult" launch systems met with mixed results.

Jer. If you get a chance go down to Dayton to the USAF Museum and take the Friday tour of the part of the collection not normally open to the public. There's a large ramp between two hangars where they experimented with an idea to decrease TO runs; a DC3 was pulled backwards up the ramp and when released the acceleration was considerably increased. I can't remember if they tried landing up it. Not one of their better ideas.

I must read things through before posting

Jerricho
22nd Mar 2005, 13:48
Thanks Lon :ok:

I may pop in there on my journey down to pick up that FJ40 Onan was talking about (Still there bud?)

Biggles Flies Undone
22nd Mar 2005, 13:56
Bit slow (http://www.pprune.org/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=163336) there..... http://www.stopstart.fsnet.co.uk/smilie/yawnface.gif

skydriller
22nd Mar 2005, 13:57
When there is too much information..........Kinda less funny now I know that 6 crew died in the accident.

Regards SD..:sad:

Onan the Clumsy
22nd Mar 2005, 14:05
There's a large ramp between two hangars where they experimented with an idea to decrease TO runs; a DC3 was pulled backwards up the ramp and when released the acceleration was considerably decreased. I can't remember if they tried landing up it. Not one of their better ideas. ...though perhaps a precursor to the ski jump launching system used by the RN for their Sea Harriers?

(btw, do you mean increased?)



FJ40 still there. You want me to ask the guy about it?

Jerricho
22nd Mar 2005, 14:14
I do.

Mrs J doesn't.

Paterbrat
22nd Mar 2005, 17:37
With regard to aeronautical experiments an MOD film was obtained of Russian trial with low level pallet extraction. The pallet contained a tank and crew at their stations who would be extracted in front of a load of observing Top Brass, immediately on sliding to a halt, start it's engine, though it may actualy have done this just prior to being pulled forth, then sally off looking for action.
Plane swoops over pallet yanked out slides to halt tanks sits with engine running, and sits, and sits... Crew all dead at their seats. Something to do with heart mountings not up to the sudden 'G' loading in the drop n sudden stop and burst aortas.

Well at least the extraction works Comrades.:ok:

Lon More
22nd Mar 2005, 18:32
Onan (btw, do you mean increased?)

They were launched downhill - it was a curved ramp, about 50feet high, the initial slope was about 45 degrees

Onan the Clumsy
22nd Mar 2005, 18:35
:confused: no, THIS decreased a DC3 was pulled backwards up the ramp and when released the acceleration was considerably decreased


....I think

Bre901
22nd Mar 2005, 19:11
Two words : bungee launch (http://www.osv-ch.org/activit/archive/2002/maub_02/album.html)

Monsieur le chat invisible, Altzheimer has not kicked in so hard that I don't remember I already posted it on AH&N

Lon More
23rd Mar 2005, 12:08
Onan

Oops, yes, sorry