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Old 16th Dec 2012, 17:58   #21 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Northampton UK
Posts: 107
You could start by being more positive. Your posts are all so negative. Remember that in life things are generally self fulfilling. If you think you are going to fail, you are setting yourself up to fail.
Your instructor must think you are capable of passing or he/she would not put you in for the test, so do him/her and yourself a favour by adopting a positive attitude before you start, and do what you have been trained to do.
The examiner is trying to pass you, not trying to fail you. You just have to have faith in yourself and your instructor.
Fly well, keep calm and carry on.
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Old 17th Dec 2012, 05:40   #22 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: FL 410
Age: 19
Posts: 64
Thumbs up Private Pilot Oral Exam

hi friend, try to watch this:


good luck
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Old 17th Dec 2012, 08:13   #23 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: UK
Posts: 251
Quote:
So would I be right in saying that even if I fail on one specific point in either the navigation or handling section I'd have to repeat that entire section, even if the rest of the exercises are done well?
Are you planning to fail certain sections deliberately? Be positive. You have to make a very serious error to fail a skills test. If you have it in your mind that you will fail then there will be just one outcome. If the unlikely happens then worry about what you have to do on the next attempt, but not before.

I was very nervous when I did my test earlier in the year, but the last thing on my mind was thinking about failure. I was too concerned with trying to memorise all sorts of things that I would need to remember on the day of the test. I made a couple of silly, minor mistakes on the test but I knew immediately and told the examiner. He was happy that I had identified the mistakes and because of this it didn't affect the outcome. The most important thing, that others have said, is don't dwell on any mistakes for the remainder of the test. Fly each section of the test as though they are mini individual tests.
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Old 17th Dec 2012, 14:38   #24 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 183
Thanks again for the advice and kind wishes guys, much appreciated.

Jonzarno, I think I actually read somewhere that during the test you append the word "exam" to your callsign on initial calls. Is that not the case?
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Old 17th Dec 2012, 14:41   #25 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Cambridge
Posts: 279
Odai

I have not heard that version, but I guess it will work just as well.

Once again, good luck!
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Old 17th Dec 2012, 15:28   #26 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 183
Thanks a lot!
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Old 17th Dec 2012, 19:28   #27 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: UK, mainly
Age: 30
Posts: 415
Quote:
During the test you append the word "exam" to your callsign on initial calls.
No - that is reserved for initial CPL and IR tests. Your Examiner will brief you thoroughly on the content of the test (it isn't a memory test, so the airborne sequence will be briefed again before each item!), so stick to the briefing rather than trying to find hidden items in the briefing.
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Old 17th Dec 2012, 19:48   #28 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: UK
Posts: 431
Odai you're obviously apprehensive about your forthcoming test
so SPEAK TO YOUR INSTRUCTOR!

Quote:
I think I actually read somewhere that during the test you
append the word "exam" to your callsign on initial calls. Is that not
he case?
No! The "Exam" callsign is only allocated to CAA Staff Examiners and it
is very unlikely you will be tested by one of these as they mainly do
initial CPL and IR tests - If your Examiner is a Staff Examiner they will brief
you whether to use their personal Exam callsign or what you usually use.

The "Student" prefix (eg Student G-ABCD) is used for the initial call to an
ATC unit by a solo student pilot. On your test you are not solo and you
expect, at the end, to record the flight as PICUS rather than DUAL(Pu/t).

Quote:
One tip I was given when I did my skills test was that when making radio contact with ATC or seeking an information service I should identify myself as:

"G-XXXX student pilot on skills test"

All those I spoke to on the radio that day were very helpful.
ATC do not, necessarily, know what is involved in a skill test and may end
up being too helpful. eg: "G-ABCD you said your next turning point was
the Severn Bridge. You are 4 miles South of track. Suggest you turn
North 10deg" Just what a pilot wants post-PPL, but not on a
Skills Test - No opportunity for you to demonstrate to Examiner that you
knew you were off track and knew how to make the appropriate
correction - and Radar assistance is not allowed in a PPL test.

The FAA Oral Test video posted by benjaavpilot is excellent. You are very
unlikely to be quized at such length, or in such depth, but you should
know your planing and aircraft (including POH and Documents) as well as
that candidate - at least until you pass.

Remember it is you being tested, not your school, nor your instructor.
So if, for example, you are asked why you use 6USG for fuel consumption.
"Because that is what I was told to use" is not a good answer. "The POH
states 5.4USG for the power setting I intend to use - however that figure
is based on a factory new aircraft, properly leaned and flown by a test
pilot - so I am rounding up to 6USG to take that in to account" is a much
better answer.

Good Luck and enjoy.

If you have other questions - don't post until you also have the answers
FROM YOUR INSTRUCTOR

Last edited by Level Attitude; 17th Dec 2012 at 19:51.
Level Attitude is offline   Reply
Old 17th Dec 2012, 20:54   #29 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Hastings, UK and LA, USA
Age: 43
Posts: 1,479
The UK oral is very mild compared to the US one. My US multi engine oral was about 2hrs long and covered just about everything, even basic PPL stuff. Anything is fair game. Naturally, it's that particular examiners style and he's known for long orals, but still.
AdamFrisch is offline   Reply
Old 24th Dec 2012, 15:49   #30 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 183
Just to update the thread: my skills test was unfortunately postponed on Friday due to weather and the airfield resembling a lake.

Now scheduled for the 3rd January. It'll be three weeks since my last flight, but at least I'll have a lot more time to prepare, revise the theoretical material etc.
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Old 17th Jan 2013, 19:18   #31 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 183
Another update, after SIX cancellations due to being really unlucky with the weather we finally managed to get the ball rolling on the seventh attempt.

Really glad to say that I passed, made a few mistakes but learnt from them. Feels great to finally have it out of the way, now the serious flying can start!
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Old 17th Jan 2013, 20:24   #32 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Central London
Age: 31
Posts: 293
Many congrats! It's a great feeling to finally get through it.

Welcome to the club.
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Old 17th Jan 2013, 21:48   #33 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Unna, Germany
Posts: 291
Quote:
Really glad to say that I passed, made a few mistakes but learnt from them. Feels great to finally have it out of the way, now the serious flying can start!
Welcome to the club, Odai.... now tell us about the mistakes you made.....
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Old 17th Jan 2013, 21:58   #34 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Edinburgh
Age: 60
Posts: 19
Congratulations also from me! I am due to take test soon, previous cancelled due to confusion over new EASA paperwork, particularly need to have medical booked if you tak etest within 2 weeks of end of validity, followed by usual delays getting medical sorted

Caber
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Old 18th Jan 2013, 01:54   #35 (permalink)
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 183
Thanks guys!

I made a couple of mistakes with my navigation, map reading technique etc. This was made worse than usual by the awful visibility at the time. I also wasn't particularly good (to say the least) at getting the picture right during the glide approaches. I hadn't flown in 5 weeks, was tired, nervous, the visibility wasn't great, it was getting dark (well before sunset but still) so don't think I did myself justice. But I managed to pass and the combination of my examiner drilling into me what I got wrong and the horror of getting those things wrong on the test mean I won't be forgetting them in a hurry and will certainly be practicing them to perfection now.

Good luck caber0, I can only sympathise with your situation, the delays are incredibly stressful and frustrating!
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