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Old 19th Mar 2011, 17:49   #1 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: UK
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What is a Calendar Month?

Hi, I'm trying to find out the definition of a calendar month for flight crew limitations as I am getting pretty close to the limit & might not be able to fly my full schedule next month.

Does it mean 30 days or for example all hour flown 10 February - 9 March?

I know the weekly limit is Monday to Sunday for example, but what about the month limit as February is a short month?

Any help will be appreciated.
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Old 19th Mar 2011, 23:12   #2 (permalink)
 
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The legal definition of Calendar Month is:

A period from a specified day in one month to the day numericaly corresponding to that day in the following month.
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Old 19th Mar 2011, 23:26   #3 (permalink)
 
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Since we deal with dozens of countries here the answer may vary... for the US FAA a Calendar Month is one of the 12 divisions of a year... 1 January - 31 January, 1 February - 28(29) February, etc. etc.
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Old 20th Mar 2011, 06:43   #4 (permalink)

 
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You're not going to find the answer varying. A calendar month is the month you see on the calendar, such as the beginning of July to the end of July.

If another period of time is specified, then it will be clear, such as the preceding 30 days. In that case, look back 30 days. If you're restricted to X amount of flying in a calendar month, or a calendar year, then its the month or year as you see it on the calendar. Don't read any more into the limitation than is already spelled out by the term itself.
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Old 20th Mar 2011, 08:26   #5 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
A period from a specified day in one month to the day numericaly corresponding to that day in the following month.
That has always been my understanding, in terms of contracts, notice periods, etc. It's a variable, and therefore potentially unsatisfactory, measurement as it could be any number of days from 28 to 31.
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Old 20th Mar 2011, 09:47   #6 (permalink)
 
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SN3 that definition will work in the US, and most other places, I'm not willing to say that it will work everywhere because I simply don't know everything and everyone well enough to bet my word on it, I know US regs. However, even within the US legal system you'll find both definitions as accepted in different cases, you can use a legal dictionary to find this stuff.

Anyone involved with aviation in the US or operating under the FAAs oversight should only comply with the idea that it's the first of a "named" month to the last of a "named" month.
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Old 20th Mar 2011, 12:18   #7 (permalink)

 
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One can say "in a month's time" and mean any number of things.

When one states "in a calendar month," however, one specifically refers to the period of time from the beginning of the month until the end of the month. The period of time varies with the month; if it's February, excepting Leap Year, then it's a 28 day period. If it's November, it's a 30 day period from the beginning of November until the end of that month.

A calendar month is not from the middle of one month into the next (although you're right; you'll find contradicting legal definitions saying otherwise, and saying for). For example, a calendar month is not from the eighth of July until the 7th of August; that period comprises two separate partial calendar months. It may cover a month's duration, but not a calendar month. A calendar month could be the month of July, beginning to end, or the month of August, beginning to end. Or one could specify a 30 day period. When the term "calendar month" is used, the use of "calendar" with the word "month" specifies that the month is defined by one of the 12 designated months of the year, and the month in question takes place from the designated beginning of that month, until the designated end.

If I have a medical certificate which was obtained on the 5th of january, for example, and expires six calendar months after the month in which it was issued, for example, the six calendar months begin after the month of issuance. If it was issued in january, my six months begin in February, and comprise Februay, March, April, May, June, and July. My certificate expires at the end of July, at the end of the 6th calendar month after the month in which it was issued.

Quote:
However, even within the US legal system you'll find both definitions as accepted in different cases, you can use a legal dictionary to find this stuff.
Not just in the US legal system. For example, in McCombie v. Queen, CanLII - 2000 CanLII 354 (T.C.C.), the Canadian court kicks the idea around citing several other decisions and definitions in context, then finally concludes:

Quote:
I cannot accept the proposition that a portion of a month is a calendar month.
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Old 21st Mar 2011, 06:18   #8 (permalink)
 
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SN3, I'm not disagreeing with you, and I believe you're absolutley correct when it comes to our regulations (I assume you need to conform to the FAA ones as well). I, and every operator and inspector I've ever met follows the first day to last day of a named month principle. I just don't want to make my statements definitive of every country in the world, where the words may have a different meaning (or things are lost in traslation).
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