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Old 16th May 2017, 21:32   #81 (permalink)
 
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Landing on a lux yacht one would expect all checks to be done in preparation for your arrival to have been completed.
I am sure they had "Deck Clearance" via radio before landing was initiated.

I would, after the event, if no lives were in danger, to make my way at max swimming speed to the boat and proceed, with extreme violence, to show the Capt. how an anchor works. JOKE!
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Old 16th May 2017, 23:31   #82 (permalink)


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Originally Posted by albatross View Post
In this case..who fabricated this cover or certified that it was safe and properly secured?
According to the local newspaper (I live in the area), it was just installed. Made by a local sail manufacturer, and installed on Monday the 8th, accident happened on Wednesday the 10th.
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Old 17th May 2017, 06:50   #83 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by DOUBLE BOGEY View Post
I liked the press conference. Praising the Norwegian Emergency services is a natural thing to do if you feel that your life or the life of your friend was saved by their help. I have not met Q but he seems a decent guy with a great beard.

Some really stupid arrogant posts on this thread. I have spent a lot of time over the ocean in a helicopter. Done the HUET thing a few times. However to listen to the reality of an unexpected ditching is very interesting having only imagined what it would be like.

I suspect the vitriolic posts on this thread are more to do with envy that three friends can up sticks, do a great flight to a super yacht just because they can. (Albeit as Q says, it ended with an accident).

I once took a Tesco step carrier bag into my disc on a night HEMS tak-off. No vibration but the noise was so dramatic my arse had eaten most of the seat cushion during the subsequent reject.

On the hero subject I recall another helicopter pilot and I am ashamed to say I have forgotten his name. He jumped into the maelstrom of water in the centre of the AH001 jacket (I think I have that right) to try and save some Bears who were trapped in there.only because he was the only one with an immersion suit on. I think he is a fixed wing pilot now and I recall talking to him on the ATC as he swanned over the NS on his way to somewhere exotic. He was also a really nice guy. He did get a medal for his incredible selfless act.

Good job Q and ignore the tossers on this thread!

My memory fades but I think the guy was Max (or was it Curtis ?) and it was on the MCP01. Early to mid 90s.
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Old 17th May 2017, 08:03   #84 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by DOUBLE BOGEY View Post
Good job Q and ignore the tossers on this thread!
Agreed! Seems some on here have an axe to grind.
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Old 17th May 2017, 12:56   #85 (permalink)
 
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The incident just above was on MCP01 in Feb 1998.
At that time is was run in unmanned mode with the crew visiting by helicopter. One of the maintenance crew fell into the large space between the jarlan wall and central core. The standby vessel launched an FRC and one of the crew crawled / swam through the holes in the jarlan wall and tried to rescue him. Both died after spending some 40 minutes in the water.

The helicopter co-pilot was Neil Gordon and seems to be generally 'unsung'. The crewman from the FRC was awarded a George Medal.

The helicopter pilot
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Old 17th May 2017, 16:00   #86 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by crab@SAAvn.co.uk View Post
If he did go back in (do we know that for sure) 3 times (why when there were only 2 others in it).
First time to activate the float switch. Second time after the aircraft settled under the floats, to look for the others, unsuccessfully. When he surfaced second time, one of them was up. Third time to look once more, he saw an arm, yanked on it and out came the third. No doubt beneath your standards, you would probably have only needed one breath of air to save both pax, the iPad, the logbook and the fuel receipts.

It's worth noticing that the second person to surface did so by himself, but was the one who needed CPR just minutes later. Exhaustion, hypothermia, previous conditions perhaps. It ain't over till it's over.
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Old 17th May 2017, 17:36   #87 (permalink)
 
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https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rc...Nc1XlZsWMtcmzg
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Old 17th May 2017, 19:06   #88 (permalink)
 
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Mmmmm.....
Your point Alphanumeric?
You saying there is a relationship between an engine failure 14 years ago and an accident involving a loose cover? Q has some 15,000 hours and a wide range of experiences. Have you left your armchair yet?
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Old 17th May 2017, 19:34   #89 (permalink)
 
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Others have already said it but I would suggest to those that find relief by criticising the actions of a fellow pilot that they might consider how they might fare when required to face a foreign press corps, in shock, following an accident. They should understand that in Norway, there is a certain sensitivity in respect of helicopter accidents. Well done Q, you responded well on behalf of our industry. Thank you.
Pedro
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Old 17th May 2017, 20:22   #90 (permalink)
 
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Who required him to face a foreign press corps ? How ?
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Old 17th May 2017, 21:00   #91 (permalink)
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Another view on web forums is that most problematic posters are either the those with the highest number of posts or the least.

Alphanumeric, I’ve just scrolled up the page and I see you have a total 28 posts thus far on PPRuNe with 9 of those attacking Q in this thread alone.

If life hasn’t turned out for you in the manner you wished – keep it to yourself. If you have a problem with him, drive over to Denham and speak with him on his return. We’ve grown tired of this nonsense.
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Old 17th May 2017, 21:35   #92 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by RMK View Post

Alphanumeric, Iíve just scrolled up the page and I see you have a total 12 posts thus far on PPRuNe with 9 of those attacking Q in this thread alone.
Unfortunately, you can't always judge a poster by his number of posts. alphanumeric, and his many other alter-egos, has posted hundreds, if not thousands, of times on PPRuNe. However, for some reason, he likes to delete his previous posts as he goes along.
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Old 17th May 2017, 21:41   #93 (permalink)
 
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I think this thread is done now at least until the accident report comes out.
It almost feels like a PR stunt with press releases and magazine articles that really do go a bit far.
I did laugh at the heli web articles last paragraph in that industry experts reckon he landed the helicopter in such a way to dissipate the energy of the rotors. Don't you just love those industry experts!
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Old 17th May 2017, 22:50   #94 (permalink)
 
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"The helicopter landing almost upside down in the water, was speculated by some industry experts contacted by Heliweb Magazine in relation to the accident as possibly an intentional move by Smith to dissipate the power of the spinning rotor blades that would destroy themselves on impact."

Most hilarious comment I have read about this accident - glad Q and the others are ok and they all make a speedy recovery.
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Old 18th May 2017, 18:32   #95 (permalink)
 
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Yet if you read about ditching a helicopter it does say to do exactly that.

A normal flare is performed, and then as the helicopter settles into the water the pilot decreases rotor RPM to minimum and uses lateral cyclic to roll the aircraft on its side. This causes the blades to strike the water and immediately stop turning, so that people are not hit by turning blades while evacuating from the aircraft. Most helicopters will sink fairly quickly since there are not normally large spaces to trap air in a helicopter. This makes it critical that everyone is briefed in how to get clear of the helicopter and get to the surface of the water.
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Old 18th May 2017, 18:53   #96 (permalink)
 
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Yup, actually the R44 Pilot Operating Manual explicity says to do this "Apply lateral cyclic when aircraft contacts water to stop rotors"
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Old 18th May 2017, 19:41   #97 (permalink)
 
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It isn't lateral either way, but on the side that will encourage the transmission to rip away from the occupants and the opposite blade to fold away from the cockpit. For a Bell or R44 that is right lateral and for Eurocopter left.
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Old 18th May 2017, 19:53   #98 (permalink)
 
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On its side yes could understand that but completely upside down as per their reference ??
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Old 18th May 2017, 21:03   #99 (permalink)
 
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Ditching

If it's a controlled ditching (unlike this one) then rolling the thing over would be daft especially if it is likely it will stay upright. As soon as it rolls your chance of survival significantly decrease.
Maybe a flimsy Robinson gearbox might get ripped out with a roll but unlikely to happen to anything more robust.
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Old 18th May 2017, 21:50   #100 (permalink)
 
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The video clearly shows it was not a controlled ditching, and the aircraft entered the water more or less inverted. The conference gives a clue as to why there was not more control available - based on the fact that the cyclic was thrashing around at 6 Hz!
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