PDA

View Full Version : British and Ireland Lions


Dozy Bell
1st Jul 2001, 15:53
So where are all the gob***** Aussies now that they were taught a lesson in Rugby? It seems to me they only sing when they're winning!! I can't wait until the end of the summer when we've stuffed them in the Rugby and the Cricket, hopefully that will shut them up for a bit. http://www.pprune.org/ubb/NonCGI/tongue.gif

redsnail
1st Jul 2001, 15:59
Doubt it. :)

I also doubt that the English will win the cricket too.

------------------
reddo...feral animal!

Radar Departure2
1st Jul 2001, 19:53
Umm, Dozy, old bean, old chap, before you run off at the mouth, do have a look around to see if somebody has broached the topic before. Try the thread 29-13 for a start.

You have my email address; if you would like a small, or perhaps even a large wager on the result of the Ashes, give me a call. There's a good chap.

RD

putco
2nd Jul 2001, 20:36
Dozy, whip those blinkers off buddy.

Ever notice that any comparison of rugby strength is always made with reference to a Southern hemisphere team. I think it was also the Poms who coined the phrase "one swallow never made a summer" and did you realise that is has taken the best of your players from four different countries to beat one of ours!! Perhaps a Tri-Nations 15 vs the Lions??

The cricket? Well yeahh, you're doing damn well there too.....Ahemm.

HugMonster
2nd Jul 2001, 20:45
Dunno whether it was a Pom who coined it or not - my "Bookshelf Basics" just calls it a proverb. Anyway, I always thought is was "One swallow does not make a bj"... :)

FNQTech
3rd Jul 2001, 10:10
Far more importantly, did you see the thrashing the All Blacks gave France!!!

Seriously though, that was a far better spectacle.

Capt Vegemite
3rd Jul 2001, 10:35
putco

Dont remember if Aristotle emigrated to England but if he could help them play cricket I guess they'd claim him.

"For one swallow does not make a summer, nor does one day; and so too one day, or a short time, or a great deed, does not make a man blessed or happy."
Aristotle