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View Full Version : easyJet cabin allowance - in reality?


Final 3 Greens
30th Jul 2004, 06:35
Given easyJet's new policy of "no weight limit, within reason", I thought that it would be interesting to start a thread so that we can compare our experiences to interpret what the "limit" really is.

This is what the easyJet website says:

"9.7. Unchecked Baggage

(a) Each Passenger is usually permitted to transport one standard piece of Unchecked Baggage in the cabin as hand Baggage to a maximum weight and size, in accordance with our Carrier's Regulations. Baggage which you carry on to the aircraft must fit under the seat in front of you or in an enclosed storage compartment in the cabin. Items determined by us to be of excessive weight or size will not be permitted in the cabin."

Pretty vague....

I've flown six times since the new rule came in and here are my findings:

#1 STN - suitcase far smaller than frame by check in, not questions asked

#2 AMS - as above

#3 STN - computer bag - no questions asked

#4 EDI - as above

#5 STN - standard IATA carry on 55x40x20 - check in agent asked me politely to demonstrate that it would fit the frame at check in, then weighed it at 12kg - no problem

#6 AMS - same bag and contents, check in agent said bag looked "too big" and when challenged that it was accepted at STN, produced a wooden testing box that looked as if it had been hand made by a schoolboy :-)

No problem getting the case to fit in this, but rather difficult to remove it - pretty hilarious.

Then weighed the bag that was 12 kg at STN, it now magically increased to 15.5kg at AMS, with the same contents! This was "too heavy". So I removed and hand carried the small laptop that the manufacturer says weighs 1.9kg and the bag then weighed 12.3kg (????)

There was then no problem.

So, it would seem that the limit is 55x40x20 and about 12-12.5kgs.

Anyone else had any other experiences?

Also, it would seem that there are some variances in the accuracy of the weighing scales - maybe the STN unit was at the bottom end of the tolerance range and the AMS at the top end?

witchdoctor
30th Jul 2004, 09:25
Already discussed on the 'easyjet scrap weight limit on hand luggage' thread. Can't be bothered to post a link to it.

Final 3 Greens
30th Jul 2004, 10:09
Dear Witchdoctor

Already discussed on the 'easyjet scrap weight limit on hand luggage' thread No it hasn't, that thread was about the concept, this thread is about the reality of the passenger experience since the change of rules.

slim_slag
30th Jul 2004, 10:54
Have been able to carry on a reasonable sized weekend bag a few times now, excellent! About time Europe woke up to the way it's been done in the States for years.

spork
30th Jul 2004, 18:46
A couple of days ago I read the Easyjet website general note, rather than the Ts and Cs and it said any weight, but dims of 55 x 40 x 20 apply. Any weight surely is any weight? People randomly applying rules that don't match reality is a serious problem. Having said that, I've never had anyone from any carrier ever show interest in my bag size and weight, and that's for c. 30yrs of travel.

Final 3 Greens
30th Jul 2004, 19:32
Hi Spork

The easy regs say "There is no weight restriction, within reasonable limits - i.e. a passenger must be able to place the piece of luggage safely in the overhead storage bins without assistance" - a pretty subjective rule, as it's asking the check in agent to take a view on this. 5' 2" weightlifters may well be miffed by this :O

The point of this thread is to see what happens when checking in, so that we can work out sensible rules of thumb from our experience.

I think that there are bound to be local interpretations of this new rule, but it should settle down in time.

However, if they are going to let me carry 12kg in a 55x40x20 case and a laptop too (also stated in the regs), then I for one think that is a pretty damn good deal, well in line with C class elsewhere.

spork
30th Jul 2004, 23:41
I understand the point of the thread fine thanks. It concerns me that you were gonged out at 15.5Kg which seems fairly speculative to me. I saw the website text you've mentioned too. Maybe the test has to be to ask you to raise the bag to the height of the overhead storage bins? I don't see why someone should choose a weight they think is okay. That's the same as having a weight restriction, but it'll vary by location and shift.

To make my stance clear, I'm actually a bit concerned about what other pax may put above my head. I've seen lockers come open in flight with the contents falling out. Perhaps the rule should be that you have to put YOUR bag above YOUR head? ;)

Final 3 Greens
31st Jul 2004, 06:42
It concerns me that you were gonged out at 15.5Kg I must look like a 9st weakling to a Dutch check in agent, tallest people in Europe, they tell me :}

Seriously, 15kgs is getting on the heavy side, IMHO and this episode is quite Nigel like, with the marketing people promoting a big concept and the Ops people dealing with the day to day reality - I wonder what the internal guidance is ... Departures Beckham, where are you when we need you?

takenthe5thamendment
4th Aug 2004, 23:26
I have just arrived back from a few weeks in Espana and flew with Easyjet from Liverpool...............huge bag as hand luggage and very heavy, lots of bottles of spirits inside on the way back - no questions or reference made to size or weight outbound in Liverpool or in Malaga on the return.

......And nope, I didn't risk the death of a fellow passenger by placing the bag in the overhead locker!

bealine
5th Aug 2004, 16:34
Have been able to carry on a reasonable sized weekend bag a few times now, excellent! About time Europe woke up to the way it's been done in the States for years.

The law in the States is different from here. In the USA, there are between 40 and 45 accidents and dangerous incidents reported every day regarding "carry-on" baggage. However, in he USA the airline has no responsibility - if you're injured the onus is on you to sue the owner of the bag.

In Europe, the carrier is responsible and, since the decapitation of many passengers in the Kegworth disaster, the CAA has advised an upper limit of 5.5kg - with astonishingly good reason!

You want to carry heavy weekender bags? - let the train take the strain. You want to fly? Abide by the safety regulations!

The FAA has, for years, taken the "soft" option - this is why it is widely believed that the escape chutes on 45% of US registered aircraft would fail to operate in an emergency - the FAA turns a blind eye to safety standards!!!

The evidence of this was displayed at Gatwick a few years ago when an "N" registered DC10 was overnighted in BA's maintenance hanger. Two crossmembers in the fuselage were badly perforated by corrosion, yet just three days before a General Certificate of Airworthiness had been issued in the USA!

EasyBaby
9th Aug 2004, 15:36
Personaly one of the worst concepts the company has come out with, if I could have it my way you'd be lucky to take on lip gloss, newspaper and a small present for the cabin crew!

Its only a matter of time till we have a heavy landing and the overloaded lockers come crashing down on top of you.

I have to bite my tounge when wise a*s slf come on board all smiley and smarmy because they think they're being clever taking on the ridiculously heavy and large hand luggage.

I would have expected more posts saying the same thing, as anything that compromises saftey is jumped on in these threads. But perhaps im wrong and having two tons of freight sitting above your head, of which you dont need half of it to be in the cabin with you anyway, is safe!!

next time im dead heading you'll see me sitting in my seat hard hat 'n' all!

Happy flying
EB ;)

spork
9th Aug 2004, 19:38
I can only agree with you that from the safety point of view this is worrying. As a passenger the good side of this change is that itís good to know that I donít have to worry about being 0.5Kg over, but then as I said above, Iíve never had a cabin bag weighed anyway. Maybe a sensible approach, announced or not, would be to weigh a cabin bag on check-in if that pax is NOT hold-checking a bag. That, presumably, would be the most likely scenario for a really heavy cabin bag. Apart from a heavy landing, Iíve seen lockers come open with turbulence, so I suppose itís only a matter of time before an incident occurs that makes someone think hard about this rule change.

Final 3 Greens
10th Aug 2004, 09:26
EasyBaby

think they're being clever taking on the ridiculously heavy and large hand luggage Surely if they have been accepted at check in, the luggage is not ridiculously heavy and large, since it complies with the policy as applied by the agent and agreed with the CAA?

I started this thread because I wanted to find out what the "limit" really is.

I know that the size limit is standard IATA 55+40+25 and the top end seems to be 12.5kgs.

AF allows 10kg in Y and more in C.

Do you object to the above on safety grounds?

spork
12th Aug 2004, 21:40
That may well be the standard IATA dims, but Easyjet say "one standard piece of hand baggage to a maximum size limit of 55x40x20cm" as I posted above. Perhaps that's why European schoolboys have to make the gauges in woodwork class?

Final 3 Greens
13th Aug 2004, 05:31
Spork

My typo - I meant 55+40+20 = 115cms, IATA standard.

As to why the schoolboy gauge, well that's anyone's guess ;)

EasyBaby
14th Aug 2004, 15:03
Having hand luggage in the cabin is a saftey risk, you cannot say otherwise. I think the details of the British Midland 737 crash higlighted that. One one section of overhead locker remained, the rest split emptying the contents over the heads of the pax, killing many and impeading their exit.

I know for a pax point of view its deemed great as they dont need to wait for luggage at the carousel, and they can shoot staight off. But they weight the luggage is a concern. They are allowed to take almost a limitless amount on board as long as they can lift it into the locker.
I have already had standing arguments with pax who have packed their entire lives into their bags. And when i tell them its for saftey they scoff.

Personally they should do away with the overhead bins and only be allowed to take on luggage that fits under their seat. At least that way it would stop lockers emptying onto pax heads.

although i work in the industry and do have an insight to what can happen when it goes wrong, i still won't take anything into the cabin than my shoulder bag that carries nothing more than a magazine, mobile (switched OFF) some sweets and the generall non discript items that fall to the bottom!! Only because i would hate to think that it was my bag that injured someone.

Anyway happy flying
Wear your hard hats!!

EB;)

skydriller
14th Aug 2004, 20:33
although i work in the industry and do have an insight to what can happen when it goes wrong, i still won't take anything into the cabin than my shoulder bag that carries nothing more than a magazine, mobile (switched OFF) some sweets and the generall non discript items that fall to the bottom!! Only because i would hate to think that it was my bag that injured someone.


Have you seen the size of the carry on luggage your average Hostie takes on board an aeroplane? You are an exeption.

There are huge double standards regarding carry on luggage size/weight, dsepending on who checks you in and what you wear. I travel alot, and when I go away for less that 5 days try to get everything in carry on. The one time I decide to travel in jeans over the W/E I get asked to weigh my carry on and get a bunch of hassle cause its 9.5 Kgs....... I would have used auto-check-in but it was not working........

Sorry, but if weight is a safety issue for carry on, it should be so for all airlines all of the time......and it isnt....

Regards, SD.

edited cause Ive had a few too many and cant spell....

Final 3 Greens
15th Aug 2004, 07:26
I think the details of the British Midland 737 crash higlighted that

That's a not particularly relevant example if I may say.

Aircraft with one good engine has said engine shutdown on short final and hits motorway embankment at high speed.

I'm surprised that anything remained closed under those circumstances. I'm also sure that the SRG of the CAA took this experience into account when agreeing to these new arrangements.

Anyway easyBabe, time to get back on topic.

So what is the weight limit that easy apply to cabin baggage.

Any more experiences recently?