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Real manual flying. Amazing 'interception'

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Real manual flying. Amazing 'interception'

Old 7th Nov 2015, 05:07
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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not reckless

I suppose they were mindful of the terrible consequences that an encounter with wake vortices would bring.
Interesting, amazing, daring, even skilled, and I think unnecessarily reckless.

Potentially dangerous (like driving a car), yes, but reckless, no.
The 380 has a huge wing and can fly slow, especially without cargo and most fuel, and careful planning ensured the jetpack pilots stayed out its zone of influence.
Many skeptical professional minds had to be sure of success before the flight was permitted.
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Old 7th Nov 2015, 05:13
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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This video will, no doubt, entice a lot of young kids to aspire to the wonderful world of the freedom of flight.
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Old 7th Nov 2015, 08:21
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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I'm interested to know why exactly you think that getting into the vortex would be such a big deal?

1. They would be flipped unceremoniously. So what? They either recover like a dart or they pull their parachute. It ain't going to damage them. Being flipped is more serious the bigger you are, not the smaller.

2. The big vortices come off the outside edge of the flap, not the wingtip, and they do so at landing speeds at high weight, not ~200kts
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Old 7th Nov 2015, 08:25
  #24 (permalink)  
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A short poll.
I have hung up my headset so will never fly the exotic A380; but possibly as a pax in the future. For those who might, or already do, I hope you enjoy it. But looking at this video of a lumbering White Whale, graceful though it might be, escorted by a small pod of dolphins as they formate and fly amongst the spume of clouds, I wonder who would rather be where.

I vote for the dolphins.
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Old 7th Nov 2015, 08:38
  #25 (permalink)  
 
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Tourist, surely you can't be serious?
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Old 7th Nov 2015, 10:13
  #26 (permalink)  
 
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Entirely serious.

And don't call me Shirley....

Why?

What do you think happens when you hit that vortex?
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Old 7th Nov 2015, 10:50
  #27 (permalink)  
 
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Thumbs up

Well done, excellent, thank goodness we have people that still know what life is for.
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Old 7th Nov 2015, 11:01
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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This could be interesting

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mpu2Z80Jzac

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mpu2Z80Jzac
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Old 7th Nov 2015, 11:02
  #29 (permalink)  
 
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Sorry, Tourist.
I, too, must call you on your point #2.
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Old 7th Nov 2015, 11:11
  #30 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Stanwell View Post
Sorry, Tourist.
I, too, must call you on your point #2.
Which bit?

The fact that the biggest vortices come off the outside edge of the flap, or that they are biggest when slow and heavy?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfY5ZQDzC5s

Watch this video for the landing aircraft with flaps deployed, and tell me where you think the vortices are....
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Old 7th Nov 2015, 12:16
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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I'm sure it wouldn't be too hard to imagine a scenario where a chain of events results in something catastrophic.

How directionally stable are these jetpacks when one of the motors cuts out?
How often do we hear of parachutists crashing into each other rendering someone unconscious (or killed)?
If one flyer did somehow get caught in a vortex would it be violent enough to render him unconscious?

It might inspire folks to take up aviation (or inspire people to do stupid things with much less preparation).

The benefit to the guys flying the 'wing' is the fantastic thrill of what they are doing against the zero risk to anyone else but themselves.
Isn't that sufficient reason?

Anyway, I won't be flying with Emirates if they think this is 100% safe.
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Old 7th Nov 2015, 12:26
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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GE publicity photo OP circa 1966.


Last edited by wanabee777; 8th Nov 2015 at 07:33.
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Old 7th Nov 2015, 12:28
  #33 (permalink)  
 
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This was 100% safe, nobody was injured/killed. The planning was professional and managed the risks to ensure a successful outcome. I think it shows that Emirates are a very professional outfit.

Flying itself is not 100% safe, so I guess NSEU won't be going flying again.
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Old 7th Nov 2015, 12:35
  #34 (permalink)  
 
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NSEU

I can accept that you think this could be dangerous for the jet pack guys, and would agree that the entire endeavour carries more risk than not doing it, but surely that is up to them?

Do you think that there is a risk to the A380?

You are aware that this was not a passenger flight, yes?
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Old 7th Nov 2015, 13:34
  #35 (permalink)  
 
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Tourist,
Re vortices: They are, of course, a consequence of Angle of Attack.
If flaps are deployed, then that part of the wing will have a relatively greater AoA.
So yes, the flap vortices will be somewhat greater than those from the wingtips.

Either way, not a good idea to mess with either of them if you're in another aircraft or just wearing a Batman suit.
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Old 7th Nov 2015, 13:46
  #36 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Stanwell View Post
Either way, not a good idea to mess with either of them if you're in another aircraft or just wearing a Batman suit.
Yes, they will flick you out, but I'm not sure they would cause any harm beyond a couple of snap rolls, and the guys already have parachutes ready to go.

I'm quite sure they felt their way in gently, and you can feel the effect of the vortices even in an aircraft as you start to enter them let alone in a tiny jetpack.

These guys are not idiots or suicidal.
Do them the courtesy of not assuming that they have not thought this through.
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Old 7th Nov 2015, 14:06
  #37 (permalink)  

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When it comes to aviation, there are always self proclaimed experts who do nothing but talk about it.

The real experts don't talk about it, but simply think it through then go out and do it.

Thank goodness for the latter!
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Old 7th Nov 2015, 14:17
  #38 (permalink)  
 
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Says Shy with nearly 10,000 posts,
Well don't just sit there talking about it - Clear to start. Off you go!
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Old 7th Nov 2015, 14:23
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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Rossy flew Mirage, Tigers, and Hunters, 747...not sure what he currently flies for Swiss, but he is definitely a qualified, professional pilot, well aware of risks and more than familiar with meticulous planning.

His first flight tests of his carbon fiber wings and RC-model jet engines were probably - from a conservative viewpoint - a bigger risk than what he is doing now, after continuously improving his setup, and with more experience using it.

I agree that wake/wingtip vortices may not be such a huge danger for a human-sized flying object equipped with a parachute. This formation flight was probably safer, better planned, and better executed than many other flights worldwide. Amazing to watch

Regarding manual flight and Mk 1 eyeball: according to himself, he controls his "flight control surfaces" (i.e. his body) with his eyes. He looks in the direction of where he wants to fly, and his body moves accordingly, a very intuitive process. Flying by the seat of one's pants.

Last edited by deptrai; 7th Nov 2015 at 15:15.
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Old 7th Nov 2015, 14:54
  #40 (permalink)  

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Stanwell, I'm not expert enough but too old, with only forty two years of aviation under my belt, thirty seven of it for a living. But in my younger day I'd certainly have loved to have had a go, obviously having practiced the necessary skills well in advance and made the other necessary preparations as well as this team obviously did. But I have a fair amount of close formation experience, in fact the military thought I was good enough to teach others how to do it, in both fixed wing and rotary wing. These days I fly far less exciting stuff, mainly in straight lines.

Tourist, who was informed of some basic aerodynamic facts will also be very well acquainted with flying very close to the downwash of much larger aircraft.
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