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-   -   Plane flips over after crash-landing in Somalia (https://www.pprune.org/accidents-close-calls/647858-plane-flips-over-after-crash-landing-somalia.html)

Dimitri Cherchenko 18th Jul 2022 12:12

Plane flips over after crash-landing in Somalia
 
A plane has crashed and flipped over on landing at the airport in Somalia's capital but there were no fatalities among the more than 30 people on board.
https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune....93792e53b3.jpg
BBC News

DaveReidUK 18th Jul 2022 13:29

1992 former Lufthansa Cityline F50, been around the houses a bit since then.

* Informational post only, no judgement implied. :O


Lexif 18th Jul 2022 14:23

More pics at avherald: Accident: Jubba F50 in Mogadishu on Jul 18th 2022, flipped over on landing
Nose gear is missing a wheel and turned 90į, and left main gear missing. The fuselage looks surprisingly intact, but there is a tear in the skin next to the right prop. Glad there were no serious injuries.

oceancrosser 18th Jul 2022 16:31

Second F50 crash in the region in two days. If this continues the F50 will be extinct soon.
East Africa has not been kind to the Fokker 50.

pax britanica 18th Jul 2022 19:37

Extra ordinary pics, F50 fuselage seems to be a very rugged construction being seemingly intact after landing on its back and having both wings torn off. I suppose it is similar if not the same as the F27 /FH227 forebears designed and built in the 1950s where ruggedness for this type of aircraft was essential given the kind of places they would routinely operate to. Mogadishu sounds an incredibly scary place to operate into.


Doors to Automatic 18th Jul 2022 19:53

Thatís not a brilliant day at the office.

I wonder if the 18kt tailwind had anything to do with the crash?

A0283 18th Jul 2022 21:47


Originally Posted by pax britanica (Post 11263847)
Extra ordinary pics, F50 fuselage seems to be a very rugged construction being seemingly intact after landing on its back and having both wings torn off. I suppose it is similar if not the same as the F27 /FH227 forebears designed and built in the 1950s where ruggedness for this type of aircraft was essential given the kind of places they would routinely operate to. Mogadishu sounds an incredibly scary place to operate into.

The Fokker 50 is very rugged indeed. One day at Schiphol I saw one landing with only its NLG and left MLG leg. Solid piloting skill gave it a silky landing. Replacing a piece of skin and part of a frame and it was ready to fly again.

It was certainly not the same, Wikipedia will give you some basic upgrade information. Much improved engines and modern cockpit and modern interiors are examples.

One thing that did not change was the general layout with the high wing and long MLG legs required for the rough and unimproved runways. These required for the original F27 Friendship being the successful DC3 replacement.





hans brinker 18th Jul 2022 22:14


Originally Posted by DaveReidUK (Post 11263626)
1992 former Lufthansa Cityline F50, been around the houses a bit since then.

* Informational post only, no judgement implied. :O

Flew that plane for Denim Air.

hans brinker 18th Jul 2022 22:15


Originally Posted by pax britanica (Post 11263847)
Extra ordinary pics, F50 fuselage seems to be a very rugged construction being seemingly intact after landing on its back and having both wings torn off. I suppose it is similar if not the same as the F27 /FH227 forebears designed and built in the 1950s where ruggedness for this type of aircraft was essential given the kind of places they would routinely operate to. Mogadishu sounds an incredibly scary place to operate into.

Built like a brick, flew like one too.

bluesideoops 19th Jul 2022 01:24

Fokker 50 Crash Somalia
 
Jubba Airways Fokker 50 by the looks of things https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-africa-62212987

DaveReidUK 19th Jul 2022 07:25


Originally Posted by bluesideoops (Post 11263975)
Jubba Airways Fokker 50 by the looks of things https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-africa-62212987

See photo in post #1.

Herod 19th Jul 2022 09:49


Originally Posted by hans brinker (Post 11263910)
Built like a brick, flew like one too.

Hans: agree with the first staement, not the second. I never flew the '50, but have some 6,000 hours on the '27. An aeroplane that would never let you down.

Amazing that there were no serious injuries. Says a lot for that fuselage.

flyems 19th Jul 2022 10:43

The 2013 Ethiopian Airforce AN12 incident was thought to have been the result of a tailwind gust.

hans brinker 20th Jul 2022 00:28


Originally Posted by Herod (Post 11264108)
Hans: agree with the first staement, not the second. I never flew the '50, but have some 6,000 hours on the '27. An aeroplane that would never let you down.

Amazing that there were no serious injuries. Says a lot for that fuselage.

Well, the way I normally said was flew like a truck. Rotate definitely required both hands. Engine failure required so much rudder pressure I would normally use both legs, full aileron into dead engine, so uncross armes and hold the wheel upside down. Extend flaps and don't trim the wheel 3 times around and you need both hands to keep the nose down. Flew the Dash 8 at the same time, and was so much easier to control, but the cockpit was lousy.
F50 Cockpit design is still better than anything else I have seen.

avionimc 20th Jul 2022 11:57


Originally Posted by hans brinker (Post 11264455)
full aileron into dead engine

You probably meant aileron into the good engine (bank into the good engine), in order to raise the dead engine.
https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/i...5ofQA&usqp=CAU




hans brinker 20th Jul 2022 18:40


Originally Posted by avionimc (Post 11264635)
You probably meant aileron into the good engine (bank into the good engine), in order to raise the dead engine.
https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/i...5ofQA&usqp=CAU

https://youtu.be/Wbu6X0hSnBY

well, thatís embarrassing. Yes, full aileron to raise the dead engine.
after accelerating much less control travel required to fly, but the first few hundred feet climbing at V2 were challenging.

meleagertoo 20th Jul 2022 22:20

Jeez! Is Mog really still so unsafe that people accept 18Kt tailwinds to avoid overflying the city? That makes the place damn hazardous for half the year! I really didn't like that time of year, it did expose you to small-arms fire from the city no matter what you did and individual approaches like mine irritated the **** out of the US 'controllers' who wanted to drag you over half the country on a 20 mile DME arc and then over the entire city at 1500ft on finals! You couldn't make it up!

This was my verion of dealing with the SW monsoon wind, a month or so before the Blackhawk incident. Can't see why a little Fokker shouldn't do much the same on such a long runway but clearly not an option for jets.

Not much progress there in thirty years then. Makes me wonder why did we bother?


https://cimg8.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune....f5ebdda245.jpg

wideman 27th Jul 2022 15:38

Video:


tried to post video, but it might not show up. Check twitter feed for
@SomaliGuardian for video

ItsonlyMeagain 27th Jul 2022 17:08

Looking at the video, Iíd guess itís not so much the tailwind, but the fact it appears to land short of the runway and the then higher surface disassembles the aircraft in short measure. Stops quickly though.

Me

FUMR 27th Jul 2022 19:39

Not only does it land short but quite heavily too. I'd say that a tailwind could well have contributed to that outcome.


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