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Gareth Blackstock
2nd Dec 2004, 14:43
Why is a Pound called a quid and why is a Dollar $ called a buck?

Anyone have any ideas where the slang came from?

Gaz

Grainger
2nd Dec 2004, 14:53
Once wrote someone a cheque for "Ten quid" instead of "Ten pounds" and the guy refused to accept it !

Some folks have no sense of humour :\

Anyway, we used to call them "Nicker" as in... "You owe me twenty nicker, mate !"

Vox Populi
2nd Dec 2004, 14:53
Quid is very old, Thomas Shadwell used the term back in the 17th Century. I guess it might be from the latin 'What?' But can't quite see how.


In England we ask for the bill and pay with a cheque
In the US we ask for the cheque and pay will a bill

vp

Rollingthunder
2nd Dec 2004, 14:54
Brewster's suggests it comes from 'quid pro quo', an equivalent amount for something, and also suggests that it originally referred to a sovereign.

Once upon a time Gaelic-speaking Irishmen in the British Army would refer to "my money" as "mo chuid": "cuid"(pronounced, very roughly, "quid") being an omnibus Gaelic word for "thing", "piece", "possession", "collection", "money" (as in this case) - or even "a bout of sexual intercourse"! English soldiers adopted the reference to what they heard as "quid", to mean the pound. (extract from "Semantic Enigmas")

Buck.

Some believe that the term buck for an American dollar originated from the use of silver dollars for bucks `markers used in poker,' others believe that the term buck `dollar' originated due to the fact that buckskins were used in trade, as a form of money, in early America. The term buck was then transferred to currency.

Capt.KAOS
2nd Dec 2004, 15:16
In case someone wants to know where the "dollar" came from: it was originated from a silver coin in the 16th century called "Joachimsthalers " or Thaler. As so many English words it was the Dutch version "Daler (or Daalder)" that lead to the English derivation "Dollar".

tony draper
2nd Dec 2004, 15:26
The term "pound note" was used in 1920's America or at least in New York as a slang term for a dollar bill, as readers of Damon Runyon will know.
:rolleyes:

Big Tudor
2nd Dec 2004, 15:30
Whilst we are on the subject, why do Americans refer to a cent as a 'penny'?

SLFguy
2nd Dec 2004, 15:46
Similar to Rollings answer....

Always understood that 'quid' was the price equivalent of 'quo' where 'quo' was whatever was for sale. ie 'quid' was a variable amount.... "quid pro quo"

Dunno when it got standardised to be a pound tho.

itchy kitchin
2nd Dec 2004, 15:50
Quid pro quo
= something for something

yintsinmerite
2nd Dec 2004, 16:16
Bill Bryson in his book 'Made In America', suggests that the dollar symbol $ is actually a corruption of a Spanish symbol consiting of a snake curled around a sword.

I'm convinced !!

five iron
2nd Dec 2004, 16:28
Qiud Pro Quo = This for That

Buster Hyman
2nd Dec 2004, 19:59
Don't know about pounds & dollars, but I believe they pulled the Euro out of some Belgians arse!

Grainger
2nd Dec 2004, 20:11
Isn't the word "Euro" a horrendous insult in one of those new states that's just joined the EU ?

Translates as "Your mother was a goat's arse" or something ?

BahrainLad
2nd Dec 2004, 20:17
Isn't the dollar shortly to be called "twennypence?" ;)

Kolibear
3rd Dec 2004, 07:50
Whats the origin of 'dimes' & 'nickels'??

teeteringhead
3rd Dec 2004, 08:46
Spanish symbol consiting of a snake curled around a sword. I was always more convinced by the corruption of the "ribbons round the column" on the Spanish Coat of Arms (http://flagspot.net/flags/es).html) Look at the one on the left and it makes sense...... was apparently on the original "pieces of eight" too.

yintsinmerite
3rd Dec 2004, 10:12
I was always more convinced by the corruption of the "ribbons round the column" on the Spanish Coat of Arms Look at the one on the left and it makes sense...... was apparently on the original "pieces of eight" too

Could be either I agree. I am suprised that our fellow JB'ers from the former colony haven't spoken on the matter

DubTrub
3rd Dec 2004, 11:30
A 25 cent piece (US) is called "two bits".
Now where's the logic in that?:confused:

The SSK
3rd Dec 2004, 12:07
Isn't the dollar shortly to be called "twennypence?"

When I was young, a half-a-crown (two shillings and sixpence, twelve and a half pee) was routinely called 'half a dollar'.

Skylark4
3rd Dec 2004, 21:56
Desk Jockey,
That probably dates from when the Dollar was four to the pound. I'm only 64 and I can remember the dollar at three to the pound. Looks like it may be back at that level soon.

Mike W