PDA

View Full Version : Pea Soup Foam


chiglet
22nd Oct 2004, 15:00
Just started some Pea Soup. Having steeped the peas overnight and thouroughly rinsing them, I started the soup.
Clean pan, peas, water, garlic, onions, herbs and smoked bacon [don't like ham shank].
Part wat through the heating process, a "foam crust" appears. As boiling point is reached, said foam dissipates.
What causes the foam? and why does it go?
watp,iktch

tony draper
22nd Oct 2004, 16:07
One hopes you fried up some sippets to go with same Mr Chiglets,we alus had sippets with pea soup at sea.
:rolleyes:

Feeton Terrafirma
22nd Oct 2004, 16:25
Definately sounds like it deserves a good chunky meat pie floating in the pea soup

yummmm:ok:

chiglet
22nd Oct 2004, 17:26
My meat pie is served with thick gravy, home made chips and "fallen" [semi mushy] peas.
Pea soup is [see above, plus Green oxo and dumplings! ]
watp,iktch

Rollingthunder
22nd Oct 2004, 18:07
Mmmmm....dumplings. What a great word. Say it a few times.

Anyway, the foam is impurities produced by the cooking of the peas. It should be skimmed off when it forms.

Off to the deli for lunch of chicken soup and dumplings me thinks as I'm not anywhere near a pie shop.

Hilico
22nd Oct 2004, 19:11
Look, I don't care about pea soup (except to ask, what's the difference between roast beef and pea soup? If they tried, most people could roast beef) - what I really want to know, chiglet, is WHAT DOES watp, iktch STAND FOR?

chiglet
22nd Oct 2004, 20:02
Hilico,
As posted umpteen times [by "others"]
We Aim To Please, It Keeps The Cleaners Happy :ok:
BTW, you can't pea[pee] soup, it's only the liquid content :rolleyes: , the rest goes 'tother way :{
watp,iktch

Hilico
22nd Oct 2004, 20:52
Ah! So, inadvertently, I have in a way put the answer in the question. How inadvertently clever I am. Thank you.
idbatp, ihtctta.

flapsforty
22nd Oct 2004, 23:07
Chiglet, according to Mr40, a Chef in a former life, the foam is solidified proteins (like what happens when you boil an egg) that come to the top with the rising air bubbles as the water heats up. As the steam gets hotter the bubbles burst and the solid small particles will get back into your soup.

No idea if it's true, but ever since he first told me I have faithfully defoamed starting stock to get clear broth.

gatfield
23rd Oct 2004, 01:35
In hell thats all you eat - pea soup. Pea soup with foam.

( I have pea phobia)

pigboat
23rd Oct 2004, 04:21
The best pea soup in North America used to be at the airport restaurant in Wabush, Labrador. The lady said she used to add "A little piece of salt beef, my son," in addition to the ham shank. We used to schedule the corporate jet through there every Thursday on the way to the board meeting in Cleveland, just so the company execs could pick up bowl of soup for lunch. :D

Solid Rust Twotter
23rd Oct 2004, 09:03
Flappy's got it.

It's a protein foam very much like the foam one gets on beer while it's being brewed and later poured. The reason it's a thin foam when poured is that most of the proteins have been filtered out and sent off to the Marmite/Brewer's yeast tablet factory. The action of the bubbles (expanding gases) causes the proteins to coagulate and make foam.

Fried bacon and spicy garlic sausage in the soup goes down a treat but will follow you around for a bit and haunt you at inopportune times.... :E