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Old 19th Mar 2017, 23:29   #21 (permalink)
 
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Originally Posted by Ebbie 2003 View Post
On the Brexit thing I have found out that makes no difference UK will still be EASA afterwards.
Only of the ECJ has no role in interpreting EASA regulations or resolving disputes around EASA, as "getting out from under the ECJ" is apparently a "red line" for our unelected prime minister.


So, if it's not the ECJ that sorts out legal issues with EASA, which courts do have jurisdiction?
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Old 20th Mar 2017, 02:07   #22 (permalink)
 
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I am obviously wrong but if EASA stands for European Ass Safety Administration and we are no longer European, then logic would dictate.......what exactly?
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Old 20th Mar 2017, 09:03   #23 (permalink)
 
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I am British, I have an FAA PPL (my only flying licence), I am domiciled overseas.

My question is simple - assuming I can find someone to rent me an airplane - can I legally do so in the UK.
Simply; Yes, the UK ANO Art 150 allows the holder of an ICAO licence to fly UK Annex II aircraft indefinitely and the current EASA rule allows the holder of an ICAO licence to fly an EASA aircraft up to the 8th April 2017, subject to the decision of the NAA registering the aircraft. The UK CAA is now likely to extend this to April 2019.
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Old 20th Mar 2017, 14:22   #24 (permalink)
 
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It is the DfT, not the CAA, which has to invoke the necessary flexibility clause of the Basic Regulation to extend the Art. 12(4) derogation.

But whereas the EC and EASA are content for a 2 year extension to the derogation, which would permit FAA licence holders to fly EASA aircraft for private purposes without needing a Part-FCL licence, it seems that the DfT may decide to gold plate this and restrict the extension to 12 months....

As for those whingeing about remaining within EASA after the UK leaves the EU thanks to the dim-witted 'exit' voters who believed that blustering bag of wind Boris, just remember that any other option (such as moving legislation back to Gatwick and Westminster) would certainly increase your costs due to the need to re-employ staff no longer required since EASA took over...
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Old 20th Mar 2017, 14:59   #25 (permalink)
 
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Having instructed in both the USA and the UK I would certainly recommend that before you fly in the UK you make yourself familiar with the UK CAA chart and airspace which is very different to the FAA sectional chart. Also different are semi-circular rule, traffic pattern/circuit entry, VFR transponder squawk, information/ radio service instead of Unicom.

It is not that difficult but if you just launch off you might find out the differences the hard way. Plus there are lots of small instructor differences. When I learnt to fly in the UK in a Cessna 150 I was taught not to lower the the flaps in a turn. The American circuits are tighter and FAA instructors have no restrictions on lowering flaps in a turn.
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Old 20th Mar 2017, 15:04   #26 (permalink)
 
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would certainly increase your costs due to the need to re-employ staff no longer required since EASA took over...
Excellent time to test out whether you need that staff at all...

GF
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Old 20th Mar 2017, 22:27   #27 (permalink)
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Seems that there are some views here - key one seems to be the extending of the 8th April 2017 date by a further two years - has that happened - there is only a couple of weeks to go?

With my non-flying hat on - the ECJ will continue to have jurisdiction over those areas where the appropriate body has contracted jurisdiction - so still got EASA, still got ECJ - this can change but I would think it will be far down the list of priorities come 28th March.

I have flown in the UK previously albeit not for more than fifteen years - now with the advent of GPS and those lovely magenta lines I do not anticipate too many problems and do expect to have a few hours of ground to reinforce my reading.
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Old 21st Mar 2017, 09:34   #28 (permalink)
 
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Sent an email to CAA validations on this subject last week. Will post if/when I get a response.
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Old 21st Mar 2017, 09:56   #29 (permalink)
 
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Will post if/when I get a response.
Could be a long wait!
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Old 21st Mar 2017, 19:36   #30 (permalink)
 
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The derogations that allow flying a G-REG aircraft on a non-EASA licence in the UK are published by the CAA. The most recent I can find is ORS4 1171 dated 3rd May 2016. See link below.
ORS4 No.1171: Amended use of Derogations Notified to the European Commission by the United Kingdom under Article 12 of the Aircrew Regulation effective 8 April 2016

The relevant part expires on 8th April '17 unless they extend it with a new derogation.

The list of ORS4 docs is at:
List of Official Record Series 4 - Miscellaneous

Last edited by Jim59; 21st Mar 2017 at 21:37. Reason: Spelling.
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Old 21st Mar 2017, 19:55   #31 (permalink)
 
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Could be a long wait!
To be fair, validations usually respond reasonably quickly... unlike approvals support! But having said that, I've probably just jinxed it!
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Old 24th Mar 2017, 16:40   #32 (permalink)
 
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I have just received an email from AOPA which says..
Private Flights in "N" Registered EASA Aircraft beyond April 2017

In response to a query raised by Nick Wilcock, the DfT has confirmed that the UK will be extending the derogation for private flights in ‘N-reg’ EASA aircraft within UK airspace (without the pilot needing to hold an FAA Airmen Certificate) beyond 8th April 2017. Currently we are waiting to hear whether the UK will be adopting the full 2 year recommendation of EASA and the European Commission.
Surely that should read without an EASA licence? Or am I missing another piece of regulation?
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Old 24th Mar 2017, 22:54   #33 (permalink)
 
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I think that this is the right way around, they are talking about a US registered aircraft flown by a UK (EASA) license holder. But the thread was about flying a G-reg aircraft on a FAA license so that question is still open.

If you hold an FAA license then there is nothing stopping you from operating a US registered aircraft, as long as it is for private flights only. (usual caveats apply though)
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Old 25th Mar 2017, 10:19   #34 (permalink)
 
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Flying an N reg in the UK using a UK license is something that the FAA accept under FAR Part 61 (61.3). That, as far as I know, has not been subject to any other UK regulation.

I know this thread is about using an FAA license in the UK but I think AOPA have their derogations muddled.
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Old 25th Mar 2017, 20:57   #35 (permalink)
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Jhieminga is right the query is on flying a G reg airplane with an FAA PPL.

N reg airplanes I'll fly wherever I like

Seems that the thing to be extended from April 2017 to April 2019 was/is in respect of a G licence holder flying an N registered airplane.

Believe me this is all very complicated and confusing - possibly the answer to what I am asking is so ridiculously obvious that it is inhibiting the answer?
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Old 7th Apr 2017, 14:33   #36 (permalink)
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Hello All

Latest info related to this wheeze

https://publicapps.caa.co.uk/modalap...detail&id=7828

Seems I am good until this time next year and then a test on air law 'n stuff.

Need to get a European medical too it seems.

Good luck to all you UK guys when the US retaliates, reforms FAR 61.75 and makes you all need a US medical and a knowledge test too

Last edited by Ebbie 2003; 7th Apr 2017 at 14:55.
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Old 10th Apr 2017, 01:54   #37 (permalink)
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Seems from their guidance that something is supposed to happen before the 15th April this year, can't work out what.
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Old 10th Apr 2017, 16:56   #38 (permalink)
 
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Need to get a European medical too it seems.
Or just an FAA Class 2? A Class 2 medical is the same as Class 3 (PPL) except it includes an eye test, and it says "Class 2" on the piece of paper. And it expires after one year, though it remains valid as a Class 3 for as long as the equivalent Class 3 would. So just ask your AME to make it Class 2 instead of Class 3.

Last time I flew solo in the UK, you just needed to posess an FAA license and medical. Looks like they have decided to make it a lot more bureaucratic, with an explicit validation. France did the same thing a few years ago too. You used to be able to show up at the FSDO-equivalent (DGAC) with your licence and medical and they would give you a piece of paper which was essentially a French PPL. Now it takes weeks. France doesn't ask for a Class 2 but does ask for a medical issued within the last 12 months.
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Old 10th Apr 2017, 19:53   #39 (permalink)
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All very confusing however you read it.
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Old 9th May 2017, 15:11   #40 (permalink)
 
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Does anyone know about ICAO licenses other than the FAA ones... I'm living in the UK with a Brazilian PPL (ICAO) willing to fly in a flying group in order to build some hours for the EASA CPL...
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