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View Full Version : Are standby tickets really legal?


Onan the Clumsy
7th May 2004, 16:12
If the aeroplane fills up then late comers get standby tickets.

Now if you bought a ticket and couldn't make it to the airport on time and they sell your seat to a standby passenger, the airline has sold the item twice.

I can see why it's done and it benefits the airline and the standby passenger, but if you don't get to use your ticket, can't get a refund and the airline sells the seat again, how come that's not fraud?

After all, you buy "a seat". You don't buy "you in a seat". It's your seat whether you use it or not. What's the difference between this scenario and a garage selling a car to two people?

Grainger
7th May 2004, 16:52
Should at least give you the standby fare back - as you say, having bought your ticket full price the "seat" belongs to you, so if they sell it again you should get the money.

Makes sense to me. Mind you I come from a really weird planet where they have logic.

SLFguy
7th May 2004, 16:58
After all, you buy "a seat". You don't buy "you in a seat". It's your seat whether you use it or not. What's the difference between this scenario and a garage selling a car to two people?

Not an expert but I think you'll find that yes, 'you buy a seat', but said sale is conditional... I thinks it's the same conditions that will catch you out whenever/whatever , ie "See reverse"

con-pilot
7th May 2004, 17:06
Ah yes, that really, really small print on the back of the ticket that one must use a magnifying glass to read.

However I must agree, to be fair if one does not get one’s money back they should receive the price of the standby ticket.

Boss Raptor
7th May 2004, 18:45
If u consider that only in recent years have airlines been forced to adequately compensate those pax. who are offloaded due overbooking (with legitimate firm bookings) identifying 'the seat/ticket' as an entity - that legislation considered then the reverse should be true if your seat is sold to another in the scenario as detailed above...

Daysleeper
8th May 2004, 08:19
after all, you buy "a seat". You don't buy "you in a seat"

you dont buy a seat at all. or even a ride in a 'plane. You buy transport from A to B. The airline could put you in a bus (and often do) for all the law cares.

Approach_plate
8th May 2004, 09:45
you dont buy a seat at all. or even a ride in a 'plane. You buy transport from A to B. The airline could put you in a bus (and often do) for all the law cares.

So what happens when you go on the airlines website and select a seat??? In my view you have just paid for the seat you have selected.

G-ALAN
8th May 2004, 10:13
I've booked online many times and I've never once came across the senario where you 'select a seat'. It's always To, From and number traveling however I stand to be corrected.

Boss Raptor
8th May 2004, 11:05
Here you appear to be talking about your seat preference not actual contract to provide a service to carry the pax from A to B - you have selected and 'reserved' yr seat but the airline is not obliged to provide this exact seat position - they are however obliged to carry you from A to B

to save confusion maybe a phrase would be to 'buy a place/ticket to travel' on a flight - we are not referring to the physical 'seat'

...and not quite true UK law certainly requires that you are provided the service contracted i.e. travel by air (although not necessarily by that carrier or on the direct routing if you are re-booked onto another carrier)...you cant for example be dumped on a bus or train London Edinburgh instead of flying (if u are then you should get a refund and compensation) as this is breach of the service/contract with/by the airline

paulo
8th May 2004, 14:43
There are at least some airlines that won't rip you off if you want to change your ticket at the last minute (allowing them to sell the seat again). Easyjet do this, there may be others.

Jerricho
8th May 2004, 16:15
really small print on the back of the ticket that one must use a magnifying glass to read

I did actually get a magnifying glass out and read that one day. There was something regarding passengers rights, lost luggage and that each pax was entitled to a pot belly pig if the flight was over 12 hours long and passed over Iceland.

G-ALAN
8th May 2004, 17:33
Aer Lingus won't rip you off if you want to change at the last minute provided they have seats left on their next flight. I've change flights twice with them, both times were within an hour of departure. They even gave me a premium class ticket a few months back when I turned up at the check-in desk just as it was closing. They had sold my cattle class seat to someone else, thinking I wouldn't turn up, and gave me a first class ticket and an apology when I arrived at the check-in within about 2 minutes of closing time :}

Davaar
8th May 2004, 18:03
It is years since I was in that trade, but here is how it was.The place to look was and I expect still is the airline's tariff, which should be available at the counter. You are/were entitled to see it on demand. Just try to demand it and see what happens. Plan on spending a fair bit of time as you try to understand it, even if they do give it to you.

Animalclub
9th May 2004, 02:01
An airline ticket is just a receipt for monies paid and an indication to the the check-in chappie/chick as to where you are attempting to fly.