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Cirrus parachutes into the Solent

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Cirrus parachutes into the Solent

Old 1st Jun 2020, 07:33
  #21 (permalink)  
lsh
 
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It needs a 'chute release, for activating after touchdown.
Was a big worry for Apollo missions.
I believe F111 had release too.

lsh
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Old 1st Jun 2020, 07:39
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by extralite View Post
.. Their reasoning is that apparently survival rate so far is 100 percent under a cirrus chute. ...
Sadly this is not the case - several aircraft have caught fire under chute resulting in the death of the occupants.
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Old 1st Jun 2020, 08:42
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by dash34 View Post
Sadly this is not the case - several aircraft have caught fire under chute resulting in the death of the occupants.
Wrong: there has been no such incident.

There has been one fatal accident in which a non-survivable mid air collision triggered the parachute and caused a fire.
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Old 1st Jun 2020, 09:57
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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Looking at the number of people on the beach, would imagine that paid a factor. Imagine finding a safe space and dealing with whatever had gone wrong was not a real option
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Old 1st Jun 2020, 10:46
  #25 (permalink)  
 
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Interesting to review his day out on Flight Radar. Down to Exeter area along the coast with a good tailwind and return into quite a headwind. Flight ended 3 miles from destination, makes one wonder if he had enough fuel and suffered from ‘Get home itis’?
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Old 1st Jun 2020, 11:59
  #26 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by broadreach View Post
You have to wonder why, once the parachute had dragged the aircraft to the beach, nobody seems to have had the presence of mind to deflate it. Which then brings one to a second question: can Cirrus parachutes be recycled?
They were probably awaiting an armed response unit to arrive on the scene to chute it....


Hat and coat....
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Old 1st Jun 2020, 12:34
  #27 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by NutLoose View Post
They were probably awaiting an armed response unit to arrive on the scene to chute it....


Hat and coat....
You won't get a riser out of me with that one...
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Old 1st Jun 2020, 12:56
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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Your response will remain shrouded - but let's not open that can-o-peas.

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Old 1st Jun 2020, 17:14
  #29 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Jonzarno View Post
Wrong: there has been no such incident.

There has been one fatal accident in which a non-survivable mid air collision triggered the parachute and caused a fire.
And the guy that looks like he pulled the ‘chute too late and landed in Orcutt school playground.
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Old 1st Jun 2020, 17:28
  #30 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Waltzer View Post
What do you think?

Fortunately everyone was ok.

One has to wonder why these Cirrus’ are crashing, it’s such a new design but many are coming to grief?

There is also, of course, the added consideration of the aircraft landing on persons under parachute (fortunately it didn’t).

Not that new a design, been built since 2001

Ttfn
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Old 1st Jun 2020, 18:04
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by ivor toolbox View Post
Not that new a design, been built since 2001

Ttfn
Shows how old I am!!
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Old 1st Jun 2020, 18:04
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Waltzer View Post
And the guy that looks like he pulled the ‘chute too late and landed in Orcutt school playground.
That was a post impact fire resulting, as you say, from an attempted deployment well below the minimum deployment height during a base to final stall / spin. The assertion to which I was replying was that there had been cases in which aircraft had been on fire under the chute.

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Old 1st Jun 2020, 19:45
  #33 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Waltzer View Post

There is also, of course, the added consideration of the aircraft landing on persons under parachute (fortunately it didn’t).
do you think it’s better to get a plane falling on you without a chute?
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Old 2nd Jun 2020, 05:32
  #34 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by extralite View Post
The cirrus training says always pull the chute unless directly over a field. That was drummed in. Their reasoning is that apparently survival rate so far is 100 percent under a cirrus chute. Not the case with their forced landings. I know i would pull the chute rather than ditch or land on a less than ideal beach such as that situation.
Yes. In the early days of the CAPS system, Cirrus found people were dying when they could have been saved by the chute. They found pilots were reluctant to use the system. New procedures and training, including the "CAPS available" callout seems to have largely fixed that.

Of course plenty of aircraft must have been destroyed when they would have managed a power off landing, but you don't know in advance which is which. Lives have been saved at the cost of some additional aircraft destroyed.
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Old 3rd Jun 2020, 08:51
  #35 (permalink)  
 
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Regrettably, there is much less data on the number of successful forced landings than the number of unsuccessful ones, which tends to skew opinion somewhat. When I've flown a Cirrus, I have absolutely maintained that I might use the CAPS in some situations, but my default option would be a proper forced landing with the hope of using the aircraft again, and I have never flown in situations where I have relied on planning to use CAPS (eg IMC down to the ground). That said, one has to be (a) good enough and (b) in currency at such things to take that route. A gliding background and history of successful field landings certainly informs my perspective.
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Old 3rd Jun 2020, 14:39
  #36 (permalink)  
 
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Talking of Cirrus, someone just bought a new one.


The paint scheme is pretty awful. I wonder if it has a purple CAPS canopy as well. One way to find out!


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Old 3rd Jun 2020, 18:26
  #37 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by extralite View Post
The cirrus training says always pull the chute unless directly over a field. That was drummed in. Their reasoning is that apparently survival rate so far is 100 percent under a cirrus chute. Not the case with their forced landings. I know i would pull the chute rather than ditch or land on a less than ideal beach such as that situation.

Yes, except I didn't write "ditch or land on a less than ideal beach". I said (paraphrase) glide toward the beach first and thereby have a better chance of landing on terra firma than just pull without thinking and ride down as a passenger with absolutely no control, possibly to the detriment of oneself or more importantly the people below. The photo of the aircraft inverted should make the risk to occupants obvious, people rarely drown on dry land.

BRS systems are a great tool but in too many cases people think they abrogate all responsibility. The pilot chooses to take the risk, the innocents below do not.
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Old 4th Jun 2020, 16:22
  #38 (permalink)  
 
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BRS systems are a great tool but in too many cases people think they abrogate all responsibility. The pilot chooses to take the risk, the innocents below do not.
Pray tell, why is a BRS equipped aircraft any different with respect to “the innocents below” when faced with non-BRS structural failure, or as we’ve seen recently, someone not putting the gear down then doing a go-around over a city suburb?

In life, we take risks every time we walk out the door. Unfortunately, that’s the way it is.

The attitude of aircrew was the same when ejection seats were first introduced in that they’d stay with the aircraft through ‘machismo’ (I can recover this) rather than the easier “Martin Baker let-down.”
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Old 4th Jun 2020, 17:19
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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I suspect that BRS doesn't have any inbuilt capability to avoid schools and hospitals.
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Old 4th Jun 2020, 20:33
  #40 (permalink)  
 
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We had one come down behind our house a few years back - https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-englan...shire-25344780
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