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Old 17th Mar 2017, 17:17   #1 (permalink)
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Can I fly an airplane in the UK with an FAA PPL?

Title kind of says it all, but to expand.

I am British, I have an FAA PPL (my only flying licence), I am domiciled overseas.

My question is simple - assuming I can find someone to rent me an airplane - can I legally do so in the UK.

I ask as I have been reading all sorts of odd things about JAR, EASA and some kind of down on US registered planes, certain ratings and such - Googling the subject seems to give lots of irate articles about the issue from, mainly, 2005 to 2010 then quiet.

Does anyone have a direct answer to my questiion.

Thanks in advance.

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Old 17th Mar 2017, 18:43   #2 (permalink)
 
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As the rules presently stand; Assuming that the April 2017 deadline is extended to April 2019 (which I have no real source confirming either way) [http://www.peter2000.co.uk/aviation/easa/] - if you can find an N-reg plane in the UK, you should be able to rent it completely legally with an FAA certificate.

If April 2017 deadline goes ahead, then as of April 2017, it will depend where the N-reg is based, if it is in the UK, you will need both EASA licence AND FAA certificate to fly the aeroplane in UK airspace. Funnily enough however, if the aeroplane is based in the UK, but you rent it from another EU country (ie: France), technically you only require the FAA certificate providing that you don't fly in UK airspace. Oddly enough - but irrespective of the question, an N-reg based in the UK can be flown in UK airspace, with a UK issued EASA licence.

(ps: anyone who has more information may contradict me, but I did spend considerable time looking at purchasing an N-reg in early Jan)
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Old 17th Mar 2017, 19:12   #3 (permalink)

I'd rather be floating

 
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If only we could form some sort of international club, which could agree that "an aeroplane is an aeroplane" and "a pilot is a pilot". We could give it a name with some initials, which seems to be the way things are done in the aviation world - how about "ICAO" for starters?
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Old 17th Mar 2017, 19:52   #4 (permalink)
 
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Could the FAA licenced pilot fly a G reg aircraft in the UK? Or in th US?
A complete and utter shambolic dogs breakfast.
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Old 17th Mar 2017, 20:24   #5 (permalink)
 
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Could we form a new state of registry which would actually adhere to ICAO, with our own registration prefix. Adhere to maintenance schedule as set out per the manufacturer, and have a sensible "minor modification" system, along with adhering to STCs set out in FAAland... Make it a worldwide thing (as ICAO aimed to do).

Without all the bureaucracy and money wasted on paperwork...

(And no I don't mean something sensible like the "permit to fly" I mean something that is accepted worldwide)

Anyway, silly ideas aside, some country specific differences are good to have, for instance in NZ the low flying (due wx) and the terrain awareness (to avoid mountains). It's also quite useful to have local differences training.
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Old 17th Mar 2017, 21:45   #6 (permalink)

I'd rather be floating

 
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Originally Posted by alex90 View Post
Anyway, silly ideas aside, some country specific differences are good to have ...
Can't argue with that - in the southern UK "dressed to survive" means you've got a woolly jumper, a mobile phone and a credit card. In other parts of the world you need serious winter gear, a fish hook and a gun - it's worth being trained as necessary in the differences!
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Old 17th Mar 2017, 23:43   #7 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crash one View Post
Could the FAA licenced pilot fly a G reg aircraft in the UK? Or in th US?
A complete and utter shambolic dogs breakfast.
It certainly used to be the case that a US qualified pilot had PPL privileges VFR in the UK and could legally rent a G-reg . Did that change when I wasn't paying attention?
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Old 18th Mar 2017, 00:43   #8 (permalink)
 
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I really hope the deadline gets pushed back again, I'm just to old, impatient and really can't be arsed starting over training and taking exams for a PPL & IR issued by a EU agency to replace the FAA one I struggled to get in the first place. And I also dread the nonsense I would have to comply with if that little shytebag in Edinburgh gets her way and throws us to the mercy of the Brussels bureaucrats for licensing.

Best let sleeping dogs lie, it's working fine the way it is.
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Old 18th Mar 2017, 11:04   #9 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by Genghis the Engineer View Post
It certainly used to be the case that a US qualified pilot had PPL privileges VFR in the UK and could legally rent a G-reg . Did that change when I wasn't paying attention?
Didn't EASA poke its nose into that and demand a FAA pilot get an EASA licence to fly EASA aircraft, or N aircraft in Europe. Or did that get put on the back burner, I seem to remember something?
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Old 18th Mar 2017, 22:53   #10 (permalink)
 
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CrashOne,

I read somewhere that the UK and the USA had reciprocal agreements with regards to this which overruled EASA nonsense...!

If only people stopped thinking only about lining their own pockets and thought a little about joining hands - it would make us all so much happier! (And maybe a little more sane too)
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Old 19th Mar 2017, 09:10   #11 (permalink)
 
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This is one of the reasons I voted for BREXIT .........
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Old 19th Mar 2017, 10:24   #12 (permalink)
 
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Just imagine if we had to go through similar absurd CAAs and/or EASA hurdles when renting a car in a foreign country... Sit and pass local "road-law" and other written exams, local medical/eye exam, language proficiency (in order to read the local road signs), etc. Different car type-ratings for a VW Passat, Vauxhall Astra or Fiat Punto. Notwithstanding that in some countries they normally drive on the wrong side of the road.

How did we, the pilot community, allow these bureaucrats to restrict general aviation in such a way? Didn't these countries sign the ICAO Chicago convention?
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Old 19th Mar 2017, 10:40   #13 (permalink)

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Sit and pass local "road-law" and other written exams ...
You can get caught out though. I slowed down to drive past some roadworks in Canada, then get pulled over and told off for not slowing down enough. Apparently I should have known that there is an automatic 30mph limit past roadworks that isn't signposted - never come across that anywhere else, and the rental company didn't give me a crib sheet of local "gotchas".
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Old 19th Mar 2017, 12:18   #14 (permalink)
 
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The terrorists are winning.
The empire builders are winning.
Apathy is winning.
None of them can agree on the colour of shite.
They are all too big for the rest of us to do anything about it.
Wait until EASA decides that to fly in any European country you have to be able to speak, read and understand the local language to level six.
The UK is becoming a police state.
Speed limits are being reduced to 40mph, dogs must be micro chipped, an air gun licence required in Scotland.
How long before the Police cotton on to the fact that we can still fly from one end of the country to the other without them being able to pull us over for a sniff?
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Old 19th Mar 2017, 13:06   #15 (permalink)
 
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As an answer to the OP, from here:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Calderwood
Pilots holding non-EU licences for the non-commercial operation of aircraft with Europe are to have the validity of those licences and aeromedical certificates extended by another two years.

It will affect FAA licence holders and others.

The European Aviation Safety Agency and the EU Commission have issued the plan to extend the current opt-out in the Aircrew Regulation to 8 April 2019.

Pilots holding such a third country licence are advised to contact their national aviation authorities in order to receive further information on the individual use of the said opt-out by their Member States.

MORE [EASA link]
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Old 19th Mar 2017, 13:20   #16 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crash one View Post
The terrorists are winning.
The empire builders are winning.
Apathy is winning.
None of them can agree on the colour of shite.
They are all too big for the rest of us to do anything about it.
Wait until EASA decides that to fly in any European country you have to be able to speak, read and understand the local language to level six.
The UK is becoming a police state.
Speed limits are being reduced to 40mph, dogs must be micro chipped, an air gun licence required in Scotland.
How long before the Police cotton on to the fact that we can still fly from one end of the country to the other without them being able to pull us over for a sniff?
If only PPRuNe had a like button.
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Old 19th Mar 2017, 14:51   #17 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crash one View Post
The terrorists are winning.
The empire builders are winning.
Apathy is winning.
None of them can agree on the colour of shite.
They are all too big for the rest of us to do anything about it.
Wait until EASA decides that to fly in any European country you have to be able to speak, read and understand the local language to level six.
The UK is becoming a police state.
Speed limits are being reduced to 40mph, dogs must be micro chipped, an air gun licence required in Scotland.
How long before the Police cotton on to the fact that we can still fly from one end of the country to the other without them being able to pull us over for a sniff?
Yeap this democracy thing just ain't working out for us, way too many know-it-all do gooders and busy bodies. We should give the 'benevolent dictator' option a try and see how we get on, something along the lines of Tito's Yugoslavia looks like it may have potential.
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Old 19th Mar 2017, 17:12   #18 (permalink)
 
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Anyone with a notion to become a politician, beaurocrat, industrialist or accountant should be sent to Gruinard island for a ten year course in urban survival. Wearing nothing and carrying the tools of their proposed trade. A sheaf of white paper, an empty book of rules, a boardroom table, an abacus.
This system should have been implemented years ago, just prior to the Anthrax experiment.
When I was working as a toolmaker we would routinely solve all of the worlds problems during our lunch hour, analysing every solution to within a thou" or five microns for the Europeans.
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Old 19th Mar 2017, 18:23   #19 (permalink)
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From this I am getting - no one knows.

I am going to assume I am looking at a UK (G) registered airplane.

A really simple question - can I or can I not fly it solo.

On the Brexit thing I have found out that makes no difference UK will still be EASA afterwards.

I can see now why airplanes in the UK now cost less than they do in the US - everyone is getting rid of them.
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Old 19th Mar 2017, 18:33   #20 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by Ebbie 2003 View Post
From this I am getting - no one knows.
Yes, they do. Look at my post #15.
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